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ALL SORTS OF PEOPLE

A S a fact beyond dispute, Wellington fjk folk are pleased with. Mr. J. G. Aitken's appointment to the Legislative Council. Mr. Aitken holds narrow views on some subjects, but he is sincere. He does good by stealth, but he is often detected in the act. People believe in his honesty and goodwill, and it is improbable that he has an enemy on the planet. * * * * For gome weeksi various rumours have been going round concerning little Cecil Haines, who went to Sydney some months ago. ■ One was that she had lost her memory and completely collapsed. One was still worse than that. _ Another was that the child has meningitis. The earlier rumours, friends of the Haines fam-. ily have absolutely denied; but it would be well that the truth should be estab- , lished as soon as possible. Some reas--1 suring news has been published this week that Cecil is in good health, but the Free Lance feels, and has long felt, that Cecil should have a complete rest for a time. The little brain has been worked too hard and too constantly. So young a girl should'not be under such conditions of strain and fever. The rights of childhood should be respected, s * * * * Miss Ethel Warwick, the actress, well known in New Zealand., is suing in the London courts for restitution of conjugal rights. Her husband, Mr. Edmund Waller, is, it will be remembered, a son of the eminent Lewis. In England this is the-most respectable and popular first step to divorce by those who can _ afford it. Disregard of a decree of restitution is construed as the equivalent of desertion for two years or_ over. Miss Warwick is now playing in 'Sealed Orders" in Australia. * * . * * Mr. P. W. Gough (Paddy), a journalist* well known in Wellington, is now in Brisbane engaged in work connected with the Queensland Government's exhibit at San Francisco next year. It is on the cards that Paddy may get over to the big Exposition himself. Meantime, he sends cordial regards _ to old New Zealand friends, and has imported eighteen new and delightsome anecdotes about the Irish judges. * - * * * Said that the hairiest man in Parliament' is Mr. Colvin, and that the least ihairy is Mr. Rhodes —the little one. What about the "wild and woolly" Thames now P * * * * The "Times" of Dargaville refers to Sir Joseph Ward as "the only baronet New Zealand possesses." There are, in point of fact, at least three or four others; but that is about as near to ao--curacy as journalism in the wilds of Dargaville can get. * * -> * * Mr. Charlie MacMahon, mainstay of the Devout Brothers, who has been very ill in Sydney, is happily on his feet again. This is good news. Charlie is a staunch pal and a great and we could not afford to lose him in the flower of his youth. * * * * The new Chief Justice of Tasmania is "Mr, Herbert Nicholls. A few years ago be was Attorney-General under the Propsting Administration, and he went to the Bench when Propsting's crowd went .out. He is an active enthusiast' in all sorts of things, and is still well - under fifty years of age. At one time he was said to be the finest road-walker in Australia. It is told how he left a, friend's house at one o'clock one morning, walked sixty-five miles over hill and plain to Wellington, reached home at 5 o'clock in the afternoon, • bathed and had dinner, and then strolled along to the_ Athenaeum Club and played billiards till midnight. * *. * * The Inclement Wragge is back in New Zealand, and we may expect some lively ■weather very shortly. * * * * Lady Randolph Churchill is a remarkable woman. Just now she is suing her sons to determine whether her divorce from Mr. Cornwallis-West has re-consti-tuted a new executorship of the will of Lord Randolph. She forfeited the executorship when she acquired her young Second husband, and now she has dis- . charged that fickle youth she reckons she should be able to take it up again. Her sons are plainly not keen about it. They probably think thai} an irrepressible mother with a taste for young husbands is not an ideal executrix of her original husband's estate. . * # » ♦ The death of Sir Denis Anson on the Thames throws a sort of sidelight on the cheap idea of "having a good time." He

was one of a launch party that included Lady Diana Manners, Miss Iris Tree (the six-foot daughter of the famous actress), Miss Nancy Cunard, and Count Benckehdorff, and out 'of bravado he dived overboard-in his clothes.- The current was swift, and he was drowned, along with, a poor musician who tried to • rescue him. Here is no tale of a drunken frolic, but of the folly of a good man and a strong swimmer, who did-a senseless thing merely because he was dared to do it. That is all. Sir Denis Anson was a young man of high character, and the launch-party was composed of people of repute beyond suspicion. Nothing but a light suggestion, a stupid frolic, and — two good men drowned. The thing is so tragic because it was so unnecessary.

