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LOCAL EPITOME.

Hahvest is now over in all parts of the province. The crops of wheat have in most districts turned out lighter than they were expected to have done, the rains during the first week in December, while the wheat was in flower, having affected it with blight. In the Waipu district alone, a settlement of Nova Scitians under the Special Settlement system, the yield will, from this cause, be nearly 1200 bushtls less than it should have been. The hay crop has been, as might have been expected from such a season, a most plentiful one. We have not heard of any spread in the disease among the potatoes, which was predicted in the earlier part of the season. The crops of this plant are heavj, and a large breadth lias been planted. Altogether our agricultural resources lor the present ytar are satisfactory. Owing to the crowded state < f the Otago gold fields, and to the gradual falling off in the returns of gold, a large number of Victorian diggers have found their way to Auckland, and a fresh impetus, during the past month, has been given to the exploration for gold in the Coromandel district and in many other likely districts. The fact that gold in payable quantities exists here is so well known to our Auckland citizens, that no one ever calls the point in question ; but although within six hours' sail of the city, owing to the broken nature of the country, and the dense and tangled forests with which the greater part of the Coromandel district is covered, there are many obstacles which must necessarily affect the first prospecting in this locality. The Provincial Government, however, at the request of the Superintendent, has endeavoured to meet this difficulty by voting a sum of £SOO to assist approved parties of intending prospectors with tools and rations. It is to the quartz reefs we look as the chief source of the supply to the "Coromandel Escort," which must sooner or later, for it is only a matter of time, be established. The natives of the district, with the single exception of the owner of one small block of about 40,000 acres, are generally willing that the work of prospecting should go on, and as there are now many parties at work in the district, the Government has sent down Mr. Turton to facilitate the intercourse between the Europeans and the natives, the latter of whom, after all, do not, it appears, number more than 112 individuals throughout all Coromandel.

The present beautiful weather, which may still be expected to last another two months, is all that can be desired for the military operations of roadmaking at Mangatawinri. The accouuts from thecanpare highly satisfactory; the troops are in perfect health, the work is progressing last, and what is equally cheering, is the account of the cordial good will existing between the military and the natives. We hear of courteous invitations from the IVaikato chiefs to the various officers, for hunting, shooting, hiil rowing matches, which have been as courteously accepted. The Maori is a high bred, chivalrous gentleman, and in no case does he more prove his possession of this quality than in his manner of exercising the rites of hospitality. The very cases which occa-

sionally come before us, of an over-reaching, covetous disposition, are merely the practical rebukes which he shows towards those, who however useful they mav be to him in some particulars, the tmder and,"we must add in a few instances, the missionary, are the objects of his very natural contempt. The missionary loses respect with every acre of land which Jie acquires, and some count them by thousands. Tl:e business of the trader is to live by extortionate prices, by the introduction and sale, —and this is done in defiance of the law,—of ardent spirits, an evil which the Maori, while he is weak enough to yield to it, is quite able to see is opposed in practice to those the ries which it is the duty of the other to inculcate. It is the old, sad tale of giving the Bible with one hand and the rum bottle with the other, which has prevailed up to the present advent of Sir Geo. lirey ; and the comparatively small amount of injury which has been done to the Maori character by the prevalence of this evil, and the determination which he evinces to resist its introduction amongst his people by legislation and otherwise, speaks volumes in favour of the moral superiority of the Maoii. That he is as hmve in war as he is eourteousin peace, renders the completion of the present military work the mine desirable. We are now in the Province of Auckland, with such a line of defence, as Iree from the perils and horrors of war, shoull such an impMbible event take place, as a.e the citizens of Ohristohurch or Dunedin, in the southern island, and we should go about our usual in town and country, with as much unctneern as they would in Dublin and its nei«hb iinhood, while the "boys" werfi engaged in a faction fight in Tipperary. There have been several sales of real property during the past month, both in the city and the country districts, and still the price is upward! upward! Of course there is tlu usual cry with a good many, that this upward tendency of prices cannot last; but we remember that this equally the case six and sevi 11 years The prices which were considered enormous then for properties in the city, are such as would now be given for the same description of property in the suburbs. On the eleventh of February soms seventeen allotments, between Freeman's Bay and the city were parted with, at prices varying from £5 10s. to £1 17s. 6d., and the estate of Mr. Marston, situated at a distance of nearly three miles, sold in 01 small allotments, realized as much as from ss. 6d. to 245. per foot. Bush land, in its original state, altogether unimproved, situated on the Waiwera river, in the Wade district, was sold by the Messrs. Cock ran e for £2 7s. per acre, although distant nearly 25 miles from Auckland.

The Provincial Council still drags its slow length along. The estimates have been sent down, but the opposition have manifested a desire to question the reality of the assets. This arises, in very many cases, from sheer inability and from a want of educationon the part of the members to grapple with even so small a question, of finance as the management of the ii come of a province, which does not reach beyond £OO.OOO or £70,000. Under these circumstances it becomes an easy matter for a few members, who are at the head of the opposition, to so mystify and perplex the affair by the reports of a Finance Committee, of which they form the chief part, that after a little while not even themselves can understand it.

One of the chief topics of interest during the past month, has been the action taken by the people of this city in regard to the volunteer move, ment. The companies have been reformed and an impetus given which will, we trust, ultimately place this movement upon the footing which its importance demands. In New Zealand we have the double danger of foes from within as well as from without, and it is quite pos ible that the events in Europe, which would place the Australian colonies in danger from foreign aggression, would, by the withdrawal of the troops for home service, render us in this countrv liable 10 double danger. The knowledge of this well known fact would of itself subject us to the first attack, as being the weakest and least able to resist But at the same time we possess a country which, covered as it is with forests and mountains, sw mips- and mibridged rivers, might be held by resolute men, with the rifle, against forces far more numerous than are likely to be brought against us. It is not that these dangers are certain to arise, bvtt we never can tell the moment what they may, and then to prepare to meet the emergency would be too laU-. New Zealand is the cradle of the volunteer movement, and we feel a national pride in its success and advancement. Much remains however to be done. Already several of the wealthier portion of the community, whose age or infirmities, or whose public duties disqualify them (and no other consideration should exempt them) from active personal service, have enrolled themselves as honorary members of one or other of the city companies, and many more are about to follow an example which was first set by Sir George Grey himself.

