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Out Door Sports and Pastimes

By Touchline.

CRICKET. The Cricket Enthusiasts. IT was only natural that, with the races on at Trentham last Saturday, the attendance of the sporting public at the Basin Reserve should have been limited to the out-and-out cricket enthusiasts; They had a_ fairly enjoyable afternoon, however, with as thrill in the North and. East match that caused much enthusiasm and not a little excitement, and made one feel warm despite the keenness of the northerly wind that was blowing. * * * * The matches in the first round were brought to a conclusion last Saturday, and the main impression with me at this stage is that we are going to be treated to Some Interesting Displays of cricket during the season now undei way. hub I am doubtful whether much interest will be taken in the games by the- general public. The war in Europe, and its many sidelights,* seem to be occupying the attention of the people to the exclusion of every other matter, especially that connected with the playing of outdoor sport. I. am hoping for a better state of things to happen along directly, but in the meantime' I have to take things - as I find fchem. The East-North Match. When" play was suspended at the end of the' first day, the East team were within one run of the total Bet. them by North, with three of their wickets still to fall. Prance and,. Wetherall started the ball 'rolling, and did so well that before/ they were separated 29 runs had been , added to the score-sheet, and the side, were in a good position. France enhanced the opinion that had been formed of his batting on the first day, and on the whole did exceedingly well for a

lad in his first senior game, promoted in one jump from third-class status the previous year. This lad has a fine straight drive, and, as he develops, should let loose some of his other scor- ■ ing shots. • I liked Wetherall very much, especially in the shots in front of himself. He came into the East team with a fair reputation in outside cricket, and, with the advantage of regular practice on the better class of wickets as we know them, should improve. When France was dismissed, the end of the East innings soon came, for two balls latei- Wetherall followed him. Mabin was last man in, and he ballooned his second ball from Southall, enabling Hiddles'ton to bring off a fine running catch. K * * * The North Innings. Recognising that there was no time to waste if they were to avoid a defeat, the North batsmen went in with instructions to get runs as quickly as they could. So well did they succeed* in their endeavour that, when the innings was over and done with, they had scored 119 runs in an hour and a half, fairly good going as we know cricket in Wellington. Hiddleston led the way with a finely played innings of 29, and others who helped considerably were Wilson, Bray, Southall, and Walters. Southall's innings was the surprise packet of the lot. When the lengthy bowler went in, the East bowlers looked for an eas;y wicket, but his .second ball he pulled right round to square-leg, and six runs resulted from the stroke. The „ spectators cheered and cheered again, and they kept up a running fire of encouragement all the time Southall was at the batting crease. He defied all the bowling sent ,him. and the innings was only terminated when the man at the 'other end was dismissed. * # «• * The Thrill Referred To. It was- just about half-past four when the East fellows started their second innings, and it became a question whether they would try for the three-point win or be content with the two-pointer they had already in hand. But thel innings had hardly started when the thrill came along. With 8 runs on the board both the opening batsmen —Donovan and Dooley—had been dismissed, and one run later Gibbes and had followed them back to the pavilion. A win to North seemed at this stage to be within the bounds of possibility, for Hiddleston was sending down so many good "wrong-'uns" as to have the oppo-

sition tied up altogether. At the stage lam referring to his figures were: 10 balls, 6 runs, 3 wickets. Midlane the Champion. But just here Fred Midlane took up the batting, and once again carried the East team on his back to victory. France and Smith both came and went, and the score-sheet showed six wickets for 43 "runs—Midlane's contribution being *20 of this number. With Mm well set anything was possible, and Henderson, a left-handed! youth with a.good sweeping stroke in his kit, helped Midlane to knock off the runs wanted. The most of the glory belongs to the East captain, for he played excellent cricket for his runs, but the youth came in at an awkward time and did his part well. Results of the Games. East,. 145 (France 20, Wetherall 16) and 93 for six wickets (Midlane 42*, Henderson 24*); North, . 117 and 119 (Hiddleston 29, ' Wilson 16, Bray 15, Southall 14*, Walters 11). A threepoint win for East. . • University, 159 and 173 for five wickets (Dickson 38*, Broad - 38. Stainton 24, Caddick 22, Burns 18, Fanning 11); Central, 118 (Burton 39, Paterson 14, Naughton 13, McCardell 11*, Norris 10). A two-point win for University. Petone, 258 for four wickets, innings declared closed (Nunn 107*, Brice 74 , Cate 14, Aldersley 12); Old Bo.yß, 159 and 96 (E. M. Beechey 33, Hindmarsh 17, Blacklock 13). A three-point win for Petone. * * * * Bowling Figures. Arthur Fenton proved himself once again to be a strong man for University, his tally of six wickets for 47 runs being a distinctly good one for the initial effort of the season. Other bowlers who were successful in. securing wickets were : —University : Dickson, four for 60. Central: Johnstone, one for 25: Haughton, two for 15; Naughton, one for 16. North: Southall, four for 69 and two for 37: Walters, one for 18; Hiddleston, four for 45 and four for" 37 ; Bray, one for 4. East: Gibbes, five for 69;' Dooley, one for 28 • Nash, three for 12. Petone : Brice, four for 20 ; Finlayson. two for 34; Bennett, one for 10: Rodgers. one for 11.. Old Boys: Tucker, one fox; 15; E. M. Beechey, two for 65: Marris, one for 21. # * * '* The Central=University Match. was mainly a fine batting practice for the University players, which should help them considerably ill their future matches. In his efforts to dispose of . the students in their second innings, the Central captain tried eight of his team as bowlers,, but none of them got figures that were at all flattering to them. Burton, who was the main scorer on the Central 'side, had bad luck in being given out caught at the wickets. I don't mean that he did not touch the ball he was given out to, but from my viewpoint the wicket-keeper did not seem to hold the ball long enough to fairly catch , it. Of course, I was in a much different position from the umpire who gave the batsman out, which may make all the difference in the world to the happening. The batsman in shaped splendidly all the time, and it is pleasing to me to see him making such

