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Savings’ Bank. —A meeting of the trustees of the Auckland Savings’ Bank will be held this day. Eauly Closing Movement. —There is to be a special meeting of assistant grocers at Messrs. Thomas and dagger’s office on Tuesday next, at eight o’clock p.m. Land Society, No. 5, has, it will be seen by advertisement, removed to its new offices over the stores of Messrs. Eoberton and Co., Queen-street, where payments will be received on and after this day. W esleyan Chapel, Hobson-street. —To-morrow, the anniversary services of this place of worship will be conducted by t lie Eev. Alexander Reid, and collections made at the close on behalf of the trust funds. Wo also see by advertisement in another column that a public soiree, in furtherance of the same object, is announced for Tuesday next, at which addresses will be delivered by various ministers and friends. The Phvebe, from the South, is due to-day, and it is expected that she will bring the Southern members of the General Assembly, which is to bo opened by his Excellency the Governor for the despatch of business on Monday next. Flagstaff. A number of men from 11.M.5.5. Curaqoa and Miranda arc busily engaged at the North Shore in making spun yarn, repairing running gear, &c. A large shed is to be erected opposite Messrs. Holmes’ hotel to serve the purposes of a store room and smithy. There is a fine piece of land in this locally set apart for a naval reserve and dockyard. Funeral of the late Honi Ropiha Tamaiia.— The funeral of the late Chief Honi Ropiha Tamaha—better known in Auckland under the name of John Hobbs —took place on Thursday afternoon. The remains of this excellent man were removed from his late residence to the Wesleyan Maori Chapel adjoining the House of Assembly, where the funeral service was read by the Rev. Thomas Buddie, assisted by the Rev. Mr. Schnackenberg. The body was afterwards taken to the burying ground for interment. Amongst those present who showed their respect for the deceased were Mr. Seed, private secretary to his Excellency the Governor, Major Goring, clerk to the Executive Council, Colonel Balneavis, Mr. Fenton, Mr. llat.se, Mr. IlardingWo have already furnished an outline of the deceased Chief’s history. The Cricket Match —Volunteers e. Militia —will he finished this day in the Albert Barrack Square, wickets pitched at 10-30 a.m. The General Assembly.— Workmen have been busily engaged during the last few days in extending the accommodation of the Assembly Buildings. A large room has been built at the back 50 by 20 feet for a dining hall; and the outside of the old building has been treated to a coat of paint, which it much wanted. The Volunteer Prisoners. —The three volunteer prisoners who have been incarcerated so long, on the charge of desecrating Maori graves, were liberated on Thursday morning. The decision arrived at has not been made public. The Volunteers met for parade, in the Albert i Barracks, at 6 - 30 yesterday morning. An advertisement ! in another column announces that every volunteer is cx- ! pocted to meet for training at the Albert Barracks at I 6-80 on Monday morning next, and each succeeding I morning until further notice ; and further intimates that j all leave of absence is cancelled from this date. The Front. —Yesterday, at noon, orders were issued j from Hie authorities that volunteer companies must be j warned to hold themselves in readiness to proceed to the front on an early day. No reason is assigned, but doubt- \ less some fresh effort is about to bo put forth by the 1 General, after the long period of apparent apathy which has elapsed ; and this is probably only thought necessary in consequence of the Maori raids which have been | reported in our columns as they have occurred during | the current week. The Provincial Council, at its sitting yesterday, j adjourned until the 28th November, in order to make ! room for the meeting of the General Assembly in the ■ the same chambers on Monday next. It is expected the j Assembly will, at their first sitting, move an adjourn- 1 ment for a fortnight to give time for absent members to assemble. Volunteer Ball. —On Wednesday evening the members of No. 5 Company, Auckland Eitle Volunteers, .rave a ball in the Odd Fellows’ Hall. The attendance of members and friends was numerous, and the enjoyment \ kept up with zest until a late hour. Mr. West’s quadrille band was in attendance, and performed its work ’ well and satisfactorily. Supper was supplied on the occasion by Mr. Macnamara with his accustomed taste, which elicited the encomiums of those in attendance. Altogether the re-union was a success. The hall was decorated with flags. A star composed of bayonets and ramrods was suspended on the centre of the orchestra, | with the colours of the Company above, which served to j produce a pleasing effect in the dressing of the hall. Odd Fellows’ Anniversary.— The members of the ! “ Parnell” Lodge and the “Good Intent” Lodge of Odd Fellows purpose holding a joint anniversary on the oth proximo. The “Parnell” Lodge anniversary should have been held in August, but was postponed in conse- j qucnce of many of the members being engaged at the front on military duty; and the “Good Intent” anniversary approaching, it was determined, at a meeting receutlv held, to combine the two. There is to be a dinner, succeeded by a ball, and it seems probable, from the preparations that are being made, that the festivities will surpass any of that kind that have hitherto taken place in Auckland. The “Tyburni.v.” —The Tyburn'icds troubles do not | seem to have ended with her release from quarantine. : Her captain appeared before the judge of the local court on I Thursday, to answer to the suit of the ship’s surgeon for | arrears of pay, and compensation for want of proper accommodation on the part of the shipowners, Messrs, j Shaw, Savill, and Co. The defence set up appeared to ] be one altogether unexpected by the plaintiff’. The j doctor had received a portion of his salary for professional j services—the remainder was withheld on the ground of j improper conduct. Several ladies and gentlemen, late ! passengers on board the vessel, were in court, who seemed to take an interest in the case, and who, it was said were ready to appear as witnesses against the doctor if called upon. On the other hand. Dr. Nicholson produces a testimonial extensively signed by passengers, which will bo found elsewhere. We give no opinion as j to the merits of the case, but refer our readers to the report of the trial, which will be found in the usual column. It will be seen that the Judge of the court will not give his decision until Monday next. j