I On Monday evening, the 24th of February, the . volunteers took upon themselves the/ garrison duties of the city, and the soldiers, then in barracks were the next day marched out to join their comrades at the camp at Drury. Long before the late war in New Zealand, long before the institution of volunteer rifles in England, our Auckland volunteers had shown the stuff of which they were made, and proved the efficiency of such a force in the struggle with the natives at the Bay of Islands, in 1845 ; and it was still prior to the organization of any rifle volunteers in Britain or her colonies that the very companies which now exist in Auckland were enrolled. Many alterations, however, in the internal arrangements of this force are necessary, if the movement is to proceed, and take a firm hold of the public mind. The existence of separate rifle corps, such as the Royal, City, Rutland, inc., is not, for many reasons, advisable. We would rather see the whole force enrolled as a battalion, governed by one set of regulations and bye laws, and not as now, with separate rules for each company. The uniform, too, which might well be provided by the Government, should be the same, and whatever honorary members are enrolled, should be enrolled in the battalion, and not in the various companies. Great dissatisfaction already exists, that one corps taking the initiative, should have employed certain of its members in canvassing for patronage, the benefit of which all feel should have extended to the whole force. Under the old regulations! one company, by the adoption of an expensive uniform and peculiar bye-laws, endeavoured to obtain for itself an exclusiveness, which after all, tended to its own downfall. Another company, under the present regulations, seems to be aiming at the same end. The enrolment of the whole force in one battalion, under one code of regulations, would at once do away with all those causes of jealousy which at the present moment operate against the popularity of the movement. It has been stated for some time past, that gold existed in the Papakura and Karaka districts. This was believed on the faith of Mr. Francis White, an old and respected citizen of Auckland, who was himself fortunate enough to pick up several specimens of gold upon the surface in that district, some few years ago. The Provincial Council has voted a sum of £SOO to be spent in affording assistance, by means of tools and rations, to experienced miners, who may be willing to prospect for gold in this proviuce; and a portion of the sum has been applied for, and granted to a party of men, who, under Mr. White's direction, are prepared to spend a couple of months in prospecting the district. The land in the neighbourhood of the spot believed to be auriferous, is either owned by Europeans or belongs to the Crown ; and should a gold field be discovered in this district, scarce thirty miles from Auckland, the thanks of the community will be due to Mr. White.

The Provincial Government, acknowledging the great benefit which would arise to this Province, could its rich gold fields (and we believe they are equally rich, if not more so than those of Victoria) be discovered, has offered a reward of £2OOO for the discovery of a gold field which shall have afforded a fair rate of wages to 500 men for three months. It is more than possible that such an offer will tempt one or other of the native proprietors of extensive tracts of land, where gold ia known to abound, to point out at

once a paying gold field, and allow of its being worked without interference, for the sake of claiming so large a sum. . Among the many improvements which, irom time to time, take place in Auckland, none are more noticeable than the substantial buildings which are springing up every year, on what, but a few years ago, was a mere unsightly mud flat at low water—the site of the famous Intake. It is not every one who is aware that the whole line of buildings, from the corner of Shortland Cresent to the Queen-street Wharf, is built beyond high water mark. Custom-house-street and Fort-street, constructed across the original harbour, are now all but connected by Commerce-street, which is nearly completed. The handsome three-story brick building of Mr. Graham, has now rilled up tire unsightlv gap between Mr. Webb's large Music Hall and the Metropolitan Hotel, in Queenstreet. Higher up Queen-street we have the handsome stone-faced building in course of con struction for the Savings Bank, and another fine building of Mr. Stannus Jones, whbh would be no discredit to Liverpool, or any of our large commercial towns at home, as a sale mart. Ihe City Building Act has caused all these new constructions to be made' of either brick or stone. It is curious to note, in the history of crimes, how frequently the commission of one species of offence is followed by a number of the same kind. Almost simultaneously with the arrival, of the intelligence of the assassination of Col. Crawford, at home, a similar act was committed here, at Wanganui, by Color Serjeant Collins upon his officer, Ensign Alexander. Collins has but just expiated his offence upon the gallows, when three more soldiers of the Artillery are about to undergo their trial at the Supreme Court, in Auckland, for the attempted assassination of Dr. Neill, of the 65th. Dr. Neill, who, we are sorry to hear, is still in a very precarious state, has so far recovered as to be .brought face to face with the accused, but cannot identify the men; indeed, he states that, the nature of the attack and the darkness of the night on which it took place, would entirely preclude the possibility of his identifying any one. "The, circumstantial and corroborative evidence is so strong against the prisoners, that the resident magistrate has not hesitated to commit them for trial, whatever may be the final lesult. Cricket, and vve are still more glad to see, boat ing, are amusements which engage the spare time of our young men. Amateur boat clubs on the Waitemata have been formed recently ; our oniy surprise is, that so magnificent an inland river should so long have been neglected for this amusement.