A medical friend "with, an excellent position in one of the Southern States (U.S.A.), writes to us touching lightly on American politics. He says that on the whole the people are pleased with President Wilson, who is able, honest, and a statesman, with a wonderful control of Congress. He has impressed his will on the administration as no other President has been able to do in our time. His ideals are high—so high that, the politicians don't know what to make of it. Mr. Roosevelt will run again for President, keep on running again till he dies: a very remarkable man, but unquestionably unbalanced. Mr. Taft is an excellent man who is glad to be out of politics. Now that the Canal ToUs Act has been repealed, America has no squabble with John Bull. The President is in the wrong if he expects honest elections in Mexico or any stable Government there: the Mexicans will never be anything other than what they are, and must be governed by a stronger nation. The navy and army are spoiling for a fight, but the American people don't want war. These are the notions of level-headed people in the Big Republic. * * * * The first woman Socialist candidate for the Commonwealth Parliament is Mrs. Emily Paul, wife of Colonel Paul, of New South Wales, and ten years ago an active worker in the Liberal cause. She says that she was converted to Socialism bv reading,, thinking, and meeting people with different ideas from her own.

This conversion took place in America, where she recently spent three years. t A comely woman., still young, with an_ inveterate habit of changing her opinions suddenly. Mr. Bertrand Stewart, the Englishmen who was secretly tried as a' spy and spent two years in a German prison, contributes an article on the German Menace to the "National Review/' He scoffs at the idea that Germany is friendly to England, and says ''a show of friendliness has been assumed in the hope that she may obtain concessions from us, and that the British nation, with its proverbially short memory, will be lulled into a feeling of false" security. _ But what, is really her present position as regards

ourselves? There have been pleasant speeches by the German Ambassador. But has there been a reduction of one soldier or one sailor as a proof of this friendliness? On the contrary!" * * * * King Alphonso of Spain is the on© keen royal polo-player. So keen that he recently sent the Duke of Penaranda to see and report on American matches. The Duke is about the proudest aristocrat in Europe, with a strong strain ,of royal blood in him, so that the mixture of Penaranda and America must have been very interesting. * * * * Mr. Justin Huntly McCarthy says that realism has had its day, and the. world is ready to go back to romance. He has had some romance in his own career, being for a disturbed period some years ago the one and only nusband of the impish and mercurial Miss Cissie Loftus. An animal story. Two years ago, Horse 397 of the New York Street Cleaning Department was condemned as unfit for further service. The big animal wae saved from destruction by Dr. Aaron Silkman, and 1 sent to his laboratory at Otisville. As champion producer of diphtheria anti-toxin, that old horse has in two years been worth £35,000 to the State of New York. He lives luxuriously in a model stable, he feeds luxuriously, he enjoyg every ppssible atten-