DRURY

i [from odk own correspondent.] BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH. 1 Thursday, 12'20. Another man, named Jackson, has been killed by the Maoris in this neighbourhood. He, with five others, had been living in Mr. Hay’s house. He was killed last night, and this morning the body was found with ihe head nearly severe 1 from the body, and a boy also with him, seriously injure;!. They were supposed to be at work fencing. It looks very much like the rebels wishing to call oil the attention from the Tout. Thursday afternoon, October 15. The particulars of tiic last melancholy murder are as follows. It seems that six men have been in the habit of living in Mr. Hay’s house, and working in the neighbourhood. On the day of the murder, Wednesday, the poor fellow Jackson was engaged, with a boy of about 13 years of age, named Cnarles Sutherland, in pointing rails for fencing, about three quarters of a mile from Mr. May’s house, when they were attacked by some Maories; the boy only saw three. They fired at the boy, and the ball passed through his leg. They then beat and wounded him, but not mortally_ He was, however, left for dead, and, crawling into a ditch or gully, remained there for the night. Jackson ran, but was pursued and beaten by the Maoris, and sadly mutilated and hacked about, it is s ipposed with his own axe with which he was working. The head is nearly severed from the body. The boy made his way this morning to the Rev. Mr. Nome’s, and the body of Jackson was brought in to Papakura. Again we have a proof of the folly of settlers or scattered individuals living or working unprotected in the bush at the present time. It is utterly impossible that separate residences or farms, or small bodies of persons thus working can be protected, and besides the risk, and, as we have seen, frequent loss of life, great trouble is given to the military by it. Persons should not bo allowed to remain out when it becomes necessary for the public good that they should come in, and surely, if they will not come in without it, the government should take action in the matter. It gives the Maoris both an advantage and a cause for exultation. I have no doubt the Maoris would like to distract the attention of the military from the front, but fortunately we are now prepared for the front and the rear, and the rebels safety ground will soon cease to be. Friday, 16th October. About 250 blue-jackets arc expected up to-day. on their way to the front ; and more of Pitt’s volunteers will soon be up at Drury. There arc of course many surmises as to the attack on Moremcrc, —when it is to be, how it is to be, by whom it is to be made, and so on. 12 o’clock. Just before closing my dispatch, another account of a horrible murder has come in. Colonel Chapman immediately sent out fifteen men of the 70th., and a detachment of the Cavalry., I followed them up the road, as it was said to ho within a mile of Drury, and discovered that an old man and woman named Fahey were living in a cußage near the bush, not halfa-milc off the high road. Five or six Maoris rushed to the house, and struck the man down, dealing two severe gashes on his head. His wife was found deal outside the house, but no wounds were visible. The man is still living. This is the first time that a woman has been killed by the rebels. Is this “ destroying men, women, and children,” part of the heroic William Thompson's style of warfare. Now, surely, it will be seen that more than one “ flying column ” is necessary to clear the Bush. There were other settlers within quarter-of-a-mile of the spot where Fahey and his wife were attacked. The Victorian Volunteers are quite ready, and even anxious to take the Bush, and they have officers wel* able to lead them on. [by electric telegraph.] Friday, Three p.m. I have just seen the body of poor Mrs. Fahey, who it seems, went up this morning to join her husband ; she was killed by a ball passing through the bowels ft n rPCerTTTrrrg —crxrc——»-■ mttnt itnrxj been instantaneous. Fahey, who 1 have also seen, has received two or three very severe wounds on his head with a tomahawk ; lie is still living, but I fear there are very little hopes of him. He went up to his farm this morning, as was his custom.

THE WAIROA.

