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AUCKLAND.

(From the Southern Cross .)

(From the Auckland Chronicle.)

A numerous and highly respectable public meeting was held on the 19th April, in the Exchange Hotel, Auckland ; at which a memorial, expressive of want of confidence in the present government of this colony, was drawn up, and unanimously agreed to, and a committee appointed to make the necessary arrangements

for forwarding the memorial to th 6 Right Hoii the Secretary of State for the Colonies. The meeting was exceedingly temperate and orderly. A meeting was held on Thursday, 18th May, at the Exchange Hotel, for the purpose of forming an Agricultural Association, which was numerously attended ; and in the evening, the members and others interested in the prosperity of the association dined together at the hotel. Several English and American whalers had arrived at the Bay of Islands. , The Alpha American whaler, had returned, after a four months' cruise, with a thousand barrels black oil, procured off this coast; and the Caroline sailed for London the end of April. The Prisoner Pickering.— We regret to hear it is intended to forward Pickering; together with the Port Nicholson prisoners, to Vaji Diemen's Land. We always understood that his sentence had been commuted by the late Governor ; and we certainly think, that both on account of his own good conduct (since he has/heen confined, and on account of the petition got up in his favor, his Excellency might shew a little mercy. We understand he has been very useful in gaol, in teaching the other prisoners to read and write. His sentence was altogether a severe one. And certainly, the way to reform him, is not to send him among hardened villains in Van Diemen's Land. We trust Mr. Shortland will take this opportunity of manifesting that he has the wish, as well as the power, to exercise the Divine attribute. O'j Sunday, the 6th May, the Bishop of New Zealand opened the New Cathedral, and delivered an eloquent and interesting discourse to a very numerous and respectable congregation. We understand Mrs. Hobson, the lady of our late Governor, takes her departure from this colony by H.M.S. Tortoise for England, with her interesting young family. We are persuaded they will carry with them the best wishes of every person resident in Auckland; and that whatever political differences might have existed between many of the settlers and the late Governor, a clear distinction was always made between his private character arid his piiblic acts ; the most obnoxious of which we now knovr, were not his deeds, but those of the miserable set who surrounded him, and whose faults and errors, from a principle of honor which they could not appreciate, he made his own. We wish Mrs. Hobson and family a safe passage, and we hope to hear of her return again to this colony. A detachment of the £>6th Regiment is daily expected from Van Diemen's Land, to relieve the 80th. It consists of 102 rank and file, 1 major, 1 captain, and 2 subalterns.

Daring Burglary. —On the evening of April 14th, between the hours of five and eight o'clock, during her temporary absence, the house o( Mrs. Morton, situate in Chancerystreet, was burglariously entered by the backwindow, and a box, containing from 50/. to 60/. in money, with several rings and trinkets, and many valuable private documents, taken from the upper story. The burglar's had also ransacked the entire premises. Should the box or documents be found cast away, we have no doubt they will be returned. Previous to the arrival of the " Parkhurst Seedlings," no such atrocious robbery had ever been committed in Auckland. Unfortunately, this description of offence is now but too common. A dog was left on the premises, which the robbers had, by some means, prevented from giving an alarm, as many people must have been passing at the time. We say to our fellow- townsmen, who have hitherto exposed their property outside their dwellings in perfect safety, to lock every thing up ; and look carefully to the secnrity of their doors and windows.

Queen Street.—We would draw the attention of the authorities to the wide and open drains in Queen-street, near the residence of Dr. Davis. There is scarcely room for a cart to pass. The drains require to be arched over.

