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THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE.

The Gazette issued yesterday disallows nine ordinances of the Provincial Council of Otago, and naturalises seven persons. It also contains the following order in Council : ORDER IN COUNCIL. 6. Grey, Governor. At the Government House, at Auckland, the 29th day of September, 1864. Present; —His Excellency the Governor in Council. Whereas by an Act of the General Assembly of New Zealand, intituled “ The Native Districts Regulation Act, 1858,” it is provided that it shall be lawful for the Governor in Council from time to time to appoint districls for the purposes of the said Act, being districts over which the Native Title shall not for the time being have been extinguished : Now, therefore, His Excellency the Governor, by and with the advice and consent of his Executive Council, doth hereby order, appoint, and declare that the territory hereafter described shall be a district for the purposes of the said Act, that is to say ; All territory lying within a boundary line commencing at Ngakuriawhaare (to the north of Katikati), proceeding thence by a lino running in a westerly direction to the summit of Te Aroah-auta ; thence in a southerly direction along the Aroha ranges to Mangatawa; thence by a line to the summit of Otanewainuku, thence by a direct line to the mouth of the Wairakei stream on the sea coast; thence by the coast line (including the Island of Teehua) to the commencing point. And doth appoint and declare that the said district shall be called the Native district of Tauranga. And doth declare that this Order shall take effeot from and after the Twenty-ninth day of September, 1861. Forster Goring, Clerk of Executive Council. The Court-house, Auckland, is made the principal polling place for the district of Franklin. It is notified that Mr. Ernest Louis Bucholz has been appointed Consular Agent at Auckland for Belgium. William Hodgson Donald, Esq., has been appointed Deputy to the Returning Officer for the Election ofj Members of tbe House of Representatives for the Electors District of Wairarapa. George Friend, Esq., has been appointed Clerk Assistant to the House of Representatives. The following appointments have been made in the Auckland Militia : James McPherson to be Captain. Date of commission 9th July, 1864. Ernest Louis Bucholz to be Ensign. Date of commission 23rd September. 1861. Charles Lewis Wiggen* to be Ensign. Date of commission 29th September, 1864. Arthur R. Cooper to be Ensign. Date of commission 30tb September, 1864.

Th« Commissions held by th« undermentioned officers j have been cancelled : Captain Sir C. W. Burdett, Bart., Auckland Militia. Ensign J. F. Naughton, Auckland Militia. It is notified that the pay of the Colonial Defence Force will be as follows : Troop Sergeant-Major - - 13s. Od. per diem. Sergeant - 12 G „ Corporal - - - - 10 0 „ Troopers and Trumpeters 7 7 „ Notice is given that arangements have been made under which Registered Letters will be exchanged between New Zealand and Hong Kong, by direct mail between the two countries. The tee for Registration will be one shilling on each letter, in addition to the postage rate. Captain Machin, of the steamship * Claude Hamilton,’ having seen a wreck or reef when passing about five miles to the eastward of Flat Point during the night, masters of vessels are requested to keep a good look out when navigating in that locality, and, in the event of observing anything unusual, to report particulars to the Marine Board. Formal notice is giv»n that Mr. John Waymouth has been appointed liquidator to the United Gold Mining Company. Taranaki.—Reports [were current in town yesterday that there was very important news from Taranaki, and that a well-known Government functionary at Ouehnnga had ridden in at full gallon with despatches for the Governor. The news was stated to be that the natives had been offering to sell their land, and that the war, or any prospect of a war, was therefore at an end. On inquiry we find there was no truth whatever in the’report. Mr. Jenkins. —We understand that it is the intention of Mr. Jenkins, who took the party of Maori chiefs to England, to deliver an address at an early date, upon the subject of diis visit to England, on the arrival of Mr. Jenkins in Auckland, many of the Maori chiefs who had been of his party in England, and who had returned by the ‘Flying Foam,’ gave him a most hearty welcome. Dead Drunk.—Some boys gave information at the Police Office last night that the dead body of a mau was lying at the foot of Smaile’s Point, at a place where two or three fatal accidents occurred a short time since. A party of police at once started with a stretcher to take the supposed corpse to themorgue, but happily the man was found to be only dead drunk, and was therefore lodged in the lock-up instead.