a good start, for I am satisfied that Burton is worth more runs than. he. credited himself with last , season. Hick Son had bad. luck in a ball on just before he settled . down. Naughton got right into his stride from his first ball, and. looked like . knocking the runs off himself, but he was oiitea by a brilliant' catch. McCardell arid Paterson—both impetuous batsmen—added their runs to the total in quick time, but they could not keep together long enough to bring victory anywhere near the way of their side. : . : In. this match the Central fellows showed themselves to be anything but & strong side, but when iidoinson comes into the team he will strengthen them a lot, both-with the ball and the bat. #* * ■ How the Teams Stand. It is going to be a bit of a job. this season to find out how the teams are progressing as the matches go on, for the simple reason that losses count against the teams as well as wins for them. The following will illustrate-this: —

This means, say, that if North score a three-point "win in their next match, they will just wipe off that minus 3, and should East be again successful they will be credited with 6 points. I must confess that I don't like the new arrangement, but it has been found to work so well) in other places—Sydney,for example—that I am quit© prepared "too give it a trial before comparing it with the method that has previously been the rule in Wellington.

The First Century=Maker" of the season is Horace Nunn, "the young Petone player we heard, so much about during the football season. He has promised well in his previous efforts on the cricket field, more as a leg-break bowler probably than as a batsman, and the hope is that now that he has met with the Success that comes but seldom the way of a young cricketer, he may take the game seriously, for he has possibilities of a distinctly high order. Stan Brice had a good time, also, at. the expense of the Old Boys bowlers, but he has made many fine scores in the past, and the experience is not a nevr on© with him. Still, it is pleasing to see the youths and the veterans alike doing their share. * * « * j Casual Notes. Hearty congratulations . to Arthur Birch, of the University team, on his marriage last week, and the best of food wishes to him apd his wife. _ Mrs. >irch is a sister of G. Howe, Wellington representative and University wicketkeeper last season, who is at present with the New Zealand Expeditionary TToroe in Samoa. It is, therefore, but a fair thing to conclude that Arthur Birch will be round in his usual place on the Basin Reserve during the present cricket season. There is one pleasing feature to record in connection with the matches jso far, and that is the punctuality that is being observed by the players in commencing the games. To my mind, this is a factor that makes for the better playing of the /game, and should be the rule rather than the exception. It is disheartening to find time wasted at the beginning of the afternoon, for it is altogether too short as it is for an enjoyable game. J hopel that the players.will keep going r.r they have commenced. The umpires in their white coate was a pleasing feature last Saturday afternoon. The coats had been nicely laundried, and the whiteness of them helped considerably the batsmen getting a Tjetter sight of the ball. The wickets at the Basin Reserve are in splendid order, considering the fact that there has been such a shortage of Tain since the summer season started. A little bit of rain would go a long way towards effecting an improvement.

„ £ 7 J,d. !§ S. a. 2 •■5=5 >2 o Ji a ft !> . j . o Petone .... 11 0 3 East ... l i o 3. University 1 10 2 Central ... 1 0 1 —2 North ... 1 0 1 —3 Old Boys ... 1 0 1 —8

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Bibliographic details

Out Door Sports and Pastimes, Free Lance, Volume XV, Issue 748, 31 October 1914

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1,909

Out Door Sports and Pastimes Free Lance, Volume XV, Issue 748, 31 October 1914

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