[from our own correspondent.] October 14th, 18G3. Two murders of the usual dastardly description were perpetrated yesterday by the Maori-, near the former residence of Mr. Henderson—two murders which might have been easily prevented, and for the occurrence of Wllich, the tardiness with which requisite measures are taken, is solely to be blamed An old and respected settler not far from Papakura, named Hamlin, came down io the Wairoa yesterday with his dray, accompanied by a son of Mr. Wallis, a Wairoa settler, who is at present, residing at Papakura. Mr. Hamlin was driving bis team, and the boy, whose aire is between nine and ten, was on horseback. Mr. Hamlin came down to fetch to Papakura some of Mr. Wallis’s property, and started about eleven o’clock on his return. Between one and two o’clock the mailman passed a bullock-dray standing unattended on the road, but saw nothing else to excite bis suspicions that all was not right. Soon after, however, Mr. Munro, another Wairoa settler, saw the horse young Wallis had been riding grazing in the road near Mr. Steele’s residence, riderless, but saddled and bridled. He immediately caught the horse and rode down to the Blockhouse to inform Lieutenant Steele that he feared all was not. as it should be, though on a well- | frequented road, and in broad daylight, he appro- ; bended nothing worse than that the boy had been [ thrown from his horse, which had subsequently broken j away from him. . j Lieut. Steele returned with Mr. Munro, and not \ meeting with anything particular on the road, except that they found the contents of the dray piled np on i the road side. They rode on to Mr. B. Smith’s, at j the Traveller's Rest Here they found that a settler, | named Colliding, looking for bis cows on the road near Henderson’s, ha I found the dead body of Mr. Hamlin in advance of the bullock team ; bad found the bullock dray fast against a stump ; and a little , further bank had found young Wallis insensible, but still alive. Mr. Colliding had immediately unloaded th* bullock dray and placed on it the body of Mr. | Hamlin and the poor hoy, and had taken them up to Ring’s Redoubt. Ha rdin was shot through the head, 1 and must have died instantly; the boy was severely | wounded in the face by a tomahawk. It is j surmised that the boy had been attacked first, that Mr. Himlin bad run away and been \ followed and shot, when ho must have died instantly. I Here then are two more most brutal and cowardly I murders, perpetrated on the high roa 1 and in open ! day, by the Maoris. The. roa 1 had been patrolled i till that day, by parties from the Galloway and j Ring’s Redoubt, hut on that day the patrol had not ! been out. Anxiety to s'enre a private means of conveyance j for my letter, as the arrival of the mail to-day is | doubtful, prevents me from adding more.

NORTH SHORE

THE NORTH HEAD VOLUNTEERS, [from our own correspondent.]) Three months ago when the people of Auckland were horrified by the report of the Shepherd’s bush murders and the attack on Capt. Ring’s escort, and when the capital itself was believed to be in danger, various local corps were formed for the defence of the districts and settlements around Auckland, The settlers at the Flagstaff were amongst the first to organise a volunteer corps, and have done good service as a night patrol along the northern shore of the harbour. Whilst thus detending their own lives and property they have contributed materially to the security of the town itself ; —for it was very natural to suppose that, if the Maoris attempted to reach Auckland by water, the North ■''bore settlers would not be wholly free from danger. It was this feeling that prompted the formation of the North Head volunteer companyand not any childish fears for the safety of the settlement, or a desire to be paid for their services. The company, after three months of active and useful service, has been dismissed in a very peremptory and off-hand manner by the order of the “ Defence (Hfice ” No word of thanks, no acknowledgment of their services, nothing but a simple order of dismissal rewards the officers and men for their labours during the past three months. It has been suggested that the corps has been broken up in accordance with the “ new policy ” of retrenchment. In reply, 1 beg to say that the matter of expense is, entirely the Government’s own fault. The settlers in organizing the company merely desired arms and ammunition in return for which they willingly offered to form a night patrol over the whole district. The arms were sent on these terms, but in a few days the “ Defence Office ” changes its mind and refuses to accept the services of the Company unless bound by the regulations of the Auckland volunteers and the clauses of the Militia Act on which these were based. The men assented on receiving a promise that they would not be, required to leave the district except in case of great emergency. The new terms entitled both officers and men to the same rates of pay as allowed to the second cla-s militia doing duty in town, viz., two shillings for drill and eightecnpence for patrol duty. The men have received one month’s pay and have been dismissed minus the rest. It does appear to me very absurd to offer to pay men for services which they willingly offered to perform without payment. But having refused the original terms, and placed the company on the same footing as the Auckland patrols it is but common honesty to pay them up to the day of discharge from active sen ice. There are some members of the corps to whom the balance of pay is no object, and who, as on the last occasion, w uld from the purest motives decline to receive it; bat there are others, labourers, apprentices &e., who, notwithstanding their previous offer of gratuitous service, really deserve to be paid quite as much as the militia of Auckland. I trust that the “ Defence Office,” for its own credit’s sake, will not push Us plans of retrenchment at the expense of justice and good faith. There has just been launched from the building yard of Messrs. Holmes, Brothers, North Shore, a handsome vessel, built specially for the Port Albert trade. She is a very strong and sightly boat, 47ft. keel, 16ft. Sn. beam, and 6ft. Sin. in depth of hold, and will oar.-y forty-seven tons. She is built to the order of Capt.mi Dodd, who has long found his little craft, the Progress, much too small for the growing trade between the Manukau and Port Albert. The new boat is well finished, Captain Dodd having spared no expense to render her a safe and convenient boat for' passengers and cargo. Her cabin is well fitted and has been handsomely grained by Messrs. Blakey & Son. She has been appropriately named the “ Advance of Kaipara,” and the Albertlanders may be congratulated upon the acquisition of so fine a vessel for their growing trade.

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New Zealander, New Zealander, Volume XIX, Issue 1995, 17 October 1863

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3,127

New Zealander New Zealander, Volume XIX, Issue 1995, 17 October 1863

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