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Afternoon Tea Gossip

By Little Miss Muffitt.

The Argentine really does get ahead of usi in some respects. For instance, a hst of children who "pLay the wag" from school is regularly published in the papers. There are no truant inspects ors, but the system makes parents careful • ♦ « There was an unrehearsed tragedy m a local tea-room the other day. Wine was making the best of a scone and a glass of milk when her husband and the lady help, who was sunnosed to be m the country attending to a sick mother, strolled in gaily for afternoon tea. They got it- — -hot. * « * Have you noticed with what remarkable a,°iht\ a tradesman raises the prices when the commodities he uses are more expensive 0 When flour "went up" bread followed a few hours after. Flour has now gone down to "normal." The bakers cannot stand the severe wieneh of cutting the price of the loaf. Perhaps, they are ttaativ" until flour goes up again -^ # If one clergyman starts the ball rolling, you may depend others will give the sphere a shove. Thus, one or two Northern churchmen have lately commenced making attacks on the "corrupt" press of this country, the "grasping pressman " and all that kind of thing. The law protects the blackcoated gentlemen, from interruption. The sore point with the complainants is that that which is edifying (sermons and so on} receives scant space, while that which edifieth not receives a great deal of space. Which is an invitation to the press to run papers on philanthropic lines without any regard to the bread-and-butter side of the question. Just imagine anyone "buying" a sermon — except a clergyman.

"Will you have a kerosene with me" is a real invitation m some places nowadays. People have found, especially m Fraaioe, that kerosene is as good a tiling as absinthe to enslave one and to ruin the constitution. With keroseitte at 3s 6d for four gallons, why be sober any longer? * * * The City Corporation has not nut a light over the clock at the tramway sheds A serious-looking person strolled into the shed the other night and borrowed a ladder, placed it against the wall under that unilluminated clock solemnly struck a match, muttered "Ten-twenty," descended, handed the ladder back with a polite "Thanks '" and was <rono I fear he was a ioker at heart * * * Wild-eyed enthusiasts in Australia want todelue-e Mr. Trumper, the cricketer of the eleven "centuries " because he happened to be m great fettle during the cricket campaign at. Home. Mr. Trumper is not in pressing need of gold No one is worrying much about the heroes who faced death in the Mount Kembla mine however. But, then, they are just ordinary working men, and did not win a cricket match All they won was life for their comrades * * * Is it not awful to think of Britain's 'apathy?" A German in Capetown said that if John Bull sleeps for another five -ears the Fatherland will "scoop the pool." Britain has. at the present moment, more ship-building orders than the whole of the other nations nut together I expect Britain won't cany them out. She is too apathetic. Poor old John Bull, the whole world is raving at you for not doing the total business of the globe and it raves at yon if you try to. Such accidents will happen in the best-regulated families. The other night, at the Rickards show a rather overdone lady sailed m and prepared to take ut) her reserved seat. There was a man occupying it To the usher she went, and created a diversion by insisting, in a very loud whisper, that the obnoxious person should be removed, and her husband would be alone presently The person was ignominiously expelled after he had protested in the same kind of whisper. As he was scoing out of the door the lady started dramatically "Georee," she cried. George turned round. It was her husband, who had come along to the theatre from his office, without going home Then the real entertainment commenced

So very like Woithmgtou, the pillar of the Temple of Truth, to insist on gome: first-class from Sydney to Melbourne, accompanied by the detective. But hard lines for the dear man to have to pay his own fare. Could not he have ban owed it from a lady admirer m Court or something? * • * A little incident I was fortunate enough to witness the other day Young a,nd blushful honeymooner was in the vestibule of one of Wellington's large hotels. He wanted rooms for himself and wife. "Suite?" asked the worried cleiK to save time. "Yes," he giggled, she is , the sweetest little thing on earth '" # ♦ ♦ I feel glad that it is not only in New Zealand that justice is served out in a tangled condition. A Melbourne groom, who stole a rug worth 5s (his first offence) was "sent up" for three months. The rug was restored to the owner. A gentleman who stole £283, which was not. recovered, seeing it was also his first offence, was discharged under "The First Offenders' Act." *■ ♦ « Dr. Torrey, the bearded evangelist, does not shave because it necessitates Sunday labour. At least, so he told the people in Christchurch recently. When he brings out this remarkable statement, the smooth-shaven Alexandei" squirms. It has been discovered that the last-named gets his Sunday shave over at five minutes to twelve on Saturday night. It may be interesting to know that both gentlemen wash their faces on both Sunday and Monday. • • • Coming home from a small and early dance the other night, I overtook a couple of obfuscated seamen, who were evidently not quite sure of their latitude. One gave up all hopes of ever seeing his good ship any more that night, and came to anchor against the iron railings of Parliament House. ''Come on, chum " said his more hopeful mate looking towards the home of the Government, "this 'ere's the Public Library. I knows where we are, and, in the dim mirk of midnight, I beheld two tarry individuals steering for the Botanical Gardens. * * * It is far nicer to be a plain unassuming person than a popular politician. You have fewer enemies. One M.H.R , who recently advertised for a lost pocket-book is the occasion for this observation. A gentleman called at his abode one recent midnight, when the rain and sleet was living up to Welling-