tion, he enjoys excellent health. But in sixteen months he produced no less than 232,800,000 units of anti-toxin, contained in ■ more than a thousand quarts of blood. He is bled on an average once a week, and he thrives on it. Hp is far fitter for work, than he was when he stopped work, but he will work no' more. , * * * * Mr. Hillaire Belloc is shortly to commence a lecture-tour of the United States. In' one of his lectures he will offer an antidote to Socialism. * * * * President Huerta, "Last of' the Big Indians," "is a keen man and a fine talker. with a touch of biting epigram; ... He. probably drinks more brandy than any other public man on earth, but he is. rarely intoxicated.. -His astonishing capacity for alcohol is, in fact, the despair and admiration of his friends. . * * • * ■* ' ' Mrs. Gertrude Atherton, the novelist, who is an advanced woman in her way, hates the militant suffragettes. "Twenty thousand of them are not worth one Ve-, lasquez." she . says. "They ought to be shut tip like other maniacs. They-differ from, what might be called malignant insanity." * * * * Stated that since a recent visit to Paris, where she was outshone in garb by the wife of the President, Queen Mary has taken to dressing more fashionably than she has .ever done before. ' She may even some day delight her sub- , jects by changing the style of her hats. *. * * I * ; The Prince of Wales got through his first unaided public ceremony the other day, laying a foundation-stone in London. He seemed "more perplexed than pleased." He is twenty now, and they will be getting him a wife soon. Then he may feel more perplexed than ever. * * * * Character-reading from the hair is the ' latest Parisian fad, and its high-priest is M. de Rochetal, the "graphologist." He ■ says that "the hair near the brain 'represents the intellectual faculties and the imaginative, artistic, and idealistic instincts. The moustache represents the affections of the heart—young and normal love." Quite so; but where does : the bald, clean-shaven chap come in? * * * * Stated that Queen Mary habitually refers to the suffragettes as "the Furies," and hateis them so much that she recently threatened to leave London at the height of the season if she suffered any more annoyance from them. < * * * * Mr. Henry James, the novelist, is a modest man. When his portrait by Sargent was damaged* by suffragettes at the Royal Academy show, he refused over fifty requests from , newspapers to publish photographs of it. Pressed for .reasons for his refusal, he said that the ' reasons were "too > numerous and too complicated" to give in detail. * * * * A wave of charige is passing, over the men on the "inky way"' in Christchurch. Charles Turner, who had the foresight to snap up in the bonds of matrimony one of the legatees of the late Mrs. Townend, has left "The Sun" to proceed to England. Baxter O'Neill, a promising colt from the "New Zealand Times, - ' isnow filling Charles's boots so effectively that the seams are showing signs of strain. The "Ma" Conservative jour- ' nal of the woswer town is also booked ' to pass through the valley of tribulation. Noel Jennings, who has been scoring well with his police-court work, attracted the eyes of the Auckland "Herald," and has yielded to the blandishments of the golden purse v A. C. Tytheridge, a journalistic colt with the unusual appendage of "M.A." to his name, influenced by the same solid element together with a little romance, has cut the painter and is headed for Suva. Rumour has it further that in the near future at least two other constituents of the paper's "brains" ■will b6 handing in brief but fateful not- . ices forecasting "change." Altogether 'twould seem as if. under the stress of the competition of the "Sun," the* newevening journal, the system adopted by the economic journals of running two papers —morning and evening—on ti-e one staff is developing a natural and inherent weakness. * * * * Some very interesting people were passengers by the Willochra last week for New Zealand and Australia. Ajnongst them were the two examiners for the Roval Academy of Music and Trinity .College, viz., Dr. Alderson, a very fin© English organist, and Mr. English, who has been in Australia and New Zealand. . on a similar mission previously. They have gone on to Sydney. Several of the delegates, who are attending the Conference of the British Society for the Advancement of Science in Australia were also on board, amons them Professor Wood, of Oxford, Mr. Bevan, who was accompanied by his daughter, Mr. Blamires (Mayor of Huddersfield, where he is a well-known woollen manufacturer), Mr. Challinor,' a leading barrister of Abingdon (who was also accompanied by his daughter). There was a lady professor from the Illinois University, who disembarked at Tahiti,-and is also accredit-

ed. to the Conference as a delegate. Mr. Blamires is an uncle of the two Wesleyan clergymen of this name, on© of whom was also a well-known cricketer in Wellington until his translation about a year ago to Taranaki. Mr. T. G. Russell, barrister, of Cfrristchurch, returned by the Willoclira from a visit to the United. States and Canada, where for some time he travelled with his son-in-law. Commander Evans, whose lectures on the South Pole expedition attracted crowded audiences in America. His platform style is most engaging, and the. lectures were copiously illustrated with lantern views. * * * * Evidence in the Schumann-Heink divorce case, which was proceeding in Chicago when the mail left, makes it look likely that the famous diva will l get her decree. Husband DEtapp was very friendly with a Mrs. Dear. She used to call him "Honey.' 3 In one of his letters he called her "the dearest, most beautiful, and most; brainy woman in the world." Also, thev had been seen sitting indiscriminately in each other's lap. That settles it. * * * * If a statement by a London journal is to be credited, the Prince of Wales is inheriting his grandfather's sporting qualities. According to this paper young Edward had a bet of £5000 to £150 from a member of the Marlborough Club over the double event of Ouimet, the American . golfer, winning the golf championship. and Black Jester the Derby. If so,the Princeling lost his £150. * * .. * Deep mystery has been surrounding Sir Edward Carson. Rumour had it. that Britain's stormy Ulsterman was engaged to be married, and various newspapers breathlessly rushed into orint with the rumour. When, bailed up by inquisitive pressmen to verify the report. Sir Edward vaguely and tantalisingly stated that the report was quite unauthorised. This was neither yes nor. no, and when somebody asked for more definite particulars the would-be dictator of Ireland's destiny retorted : "This curiosity regarding my private affairs is a gross impertinence." If it is really true tliat Sir Edward is contemplating the matrimonial plunge—-well. a_ man in love surely isn't seriously preparing to sacrifice himself for Ulsters sake at the pame time. . .

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ALL SORTS OF PEOPLE, Free Lance, Volume XV, Issue 734, 25 July 1914

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2,594

ALL SORTS OF PEOPLE Free Lance, Volume XV, Issue 734, 25 July 1914

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