Whilst our young men are so engaged, their elders have been employed in the Council, deliberating how to expend the funds from properties held in trust for a future grammar school and college, many thinking that, since the sum is as yet insufficient to endow either college or school, that the money might be well spent in endowing one or more scholarships for the assistance of Auckland youths in graduating at Oxford or Cambridge : others again advocate the establishment of a school to meet the requirements of the middle classes in the Province. The matter is sit present under deliberation. Despite the call upon it by the immigration which kept up to a very fair average during the last twelve months, a large quantity of available land, of an excellent quality, extending over 350,000 acres, is in the hands of the Provincial Government. We are glad to be able to state this authoritatively, as it is so often represented, in interested quarters, that there is no scope for selection by emigrants on their arrival We have to record the occurrence of one of the fiercest gales, from the East and North-east, which we have experienced in Auckland for some years past. Several small craft in the coasting trade were more or less injured. The EmmaEliza and the Foam were both, sunk, and others were placed in great danger. The planking on the embankment of Customs-street, has been torn away for a space of 60 yards in length. The wind, which commenced blowing on Monday evening, and reached its height during the succeeding night, had considerably moderated towards day-break on Tuesday, otherwise a very considerable amount of damage must have been done to the street itself. POKINOE, MANG ATA WHIRL [From our Correspondent.] A most melancholy occurrence has taken place this day, in the vicinity of Dawson's residence, Razor-back, and which, I regret to inform you, resulted in the death of a fine young soldier, of the 40th, who was accidentally killed by the falling of a tree, when in the act of felling it. Three of his companions who were assisting were also badly wounded and mutilated. It appears that about two p.m. this day, the deceased, together with his comrades, were busily employed in felling a tree, which, notwithstanding their having used the greatest precaution, suddenly gave way, thereby crushing the deceased to atoms, and embedding the other poor fellows in the earth. Assistance was promptly rendered by Captain Shaw and party, and the deceased, together with the wounded men, were immediately removed to the hospital, where the latter remain at present in a very precarious state. A military investigation will be instituted into the sad occurrence by the Col. commanding- on the 27th inst., a full report of y hich I purpose sending you. The deceased, whose name was Burton, a native of Shropshire, was uuiversally esteemed by both officers, and men.

The weather is still beautiful, and the whole of the troops are prosecuting their works with greatest vigour. I have come to the opinion that a brief description of the Pokinoe Camp, &c., would be acceptable to many of the numerous readers of the New Zealander, and in order that they may form some idea of the manner in which we are situated here,.l beg to submit the following few particulars. The camps of the 12th and 14th regiments are pitched on the Cranbourn Farm (Austin's), immediately fronting Mr. T. C. Hallamore's property (Allandale), and, being in the vicinity of the native, or Maori villages of Pokinoe, Tuakau, Waikato, and Paparoa, their inhabitants (the Maories) profit by the occasion, as they drive a most profitable trade in disposing of their produce, viz.:—pigs, oats, wheat, maize, peaches, potatoes, grapes, apples, onions, pumpkins, melons, and horses to the troops. The consumption of the articles enumerated is amazing, and should be seen to be believed. The pertinacity with which the Maories push their trade is truly remarkable, and the scenes that occur daily afford a deep fund of amusement. Outside the post and rail fence (Allandale), which divides the camp ground from the road, is a large clear space, this is termed the Maori market, being the spot selected for them by Col. Sir James Alexander, K.C.8., L.S., and from dewy morn till dusky eve it is occupied by Maories of both sexes, and of all ages and sizes, each provided with some saleable commpdity. The peaches are sold very cheap, and as they are now ripe, afford a wholesome and refreshing treat for the soldiers. The efforts of the Maories and soldiers to hold converse with each other, by means of signs and a kind of jargon coined for the occasion, is highly entertaining. Occasionally, when giving change, the arithmetical powers of the Maori fail him,, and the Hoia, kindly trying to assist by signs, &c., only confuses him more; both parties then repair, by mutual consent, to the tent of the military interpreter, Lieutenant Bates, 65th regt., who arranges the difficulties satisfactorily. Mr. Bates is very much respected by the Maories, and his zeal and intelligence go far to increase and preserve the good feeling and confidence which at present exists between the troops and natives in this district. I may add, that there are several Maories in the aforesaid villages who are well educated, and who speak and write the English language fluently, and, to speak honestly and fairly of them, set an excellent example to'their European friends, as upon no account whatever will a Maori be found to commit a desecration of the Sabbath, or perform any servile work on that day. On the contrary, they devoutly attend their place of worship. '1 hey are a strictly moral race of Christians, and it must be gratifying to the poor, missionary, notwithstanding, the vast amount of privation that he has been subjected to, to find that his labour has not been in vain. What a pleasure it is to behold such a superior race of people, who a few years ago were wild barbarians, attend and conform to the tenets of the Bible, and sing with pious and sincere hearts glory and praise to Jehovah. The missionaries have done their duty well in this colony, notwithstanding the reflections and aspersions cast upon them by unprincipled and inexperienced men; and had the New South Wales and Queensland colonists been blessed with such zealous and persevering servants of the Most High, the Wills' tragedy, near Hockhampton, would never have occurred. But unfortunately some of our brother colonists are of opinion, that their hearths and homesteads are unsafe unless the whole of the unfortunate aborigines of a colony be exterminated. What an incorrigible crime against the law