Auckland Dispensary. —Some time ago considerable sums were subscribed for the establishment of a dispensary in Auckland ;• several meetings were also held, and a committee appointed. Having heard nothing of their proceedings for several weeks, we are induced to ask, '• what are those gentlemen about ?" We learn, however, that there is to be a meeting on Thursday next, when we hope there will be a full attendance of members. It is obvious that such an institution is more imperatively required than before, from the large influx of settlers, principally of the laboring class, and who, in case of sickness, would, in many instances, be unable to obtain professional assistance for themselves or families. Total Abstinence Society. —The Auckland Tee-totallers, who, some time ago, by their systematic course of " agitation," almost entirely engrossed public attention, aye now reduced, by secessions of many principal P*embers, to a very small number. The liberal contributions of the wealthy portion of our community have been expended in erecting the " skeleton" of a " Hall," which stands a monument of the folly of the early managers of the Society. In the hey-day of its prosperity, obligations were incurred, towards the liquidation of which these " breakers of the pledge," now refuse to contribute. It is, however, to the credit of the'few remaining members, that these

debts are in course of gradual liquidation ; but it is, at the same time, a scandal to those who neglected to fulfil their pledges. The Flax Company. — The Natives. — We regret to hear that the operations of Mr. Terry have been impeded by the natives, but we are not without hope that the affair, on explanation, will be satisfactorily arranged. It appears that the block of flax producing land chosen by Mr. Terry is on the Maraitai, not far from the head of the Wairoa, and about 22 miles from Auckland. This block formed part of the enormous claim by Mr. Fairburn, but which the commissioners disallowed. The natives say that the land was never purchased either by Mr. Fairburn or the Government, and refuse to permit its occupancy. On these facts being reported to the Governor, Mr. Forsaith, the interpreter, was directed to proceed to Maraitai.

The " Parkhuust Seedlings" again. — Frederick Home, aged about 15, was brought before the Chief Police Magistrate, on Monday, and convicted, on his own voluntary admission, of the offence of stealing a pair of boots from the residence of Mr. Symonds, in Official Bay. He was sentenced to nine months'imprisonment, with hard labour. The Chief Police Magistrate in passing sentence, stated that having tried the system of leniency and commisseration towards the Parkhurst boys, and finding that their acts of delinquency and disorderly conduct were rapidly on the increase, he would in this, and in future instances of a similar nature, put into effect the full rigor of the law. John Capping, one of the pestilent youths, was sentenced to two months' hard labour, for leaving his master and vagabondizing the town. Thos. King, another of the " Seedlings," was sentenced to one months' imprisonment and hard labour, for absconding from his master, and other misconduct. On the 25th April, 1842, came into force the Act for repealing the operation of the " Convict Code," the measure of all others, " says the New Zealand Journal," on which the colonists will have reason to congratulate themselves," one of the first measures we rejoice to add, received the Royal assent. The following is extracted from the Government Gazette : — ' Colonial Secretary's Office, Auckland, 3d April, 1843. His Excellency the officer administering the Government directs it to be notified that Her Majesty has been graciously pleased to confirm and allow the following Ordinances passed by the Legislative Council of this colony, Session 2. No. 3 — An Ordinance to regulate the Constitution of Juries. No. 4 — An Ordinance for extending the powers of Police Magistrates. No. s—An5 — An Ordinance to regulate Summary proceedings before Justices of the Peace. No. 12 — An Ordinance for Regulating the sale of fermented and spirituous liquors. No. 13 — An Ordinance for licencing Auctioneers. No. 16 — An Ordinance to provide for the summary recovery of compensation for damage done by cattle trespassing. No. 17 — An Ordinance for imposing a Tax upon Raupo Houses. No. 18 — An Ordinance to secure the Copyright of printed books to the authors thereof. No. 19 — An Ordinance to repeal an Ordinance enacted by the Governor of New Zealand, with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council thereof, whereby the Laws of New South Wales were ordered to extend to and be in force in the colony of New Zealand. By his Excellency's command, William Connell.

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Bibliographic details

AUCKLAND. (From the Southern Cross.) (From the Auckland Chronicle.), New Zealand Colonist and Port Nicholson Advertiser, Volume I, Issue 88, 2 June 1843

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AUCKLAND. (From the Southern Cross.) (From the Auckland Chronicle.) New Zealand Colonist and Port Nicholson Advertiser, Volume I, Issue 88, 2 June 1843

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