Coal Miners. —We understand that fire of the passengers lately arrived by the ‘Surat’ are coal miners ®rom South Staffordshire, they are men of excellent character, and are reported to thoroughly understand tneir business. Our informant states that many others of the same class are prepared to follow, should the reports of this advanced party prove favorable. There are also many South Staffordshire miners on their way here in the ‘Jumna,’ the ‘Columbia,’ and the ‘ Ida Zeigler,’ influenced chiefly we believe by lectures delivered by Mr. Jenkins, who was in that neighbourhood on his late visit to England. The Seat of Government.— The Colonist says : “ It is pretty generally acknowledged that the decision will lie, in the main, between Wellington and Nelson. Rumor, with her many tongues, has long since intimated, and the Wellington press and people have as long proclaimed us a certainty, that W shall be the Venus to whom the three sedate representatives of the graceful shepherd of Mount Ida shall award the golden apple. But we decline to receive such a rumor which is as premature as it is unjust to the Commissioners, whose work is yet incomplete.” Valuable Building Allotments.— Mr. C. A. Harris advertises thirty building allotments for lease in Queen-street, and also his own brick store in Custom-house-street. At the twelve principal ports of the United Kingdom —Loudon, Liverpool, Hull, Bristol, Newcastle, Southampton, Leith, Glasgow, Greenock, Dublin, Cork, und Belfast—there entered inwards last year 29,868 vessels, ot 9,185,105 tons. The number of vessels that cleared outwards was 26,621, with 8,520,303 tons. A Highlander 'named Hugh Main, formerly a lockkeeper on the Aberdeen and Inverary Canal, Jdied recently at Aberdeen at the age of 105 years. He retained all his faculties unimpaired to the last, and was walking about within a few days of his death. Cricket. —The following alteration of cricketing law will he interesting to many of our readers : —An alteration in the 10th rule, information of which was received by the last mail, must be regarded as important to bowlers. It will be recollected that, according to rule 10, “ The ball must be bowled ; if thrown or jerked, or if the bowler in the actual delivery of the ball, or in the action immediately preceding the delivery of the ball, raise his hand or arm above his shoulder, the umpire shall call,‘No ball’” At a meeting of the Marylebone Club, held in the tenniscourt attached to Lord’s Ground, in June last, the subject of high delivery was takeu into consideration, the matter having for some time previously received much attention. The Earl of Dudley, president of the club, was in the chair. It appears that, after a vigorous discussion, extending over on hour and a half, a proposition by Mr. Marsham, excluding from Rule 10 all restriction as to high delivery, was agreed to by a majority of twenty-seven to twenty-one, in preference to a motion by Mr. Fitzgerald for retaining the rule in its existing form. Rule 10 then will now be simply as follows :—“ The ball shall be bowled ; if thrown or jerked the umpire shall call ‘no ball.” This relaxation of the law can scarcely have the effect of giving any great advantage to bowlers ; but whilst many, freed from their previous fears of being uo-ballcd, may so far prbve more effective, the umpire will be relieved of a point that was often embarrassing, and sometimes productive of dissensions out of character with the game. The Native Question. —We copy the following from the Sydney Herald’s leading columns “ Although the exteut of submission, comprehending only a portion of the New Zealand tribes, gives no absolute assurance of immediate peace, it certainly offers the fairest prospect we have yet seen. Every good man will surely hail the sign. The dislike of the war which prevails in the English mind, though mixed with much error and absurdity, is nevertheless natural and respectable. We went originally with the offers of Christian civilization to these interesting people. They possessed and displayed both the vices aud the virtues of savage life. Their aptitude for improvement was once the theme of universal admiration. Their ambition springs from a class of sentiments which no Briton can regard with contempt. Their attacks npon the authority of the Crown may be in part explained by their ignorance of what it implied and of the consequences which rebellion involved. Their conduct in many cases has been highly honourable to their character, and they have seemed at one step to reach the chivalry of civilized warfare. To continue in hostility with such people must therefore be abhorrent to the feelings of all who have not felt the wrongs they have inflicted, nor suffered the vexaticn of their jealousy and outrage. To be able to reconcile with public duty the concession of peace and the exercise of the rights of conquest in moderation,' must therefore be a more grateful task to those who are responsible than the pushing the strife to extremities, |and changing it into a war of extermination. We have seen much absurdity, as it appears to us, in pushing abstract rights beyond a range where they can be exercised with either intelligence or safety. But, at the same time, it is always desirable that any distinction should rest upon personal qualifications rather than upon race. The course of Sir George Grey has been viewed by the settlers with some jealously. His policy at one period of his administration was certainly not intelligible to ordinary spectators ; yet it is not the interest of the colony to fasten upon particular incidents with too much tenacity, but to look to the general result of his administration in its final development. In such a task we at least certainly wish him complete success, and shall rejoice when, consistently with public safety, t 1 e burdens of war may cease to cripple the energies ot a country capable of immeasurable greatness. The Force of Love.— Dundee, nuwa'ays, is more famed for rough fabrics than romantic fables. The following piece of the “ romantic of real life,” however, we owe to Dundee : A Dundee lassta fell in love with a sailor, serving on board an Australian trader—quite in the old style—over head and ears. In these days of crinoline and calculation, young ladies, as a rule, do not so immerse themselves either in a river or a rapture. She shipped herself in man’s clothes, professing to be an ordinary seaman, in a brig sailing from Dundee to Chatham, intending when she reached the Medway, to find her way in the Thames, and there sign articles for a voyage in the vessel lucky enough to count her darling amongst its crew. The poor girl, however became so awfully sersick in the run between Scotland and England, that she felt herself compelled to disclose the secret of her sex to her captain, and he honorably kept it from his crew, and delicately gave up his cabin to her—the coaster proving himself a gentleman. When his brig dropped anchor in the Medway, he took steps to have the foolish truant restored to her friends. She reached her home, and found that she was fatherless. Her flight had broken her poor old father’s heart.