of the Most High, as well as against the tnie prmciple of onr gracious Sovereign's rule, to shoot poor ignorant beings like wild beasts or game in the forest. I have seen myself, in'the river Mary, Queensland scores of their dead bodies floating in the stream, and have known the local authorities of that borongh refuse \ holding an investigation into the cause of such a course of conduct on the part of the officials. The only explanation afforded by the ruthless perpetrator of the atrocious coudtict already described was. that the natives had stolen a few sheep from a neighbouring functionarv. For further particulars as to the veracity of the above assertion, I would respcct.'ully refer your readers to the columns of the Moreton Bay Courier of the months of February and March, 1860. It is a well known fact to all old residents of the sister colonies, that the natives, when fairly and properly treated by the settlers, have invariably proved themselves friendly and kind creatures, and would unquestionably become, even now, an intelligent and industrious portion of the Australian community. Their generosity and friendship towards thj3 European has been fully illustrated and borne out recently in harbouring and protecting the companion of the unfortunate, but ever memorable explorer, O'Hara Burke (King), in the desert of Carpentaria. The line of conduct and general policy introduced by our worthy Governor towards the native race of this colony deserves the consideration of every honest minded Chrstian, as 'ere many years the Maori and pakeha will walk hand in hand, and consider themselves sheep of the same fold. < )ur Governor's intentions towards them are pure and honorable, and deserve the support of all members of the community, and in unison with all well-wishers of New Zealand, I will say "Persevere, Sir George, in the good work that you have begun; educate the Maories, send the Missionaries among them, open up the roads of the interior, and, when your soul shall have gone to that bourne from whence no traveller returns, the then existing population —both Maori and European—wiirshed tears of regret in commemoration of your never-to-be-forgotten memory." The prevention of the disposal of spirituous and fermented liquors in this district has accomplished great service to the inhabitants, and the thanks of the community are due to the originator of so wholesome a measure. Mr. Fitzherbcrt, who keeps a store in front of the Pokinoc Camp, purposes giving a very valuable bridle and saddle as a prize to be contended for by Maories alone, and already seven of. the Waikatos have entered their horses, and propose appearing in full jockey costume. The day fixed for the race to come off is-Saturday, the 15th of next month. Consequently we are in expectation of having a grand gala day, as I make no doubt the gallant colonel will grant his well conducted troops half a day's grace, in order that they may enjoy the amusement. Attached, I forward you a description of Herr Werner's new Fantasia, or "One Day at the Camp," as performed by the various members of the Band of the 14th on the evening of the 27ih. The Fantasia has been fully borne out in all its phases, and its composition reflects the greatest credit on Mr. Werner. The following placard of the entertainment was posted at the Camp:— "Herr Werner's new Fantasia, 'One Day at

the Camp.' " Description.—lntroduction, with Imitation of the Bugle Calls: Ist. Alarm. 2nd Assembly, and-Double Time.—Galop, in which the Steel Harmonium is introduced.—Fantasia Solo tor the Clarionet.—Polka. —Song and Quartctto, 'Come when my love lies dreaming.'—7oth Call. —The Regiment marching out, which is imitated with different Marches or Melodies, harmonised together and intermixed with Bugle Calls, as Cease Firing, Commence Firing, Incline, Advance, Close, 40th Call, 12th, Wheel, Officer's Call, 70th Call, Retire, —Song, ' The Flowers of the Forest,' ' O Rowan Tree,' or ' Thou'lt aye be dear.' —Waltz.— Song,' The murmur of the Shell,' ' Distress me with these . tears no more,' ' See the Conquering Hero,' ' Durando and Belermo.'—Finale. —Great Bravour for the Solo Clarionette. —Also, the new March, 'Dixey's Land at Pokeno,' by Herr Werner." —The success of the piece was complete, and its performance, which afforded great satisfaction to the large audience, composed of the men of the 12th and 14th Regiments, off duty, officers from the other camps, and many of the neighbouring settlers, reflects great credit upon *he composer—the talented leader of the Band of H.M.'s 14th Regiment. The tent of Colonel Galloway, of the 70th, situated at Baird's Farm, was burglariously entered on the evening of the Ist instant, and two gold watches and a dressing-box containing a very valuable gold locket and several other articles were stolen therefrom.

The Auckland Choral Society.—Handel's Messiah was performed on the evening of 13th nit. by the Choral Society, at the.Odd Fellows' Hall, to a crowded audience ; the Governor, Sir George Grey, being present. The Solos were taken ■by members of the Society ; for the most part, with good taste and efficiency. The Choruses were generally well rendered, though here and there a little unsteadiness was noticeable. For instance, the first few bars of " Lift up your heads,''were taken up by the upper voices without the decision which could have been wished ; and there was not sufficient attention paid to the forte Chorus which follows the Cshould be) semi-chorus, at the words J" He is the King of Glory." The same [ remark applies to the Chorus '• For unto us a Child is born.'' Those who have been at the Sacred Harmonic Oratorios will recollect the grand effect of the full body of voices and instruments at the " "Wonderful : Councillor :" whereas on Thursday evening tb,e full volume had been already obtained two or three times by crescendos on the words " And the Government shall be upon his shoulder." Costa's rule is ; " All piano till the word Wonderful." The Chorus "The Lord gave the Word," was really well done. This, and . the " Hallelujah Chorus," were the two best of the evening. Of -the Solos, " I know that my Redeemer liveth" was certainly the gem. The audience, in spite of all rule or precedent, could not help applauding. This singer's full mellow voice and unaffected style renders her a most pleasing singer of that kind of music, where merit consists in the beauty of its melody, and not in its difficulty of execution. Mr. Reid, as usual, sang his solos carefully,and with ease. •' Thou shalt break them with a rod of' iron," should surely be taken andante not adagio, and a little more spirit might be given to the energetic words "break" and "dash." Mr. Cochrane was evidently nervous in his earlier solos, but gained confidence as he went on, and sang "Why do the nations?'' with great effect. The plaintive and feeling rendering of" He was despised," deserves much praise. Two or three little errors of time must be excused, as the singer took the part at a- very short notice. "He shall feed his . flock," was rendered with much sweetness and precision, and the . inspiring melody, " But thou didst not leave his soul in hell," was very fairly sang, but the clear bell-like voice of the latter was peculiarly effective in "Lo, the angel of the Lord." The "Pastoral Symphony" was executed with really good taste.; indeed the stringed band of the Society is, (to use a Colonial or Yankee expression),'" All there" with the work it has to do. Mr. Beale had been engaged to assist the Society,|and some persons were wrath thereat, Indeed, we understand that for that reason Mr. Carleton resigned, and left the Society; but we are glad to be able to announce that Mr. Hugh Coolahait, on the other hand, has offered himself for election. There * need be little fear entertained in future of the prosperity of the Society, as it now possesses the hearty and united abilities of two of the most eminent professional men in the Colony, as leaders of the vocal and instrumental departments. Qceen-street Pump.—We congratulate our thirsty fellow-citizens and the public generally that a temporary pump is now erected over the well lately sunk by the Provincial Government opposite the Bank of New Zealand.