ton's best reputation, and knocked at the door. The servants did not answer naturally. The politician waited some time, and then stole down. A welldressed stranger, of prepossessing exterior, was revealed, as he switched on the hall light. "Excuse me, sir," he said, "you recentl" lost and advertised for a pocket-book?" "Yes." "Well, I considered it my duty to call along at the earliest opportunity to let you know that I have seen nothing of it. Goodnight!" * ♦ • It will be interesting to people who possess an "auburn erilt" coiffure to know that there are no red-headed lunatics in any of the New Zealand asylums, nor ie there a record of a "coppertopped' person ever having "gone off" in this country. There are compensations in being crowned with Rembrandt's favourite colour. * * • I have been privileged to gaze at the ''great daily" that mirrors the doings of the pearlers, Chinese, Japs, and Kanakas of Thursday Island. It is of small proportions, and costs 6d a time. "The Pilot" is in the throes of the early-closing question. Evidently, Thursday Island believes that it is the pulse that throbs the universe, and unless the five stores, two' blacksmith's shops and the saddler's do not put up their shutters, I fear me much there will be a row. One quaint person, at the public meeting, thought the shops should be kept open to avert street murders. Ugh ' * * » Delightful little tale that really ought to be true. You remember Dr. Mason's anxiety about the small-pox patient, when that gallant soldier was shifted to Mahanga Bay. Also, about that one recalcitrant trooper who refused to be vaccinated, and who was therefore kept in quarantine? It transpires that Dr. Mason used every effort to persuade that man to be punctured and that his overtures were stubbornly rejected. "I tell you what I'll do then," said the doctor, "I'll fight you." No sooner said than done, and the doctor and the soldier set too with vigour. Also, the doctor came off with some damage to his eyes. "Now, then," said the trooper, "I reckon it is up to me to get my sha<re of the pruel!" Whereupon, he bared his strong right arm, and meekly submitted.

It the old saying be true that "Happy is the bride the sun shines on," then the future welfare of Wednesday's brides is assured. The day was perfect, bright, and sunny, coming in the nudst of such wintry weather, and was much appreciated. On tliat day, a very pretty wedding was celebrated at St. Peter's Church, the occasion being the marriage of Mr John Taat, of Messrs. Tait and Co. Wellington, to Mis® Elsie Jessop, youngest daughter of the late Mr. Richard Jessop, of Auckland. Many girl fnends of the popular bride witnessed the ceremony, which was nerformed by the Rev W. C. Waters. • • • The bride looked sweetly pretty as she entered the church on the arm of Mr. J. D. Sievwnght, bv whom she was given away Heii w edding gown was of white silk, with ecru insertion, a coronet of orange flowers was worn under the veil, and she carried a beautiful bouquet of white flowers. Her bridesmaids were Miss Edith Jessop (sister of the bride) and Miss Ivy Scott, wearing pretty gowns of pale blue voile, with wide collars covered with ecru lace. The skirt® were finished with flounces, headed with ecru insertion, black velvet neck bands, black picture hats, and pretty red bouquets oompleted their toilette A sweet little maid, Miss Ada Pearce (neice of the bride), looked a Kioture in white silk and lace, and a trge leghorn hat Mr Fred Kirbv acted as best man, and Mr. A. Mellis Stuart ac oroomsman. The wedding party drove off to the strains of the "Wedding March," nlayed by Mr. S. C. Sihortt. A reception was held at Godber's, a larsre number of guests being present. The honeymoon is being spent in the South Island. * • « The Sydney-street schoolroom has seldom looked as pretty as on Wednesday evening when the Convent Old Girls' Association held their annual ball. Flags adorned the walls, interspersed with Chinese lanterns, and the stage looked charming with large pots of bamboo, and many palms arranged between the cosy seats. The sitting-out rooms were delightfully furnished and the bright fires burning nroved a Teat attraction. Supper, served in the gymnasium, was laid on three long tables, which were decorated with sprang flowers. Coloured lights hung just above the tables, and trails of graceful lycopodium were twined round, softening the effect. * » » The supper itself was splendid, being contributed by the committee and Old Girls. Dainty menu cards, in wedgewood blue, corresponded with the pretty programmes. The musio (Miiune's orchestra) was bright, and the floor m perfect condition. The "Old Girls" nave quite won a name for the success of their balls, and this season's will add to their reputation. The hard-working committee consisted of the following ladies Mrs T G. Macarthy 1 ). Miss Macdonald (vice-president). Miss Williams (secretary). Miss Duigan (treasurer), Mrs. D. Chapman, Misses Collins, Redmond, Sheehan, and Sullivan. There were quite two hundred guests present, and, m addition to the ballroom an anteroom was also brought into requisition for dancing * • * Lady Ward was present, wearing a very handsome black gown. Miss Ward was in white silk. Miss Fraser wore white, with straps of violets. Mrs. T. G. Macarthy wore a lovely frock, composed of white glace, rose chiffon and exquisite lace. Miss Fitzsimmon's gown of cream duchesse and embroidered chiffon was very much admired. Mrs. Tuckey wore black , Mrs. Gilruth, a black satin gown, with overdress of handsome jetted tulle. Mrs. Simpson was downed in grey brocade. Mrs. Jeff coat wore black, with sleeves of chiffon straps caught with tiny buckles. Mrs. Wvlie was in black satin. Mrs. Malcolm Rossi wore black. * * • Miss Skerretfs black gown was relieved with jet passementerie, and Miss J. Skerrett looked very well in cream brocade, with la.cc flounces, and she carried a pretty red bouquet. Mrs Stafford was in black, and Miss Stafford wore a becoming white gown. Miss Ringwood had on a handsome white siatan gown, with flounces of beautiful lace. Miss Kane was in pale blue, with chiffon frills. Mrs. Bannister was in black satin Space forbids more frocks so I will complete the list next week. * * • A fashionable wedding took place at St. Paul's Church on Wednesday afternoon the 24th instant when Mr. Vaudrey Baldwin, son of the late Captain Baldwin, was married to Maud, only daughter of the late Mr. George Friend, who was for many years Clerk of the House of Representatives. The bride was beautifully gowned in white duchess, draned with lace, the flounced skirt being finished with a train. A wreath of orange flowers was worn, with the veil thrown back from the face, and she carried a shower bouquet of exquisite flowers Her pretty little bridesmaids, the Misses Baldwin and A. Dun-