op Wales Theatre.—The unfavonrul.l. weather of last evening was the cause of a very iimitotl attendance at this place of entertainment. This did not seem, however, to have an unfavourable effect upon the performance, for they went through their parts with as much spirit as if the house had been crowded. The drama of “ Susan Hopley, or the Adventures of a Servant Girl,” was repeated. With the incidents of this piece our readers are familiar. The characters were vfe\\ sustained throughout, and in two of the acts s t cc tral illusions were introduced. A laughable local sketch of a haunted room in the Q.C.E. concluded the evening’s entertainment. In this piece a number of gliosis were introduced, including those of Taglioni and Fanny Ellsler, whose countenances bore a striking resemblance to the pretty faces of Miss Maggie Griffiths and Miss Julia Corcoran. The difficulties which at first prevented a successful exhibition of the spectral illusion known as “ Pepper’s Ghost” have been altogether overcome, and the managers arc justified in terming it a complete success. The effects produced are indeed remarkable. To see spectral and unearthly figures suddenly Income visible, having the appearance of living and intelligent beings, and yet impalpable to touch, and then vanishing in the same mysterious manner in which they came, would be startling and horrifying under other circumstances. Butin this case it is pleasing to know that you are only looking upon a singular and clever optical illusion.

At the Theatre Eoyal, last evening. Bulwtr’s famous play of “ The Lady of Lyons” was again presented with perfect success. The piece is too well known to all play-goers to need explanation. Miss Juno as Pauline received all the applause awarded to her on the previous evening, wh cn she made her debut before the Auckland public. Mr. Tom Fawcett as Melnotte, and Mr. Dunn as Dumas, acted their parts with their accustomed ability, and did not fail to elicit the applause of the audience, as the call befote the curtain, in conjunction with Miss Juno, nt the close of the piece, fully testified. The afterpiece was a triumphant success for Miss Juno, who took the pan of “ The Bonnie Fishwife,” as was the title of the piece. The broad Scotch accent imported into the character was very cleverly done, aud was fully appreciated by the North of the Tweed men who happened to be amongst the audience. Her portraiture of the Scotch fish-girl was very life-like, and given in a most acceptable aud unassuming The piece, as is well known, sets forth the folly of kite by proxy, and the failure of a father to name thj* partner of his son’s life, whatever have been his wishes on the subject, that love will find an outlet was fully testified by the hero of the piece, which was very cleverly taken by Mr. Tom Fawcett. The audience loudly applauded this gentleman in his rendering of the character. The other parts were well sustained. Mr. G. Fawcett and Miss Dunn did not make their appearance last evening, being set down for a holiday on the arrival of the justly celebrated tragedienne Miss Juno. To-night the famous play of “ The Elixir of Youth," and the capital rendering of “ Cinderella,” will bo given.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZ18641008.2.17

Bibliographic details

THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE., New Zealander, Volume XXI, Issue 2244, 8 October 1864

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THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE. New Zealander, Volume XXI, Issue 2244, 8 October 1864

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