Cholera.—Our cotemporary the Southern Cross very properly draws attention to-the fact that cholera hasappearet in Adelaide. This, however, is not the most probable port from which that disease might be communicated to this country. We are sorry 10 have it to state that cases of cholera have occured in Newcastle, New South Wales, between which place and Auckland there is a frequent communication. Death by Drowning.—On Thursday evening, 13th ultimo, a youth sixteen years of age, the only son of M. Schottler, cabinet-maker, was bathing in the Waitemata near the hulk, and when nearly out of his depth was swept off his legs by the tide. Attempts were made to save him by his companions but in vain, and the unfortunate young man was not able to swim. The same evening the serjeant-major of the Police took assistance down, and after some little diffiulty on account of the rocky nature of the river bottom at ttitt spot* succeeded in recovering the body. Ox Wednesday afternoon, 12th uit., two prisoners at the Mount Eden Stockade, who were working in charge of an overseer named made a rush for it. Scott, however, fired and brought down one of the men. The other passed up the road, took over a stone fence, and passed to the back of Sir. Bleazard's factory, hiding in the fern and scoria; he was, however, recaptured by Scott the same evening. Both were, we understand, military prisoners, and the man shot (Murphy) was under a sentence ol 10 years. The ball passing through'-his aim, entered his side. Band of Hove. - The annual festivity for our Auckland juveniles came off on the 13th ult. A more beautiful day could have been chosen, and the children, who mustered over a thousand, bearing appropriate banners, and preceded by our Volunteer Band, appeared as they passed through the town to to

thoroughly prepared to make a " day of it." An appropriate address was delivered to them by Mr. Cornford at the Odd Fellow's Hall preparatory to starting, and as they passed the Government Gardens, His Excellency, who is ever forward to encourage {rood works, came o"ut with Mr. Layard to view them. The children cheered, the Governor waived his hat, and the procession moved forward in great glee to the Domain, where the remainder of the day was devoied to innocent amusements, some of he elder boys resorting to cricket. Ample store of provisions was available, and the children returned to Barrack-square at six in the evening and separated, having first sung " Cheer boys cheer" and " God save the Queen," and concluded with three hearty cheers for the Queen and His Excellency. BcrglArt.—-House-keepers beware! On Sunday 23rd tilt, the house of Mr. Lockwood (lMnceof Wales Inn) in Hobson-strect was forcibly entered by a back window, dnring-the absence of Mr. and Mrs. Lockwood at Church. The drawers and other places were ransacked, and property abstracted therefrom. The thieves on leaving the house left the window in q lestion partly propped up by an empty bottle. It therefore ■ behoves every householder to keep a bright | look out. Among the many local improvements which are occurring in our city, none are more conspicuous than those in Fort-street. Within the recollection of many the appearance of this street was such as might have led anyone, curious enough to enter it, into the belief that it'was under the protection of the High Court of Chancery, so desolate was its appearance. The recent handsome three-story brick building, which has just been erected bv Mr. G. S. Graham, connects the fine Music Hall of Mr. Webb's with the Metropolitan Hotel at the corner of Fort and Queen-street filling up the unsightly gap. The cross street (Commerce) leading from Custom House-Street to Fort-street is, we see, also nearl)' formed. Cricket.—A match at this noble game was recently played between the good folks of Mahurangi and Matakana. It was closely contested, Mahurangi scoring 39 in the first 105 in the second innings, total 144. Matakana 90 in the first 57 second innings, total 147, thus winning by three runs. The War in the North or New Zealand.— We have to acknowledge receipt of a copy of this work, published by Mr. Chapman, Queen-street. It is a nicely printed pamphlet of fifty-two pages. New Zealand Literature. —We have received from the publisher, Mr. G. W. Woon of Taranaki, a copy of an "Epitome of the Geography of New Zealand" by Mr. C. A. C. Beardsworth, master of the High School, Taranaki. This work, which is well adapted for the use of schools, is divided into a physical, political, historical, and descriptive account of the Colony, and has already reached a second edition. The use of this little manual on New Zealand will be a valuable addition to the course of geography taught in the different schools in this country. Disobedience to Parents—Boy Drowned.—< )n the 7th ultimo, a coroner's inquest was held at the Freemen's Bay Inn, on view of the body of John T. Dickinson, who was drowned on the preceding day, under the following circumslances:--Deceased, who was a fine boy-of 10J years, went to bu,the in opposition to the express command of his mother, and waded out to a dingy in which there was another boy; the boys cast the,dingy loose which began to drift into deep water. Deceased becoming alarmed leaped out and immediately sank. Master Alfred Matthews, a lad of 13 years-who happened to be bathing near the spot, with a courage superior to his age, immediately undressed and swam off to the rescue of deceased, whose hand he laid hold of, but the unfortunate child in his agony, clung .to his person so closely as to completely prevent him swimming; and to oblige him to disengage himself,' in order to save his own life. A native named Hoani, then swam off and brought deceased to 6hore, but in an apparently lifeless state Mr. Matthews', surgeon, 'father of the above youth, was sent for and promptly attended, but so much time had elapsed that all the.cxertions made for restoration was unavailing. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidently Drowned" and highly commended the conduct of Master Matthews and the native, to the latter of whom they considered that a suitable present should be awarded by Government. Publtc Market.—The want of a market for the sale of all kinds of agricultuial produce, &c, has been long felt in this city. We are glad to be able to inform our readers and the" public, that an address has been presented by the Council to the Superintendent, requesting him to place a sum of £3O on the supplementary estimates for the best design and plan of a building for this purpose. Accident to McGhee's Oneiiunga Mail Van. On the 15th u\t, as this vehicle was coming down Coffee's Hill on the one side of which is a deep and dangerous cutting, it overtook a cart loaded with iron bars the driver of which did not hear the call from the van in sufficient time to draw to his own side before the latter came up. As it happened the end of a piece of iron lying transversely across the cart projected in front of the face of one of the horses in the van both of which swerved to the right and the van, horses and passengers, some 14 in number, were precipitated over the cutting. Providentially, out of so many, no one but the driver; Mr. McGhee, was seriously hurt, and we regret to : say that he has received a very severe bruising by the van falling over upon his loms ; had not a case however fallen underneath with him by which the weight-of the van was partly sustained, he must have been crushed to death. No blame whatever attaches to the driver, the roadjis so narrow that there is scarcely room for two carts to pass without risk at any time; This spot and the roadway in the Kyber pass have : both been the scenes of similar accidents. We would call the attention of the Provincial Council to to this really public requirement, and suggest that where so much time can be found for party squabbling, a little might be fairly allotted to the discussion of the necessity of such 'alteration, as might lead to the possibility of their fellow citizens travelling on this road without the liability of risking life and limb in future