Mrs. J. D. Foleys novelty dances seem to be drawing a large concourse of dancers, Tuesday's masquerade proving no exception to the rule. Spiller's Hall was crowded to excess, and presented a very pretty sight, the guests wearing masks, dominoes, and fancy costumes. A committee of ladies made everyone enjoy themselves. Songs were given by little Eileen Foley and Mr. Dimion, and a oachuca was gracefully danced by eight young lady pupils of Miss Birdie Foley. The music and caitering was done in Mrs. Foleys happy style, and extras were played bv Mrs. Crocker and Mr Spiller. » * * A very enioyable euchre party was given, on Tuesday last by Mrs. Masters, at her residence, 2, Pirie-street. At supper-time the lucky winners were presented with handsome prize®. Miss Marie Young carried off the first prize for the ladies, and Mr. Herbert Radcliffe the first for the gentlemen Miss J. Merlet and Mr. L. Jordan won the boobey prizes. Mrs. Masters received, in a pretty heliotrope silk blouse and dark skirt. # Amono-st the guests were Misses E and M. Young, the former in a heliotrope silk blouse and black skirt, and the latter wearing a pretty white silk blouse with turquoise blue chiffon chou and pretty fawn skirt. Miss Larchin wore a pretty pink blouse , Miss Ethel Hall, black velvet, with a spray of scarlet geraniums on the bodice Mrs. Roach white , Miss S latter, white Mrs. Tyerman, handsome pink silk Mrs. Radoliffe, green silk Miss Radcliffe, pink. * * * Amongst the gentlemen present were Messrs. A. E. Boot, Stone H. Levestam, Bell (2). Radchffe (2), Jo l dan (2), J. Roach, Hall. * * * The D.I.C. windows are looking very pretty and a "block" is the order of each day in that part of Panama-street when the youth and beauty of Wellington gaze admiringly at the tempting display. Have you noticed, first and foremost, the satin merveilleux, with wide borders of contrasting colours. These are especially imported for blouses, and look so smart with the border edging a sailor collar and finishing the cuffs. Last year only a few sample blouses made in that style were to be seen, but this season they will be the "rage." One design is of navy blue, with a border in chintz. Another, of sky-blue, has a Paisley design for a finish and a third more matronly, but equally effective, was in black, with silver grey desi«ni. * # * Delaines are to play an important part this year, and the D I.C. have the