The Prize Kifles.—Owing to the new formation of the force, the four prize rifles given by the Messrs. Hebbert will not be shot for so soon as was intended. The whole of the present Volunteer force will be entitled to compete, and, to enable them to do so, the time for sending in their names, as competitors, has been extended to the last day of March.

The Waitemaxa Boat Club.—We arc happy to find that the young men of this City have succeeded in establishing a Chib of this nature. It is a remark which we have often heard made, that though Auckland possesses so fine a river, there are fewer pleasure and pulling boats, and less aquatic amusements here, than in any other place in the world. It is satisfactory to find jhat this state of things is not to continue. The Waitemata Club musters strongly, and is supported by many, who though unable constitutionally, or from business avocations, to join in the amusement, have given in their names as honorary members. This manly 3 , athletic exercise, the prevalence of which in our public schools and universities at home has done incalculable service in bringing out the hardiness and daring of a class, who but for such training might have sank into a state of luxurious effeminacy, will doubtless work the same happy result for the youth of Auckland.' Not the least dangerous of those evils which menace the national characteristic of the English at home and in the Colonies—his dogged endurance and resolution—is the falling off in the practice of those athletic, manly games, which have assisted so materially in the formation and maintenance of his national character.

Royal Company, Auckland Volunteers.—On the 10th ultimo, a meeting of the above corps took place in the Mechanics' Institute, when thirty members being present, the business of the meeting, the election of their officers, was commenced. Capt. F. E. Campbell was nominated as Captain, and Messrs W. Howell j and B. Tonks as Ist and 2nd Lieutenants respectively. As the corps is still in process of formation, and as it may be expected that many more, will join as members during the next week or ten days; only two Serjeants, Messrs D. Tole and W. Coombe, and two Corporals, Messrs J. F. Nau,ghton and J. Leech were elected, in order to give those now about to. join the opportunity of either being themselves elected, or at any rate of taking a part in the appointment of two more Sergeants and Corporals at a future meeting. The Ist and 2nd Lieutenants and the Secretary were appointed a committee, either of whom will be competent to recommend intending members to the Commanding Officer for admission into the Royal Company. As this is the first of the New Volunteer Companies whichhas as yet proceeded to the election of its officers, these gentlemen will take precedence of the officers of other Volunteer Corps, as does the Royal Company itself over the other companies. ~ ™. , •■ Royal Company, VolusteerS. - Oil Wednesday, 24th ult„ this Company met at the Mechanics' Institute for the election of the remainder of their noncommissioned officers, when Messrs. H. N. W arner and J. Leech were nominated 3rd and 4th Sergeants, Messrs. Waymouth, Hassan, and Cameron, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Corporals, and Mr. H. J. H. Elliot, Lance Corporal. Mr. Henry Ridings was nominated Treasurer. As the question of providing uniform, for the Volunteers is likclv to come before the General Assembly, in order that it may be undertaken by the Government, it was thought advisable not to enter definitely into the subject, more especially that by so doing, those desirous of joining this corps may be enabled to do so without being subjected to any expanse whatever at entrance. The Company musters at the present time nearly 60 members. VicrroHiA Company, A. R. meeting of this Company took place in the Odd Fellows Hall on

Monday, 24th ult., when several new members were enrolled, and the company proceeded to the election of their officers. Mr. Fredk. Sims was nominated Captain, and Mr. Jas. Derrom and Win. Waddel, Ist and 2nd. Lieatenants respectively. The following Sergeants were elected:—Messrs. Litany, Thompson, Healy, and Ohlson, and Messrs. Edwd. F. Tole, Jas. Wood, Christopher Berry, and Thos. Resden, were nominated as Corporals, Before separating the meeting adopted the rules of the original Victoria Company. The Garrison.—On Monday evening, the 24th tilt., the garrison duty of this city was transferred from the 65th regiment"to the Auckland Rifle Volunteers, who have now taken the various guards. The I force now musters nearly 300, wilh fresh recruits continually being enrolled. Next day, at 5 p.m., they paraded in the Albert Barrack Square for drill and inspection, their band being present and playing a variety of popular music. There was a goodly sprinkling of inhabitants to witness the manoeuvres. At 3 p.m. the detachment of the 65th regiment, relieved by the Rifles, marched from the Albert Barracks for Otahuhu, en route for Drury. About a company of sick and non-effectives have been left behind. The Attack on Dr. Neill.—On 24th ult., at the Resident Magistrates' Court, the three, men, John Laycock, William Edwards, and Charles Nibbs, charged with stabbing Dr. Neill, were brought up for final examination. Mr. Wynn couducted the prosecution, and Mr. Beveridge the defence. The particulars of this case have, from the frequent recommittals of the accused, been so often before the public, that we need scarcely enter into them at length. Ihe prosecutor stated that, owing to the nature o' the attack and the darkness of the night, he cou'd not identify the persons who attacked them; but the envelope dropped by the prisoner Edwards and picked up by Corporal Mahon, was identified, and the prosecutor swore to the fact that it was one of the articles taken from him during the attack. There was, however, circumstantial evidence of so strong a nature against the prisoners, that they were fully committed for -trial at the approaching Criminal Scsim of the Supreme Court, till which time the prisoners' counsel, Mr. Beveridge, reserved their defence.