most delicate and pretty floral patterns. Some there are who "swear by" voile, so this dainty material is largely stocked. The white, either plain or spotted, is very dressy and suitable for warm weather. Nothing looks nicer than voile for race gowns. Pastel shades, soft blue and violets, and an exquisite old rose, were m evidence, blended with delicate fawns. A novelty in voile is the "snowflake," which could be worn well into the autumn, in rose colour, flecked with tiny white silk streaks. Taffetas and orepohnes. crepe-de-chine, and canvas cloths, m all their bewildering beauty, were displayed, and a very seiviceable situff — silk-faced lustres, in various shades — also promises to be in great demand. » * * Silks are ever to the fore, and the D I.C. can show anything and everything you desire in that respect. The pongees acre lovely, especially a few lengths in the newest shades, with a flora.l and lace stripe. The "lacey" part 15 a perfect imitation of black insertion, and looks exceedingly smart and dressy. Another dainty effect was of fawn silk with group*, of violet® in their natural colour, and one in wedgewood blue, with a braided design in white, was very sweet but, really the silks must be seen to be appreciated. Tussores are being ''rushed," and soft China silk will be greatly worn. Holland, linen and canvas is being sold for serviceable frocks. * # * With summer gowns one must have specially dainty underskirts, and iust now the D.I.C. has a wonderfully large stock— all colours, shapes, and prices, from the dainty white and cream washing silks, a mass of billowy, soft silk and lace, to the more sedate print skirt. A white moire, having all the advantages of glace, and infinitely more durable has a deep piped and tucked flounce and a sky-blue moirette, with Vandyke design in silk (black and white) insertion, was very smart. A pale green glace, with many tdny frills, all ruched or tucked, was one of many equally pretty, and a pale yellow silk glace was made in reversable style, and so doubly useful. One side had three tucked frills, and the other one a deep shaped flounce with pipings. # # # One that took mv fancy greatly was of crimson glace, with a triple flounce edged with deep black lace and insertion. A grey moire, with satin stripes was dainty, and an endless variety of purple and violet skirts in glace, moreen and moirette show that those shades are in great demand. The print and linen skirts are really pretty, and for tennis, picnics, etc., are far more suitable than the more elaborate ones. They are cheap too. I noticed 4s 6d marked on several, while 12s fid would bur the

can, were frocked m white, with pink silk sashes, and becoming white hats. * # • The bride was given away by Sir Maurice O'Rourke, and the ceremony was performed by the Rev. T. H. Sprott. Mr. H. Cooper acted as best man. After the ceremony, a reception was held at the Royal Oak Hotel. Mrs. Friend received, in a handsome black gown, and was holding a beautiful bouquet of purple flowers. Some of the

guests were Lady Stout, Mesdamee C. J. Joimston, A. Pearce, Grace, G. Turnbull, Quick, J. Duncan, P. Baldwin, Godfrey, Baldwin, Hislop, Gualter, Lowe, Dryden, Rose, Gore, Friend, and Misses J. Hislop, Haselden, Reid, Skerrett, Cooper, Brandon, Gore, Otterson, Duncan, Grace, Sir Maurice O'Rorke, Rev. T. H. Sprott, Dr. Grace, and Messrs. Baldwin, Rose, Duncan, Cooper, Gualter, Pearce, Otterson, Grace. Quick, Hislop, Arthur Cooper, and others.

perttiest of moreen skirt® with triple flounce. Figured muslin, well shaped, •and imsertaoned with Valenciennes, axe made in various colours, and one would be hard to please who could not choose from the D.I.C. stock. * • ♦ A novelty I noticed in gloves, and pretty, too, as well as cool and comforts able for the> summer. They were made entirely of silk lace, and I am told are much in favour with the Australian smart dressers. Mittens will also be worn this year. In addition to the various pretty beaver shades that are always popular, a new "make" will appeal to many, being inexpensive and good , it is of lisle thread, with a suede finish. Black stitchmgs on white and white on black, always look smart, and a delicate grey suede glove is most becoming. * * » Dressing and tea gowns are being made in the Empire style now. At the D.I.C, I noticed two — one in black crepoline, with wide bands of white and black, forming a bolero effect, a deep turn-back collar of white, and cuffs to mateh — it was very smart. The other, in sky blue cashmere, had a tuckedj short-waisted bodice, and then fell in graceful folds. Wide ribbon formed the bolero, and a sash of blue was loosely knotted at one side, the collar was deep and edged with lace, and the sleeves trimmed in the same way. Another gown was finished with hemstitched bands and a figured silk was elaborately trimmed with dainty lace.

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Bibliographic details

Afternoon Tea Gossip, Free Lance, Volume III, Issue 117, 27 September 1902

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3,464

Afternoon Tea Gossip Free Lance, Volume III, Issue 117, 27 September 1902

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