• Matakana.— A soiree, largely attended, was held in the schoolroom, in this place, on the 19th ultimo. After tea Mr. Hudson, of the Weslcyan chapel, Mahurangi, was, on the motion of the Rev. R. McKinney, called to the chair. On taking the chair, Mr. Hudson offered some appropriate remarks, called upon Captain Mucklejohn, who, in an exceedingly interesting speech, delighted the meeting with a sketch of his life, especially his adventures, all the world over, in search of a home, from the time of his leaving the frozen clime of Prince Edward's Island, until his final settlement on the sunny shores of New Zealand. Mr. Grimner next addressed the meeting, in a fervid manner, recommending to the people the cultivation of personal religion; after whom Dr. Cruickshank. in a lucid style, spoke of the atmospheric air, and its influence upon the vital functions, shewing, as connected with this, the wisdom and benevolence of the Supreme Being. The Chairman then called upon the Rev. R. McKinney, who endeavoured to impress upon parents, the necessity of securing for their children the benefits of education, shewing them how sadly, in his opinion, this matter was neglected in the out-districts of New Zealand. A vote of thanks, moved by Mr. McKinney, and seconded by Mr. Chrisp, having then been passed" to the ladies, who had gratuitously provided the tables for the evening's entertainment, Mr. Munro, to whom, as was known beforehand, and as his speech evinced, the task appropriately fell,retnrned thanks on the ladies'account. After some pieces of Sacred Music had been beautifully sung by a choir, who had been in training for the occasion for some time before, the business of the evening was concluded by a vote of thanks to the Chairman, who dismissed the meeting with devotional exercises. Thus passed over in a happy manner, the first Soiree held in Matakana, and though none of the Auckland brethren, who were expected, favoured the meeting with their presence, the audience felt that there was nothing wanting to add to the pleasure of the evening's entertainment. The building in which the Soiree was held is a schoolroom, lately erected, in a central place, on two acres of land, one of which was kindly granted for the purpose by Mr. Denriison of Matakana, and the other by Dr. Mitchell of Sydney. The building is placed in connection with the Presbytery of Auckland, and is erected as well for the education of youth, as in the meantime for a place of worship, and it is pleasant to know that the proceeds of the soiree put it in a fair way of getting . clear of debt.—Correspondent.

THE VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT. Whatever be the grievances of which the Auckland Volunteer Rifles have cause to complain, it is gratifying to know that, at the call of duty, their only consideration has been how, by prompt obedience and fbrgetfulncss of wrong, their Queen and country may best be served. Such conduct is worthy of a volunteer force, which, aiter the maimer of Her Majesty's 39th regiment, is fairly entitled to the distinctive badge " Primus in Australis." Without adverting to their gallant and efficient services in the former New Zealand war, it can never be put too prominently forward, that the present force was organized, and their arms purchased long before volunteer rifles were known either in Great Britain or any other part of Australia, an 4 that not with the object of controlling a ibe within, but of doing battle with and strengthening the arras of England against any foe that might menace from vithout. Looking, then, at the fact that our young men were the movers of their own organization, bearing in mind the " good service" they have since rendered, we cannot but commend them for the high and honourable manner in which they have again taken service, casting their grievances to the winds, in hopeful confidence that past apathy and cold discouragement will give place to a generous recognition and cordial appreciation of their worth. There has been something radically wrong, as well as something intolerably oppressive, not merely in the volunteer, but in the militia organization: and it is, thercfi re, matter of little surprize that dissatisfaction and disgust should have been engendered. In theteeth of these, the answer given to General Cameron's application for volunteers to perform garrison duty was an acclamatory affirmation. In 1860, when we were recklessly hurried into war, and when the militia were sailed upon, there was neither lukewarm ness nor skulking on the part of the citizens of Auckland. Then, there were more men at command than muskets wherewith to arm them; a supplemental force, moreover, of some two hundred turned out with arms purchased at their own individual expense. Facts such as these are the best replies to every traducer of the New Zealand colonists, whether here, in England, or elsewhere. Need we revert to the martial display in the Albert Barrack Square, on the 24th May, 1860, whed eleven hundred men, infantry and cavalry, paraded in honour of Her Majesty's birth-day, of whom but fifty were regular troops ? At that time there was no lack of enthusiasm in the hearts of our freemen: if it was subsequently quenched, if men were driven by hundreds from the colony, because of first discharging them and then persecuting them to re-enroll themselves in the militia, the defection was attributable not to a fickle people, but to a blundering and arbitrary Government, who drove them from the ranks into which they they had first freely and frankly entered. Of the volunteer grievances we are ignorant; but of the persecutions and oppressions, of the cold-blooded apathy and wanton tyranny with which the militia were! treated, we are fully cognizant, and we only adduce them as probable explanations of the state of disorganization into which the volunteers had fallen, and of their unwillingness to re-enroll, until every cause of complaint was instantaneously forgotten at the call of duty. When the present emergency shall have passed, it is earnestly to be hoped that both volunteers and militia will be constituted upon such a system as may ensure the cordial approval of both arms of a service on which the colony must sooner or later materially rely. Great stress has been laid on the marked favour and generous appreciation with which the volunteer movement'has been greeted in our fatherland; and bitter contrasts have been drawn respecting the indifference that has been manifested towards it here— here, where during ihe last two years it was impossible to say when it might be brought face to face with a foe. No fair hands have woven colours to do them honour—no bugles, wherewith to sound the advance, have been presented —even their band, ready to contribute to every public enjoyment, has been raised, trained, and provided with music and musical instruments, under many and pressing difficulties. These are keen and spirit trying discouragements, and as they are of easy remedy," we trust that they will give place to a higher order of affairs. "With respect to colours, as tHc rifle volunteers arc at present constituted in companies instead of battalions, we think there is both an anomaly and a difficulty of presentation. Surely a battalion, clothed and equipt alike, ought to be preferable, posses more esprit de corps, and work with greater homeogenity than independent companies dressed in different uniforms, and destitute of that centrality of which the colours arc at ouce the focus and the rallying point ? At this juncture, the future of our rifle volunteers, volunteer cavalry, and militia, is a matter not of pass--in<T, ■ but of lasting consideration. Every endeavour should be made to render these services popular and attractive, and, by consequence, effective. As respects the volunteers, a want of regimental funds has been found to be an insurmountable drawback. Many of the most desirable of our citizens would enrol, were they furniehed with free uniforms and cquipmeats. It has

been suggested that the Government should supply these. But is there not a more genuine volunteer means by which the same end could be obtained ? The universal popularity which volunteers have commanded in Great Britain is because the force comprises two, if not three classes, all deeply interested in its honour and success. The first class embraces the young and effective, fit for service in the field; the second class is constituted of old, infirm, and disabled men; and the third of high-spirited ladies, who, as well as the second class, are enrolled as honorary members of particular corps, on annual pavment of a moderate subscription, by means of which a regimental fund is at once established, and a real interest in the progress and prosperity of the corps created. Are there not in New Zealand many such exempts ? —members of the General Assembly ?—members of the Provincial Council ?—and men whose hearts are in the right place, though their limbs may be unequal to the work ? Surely there are; and surely, from such, a corps of honorartts might be organized, whose annual contributions might do much to promote the efficiency of the woiking branches of the service. It was, no doubt, with some such object i n view, that honorary membership was introduced in Great Britain. It it were found desirable or beneficial there, it can be no less desirable and beneficial here; and it would testify to all false accusers that all classes are intent and energetic in their own defence, as well as in their country's cause - our young men by taking up arms—and our o id men and ladies by contributing fluids to enable them to do so with the greatest efficiency.

VOLUNTEER MEETING. Thk meeting of Volunteers and Others called by Colonel Balueavis, was held in the Mechanics' Institute on Monday, 17th ultimo. So crowded was the Hull that the platform even at the back of the chair was occupied by the audience, amongst whom were many of the leading men of this city. Colonel Balneavis stated in a few words the matter which he had to communicate; he had been informed officially by the General that that officer was desirous to complete the road on which the military are now engaged before the winter sets in, that to do so he would require two hundred additional men, and that he therefore wished to know whether the Auckland Volunteers would take upon themselves the garrison duty of this city, in order that the soldiers thus at present engaged" might be sent out to the camp. Mr. Daldy was then called to the chair. Mr. Firth addressed the meeting at some length, after which he moved the first rcsoltion, which was seconded by Mr. Cocauane, and carried unanimously:— " That it is the duty of the people of the city and province of Auckland to provide a Volunteer Force sufficient to take the garrison duty, and carry out the requirements of His Excellency the Governor :md the Hon. the Lieutenaut-Gcneral commanding the forces." Mr. Daldy, although chairman, by the consent of the meeting, proceeded to read the second resolution, which was seconded by Mr. Lee, and carried unanimously: "That this meeting desires to record its grateful thanks to Her Majesty's Government for the prompt assistance afforded in the time of need, and are ready to supplement their efforts by every endeavour in their power?' Mr. ; Daldy, .in a very happy and eloquent speech, touched with a : grateful recollection on the prompt and vigorous measures with which the Imperial Government had come forward at a time when our situation was indeed one of danger, and with men and money had so strengthened the position of this Province that we had been spared, the evils and misfortunes of war; nor did he omit to pay a well-merited compliment to the brotherly kindness of our Australian fellow-colonists who never lor a moment hesitated to take- upon themselves the very duty wWh the Auckland Volunteers were now called upon to undertake, in order that the last man of the regular forces then garrisoning their cities might be sent, to our immediate assistance. The city of Auckland was, he proceeded to state, the cradle of the Volunteer movement, which had now become a national institution in every part of the British empire. Not only had we, within the last, five years, shewn the example which had been so largely followed at home, but twenty years ago,, when there was no more than eighty regular troops in the country, and when we were menaced by a body of five thousand natives near at hand, a little company of Volunteers, composed of many who were now the most respected and useful of our citizens, were nightly patrolling the streets and outskirts of the infant city. Later still, when the war at the Bay of Islands broke out in 1845, who were among the most forward and useful of the troops ? The Auckland Volunteers. This movement, then, was one of no recent date, and he trusted that, by their response to the call of their country in its need, the citizens of Auckland would show that the same spirit which had aroused the earlier settlers so cheerfully to perform those military duties twenty years ago, still animated the breasts of the present generation. There was another point to which he wished to allude—the part which employers and men of capital were bound in duty to perform with regard to this movement. Their stake in the country was great, and it was their duty, as it should be their inclination, not only to encourage the formation of volunteer companies directly by their influence and wealth, but to encourage those under them to enroll, by ungrudgingly yielding up the services of their employes when those men were required toperform the military duties of parade, drill, and guard, which were the necessary consequences of their enrollment;

The third resolution was proposed by Mr. Fisk and seconded by Mr. Lee, to the effect " That the Regulations published by the General Government in the whole are satisfactory, but require alteration in detail." •Mr. Fisk, in speaking to the resolution, stated his willingness not only to accept this duty, but even to take all guard duty on this side of Otahuhu. This resolution was also carried rieni con. The fourth resolution was proposed by Mr. J. M, Clark, and seconded by Mr. Stewart, and carried unanimously:— ,■ "That in order to render the corps efficient and permanent, it is necessary to have a thorough reorganisation as regards the management of the force. But as only enrolled Volunteers ought to have a voice in such reorganisation, all persons desirous of rendering that service to the country which is required in the present emergency, should' at once connect themselves with one or the other of the companies now in course of formation, or form new companies; after which delegates (say five from each company) should be selected for the purpose of drawing up a complete code of regimental regulations." A vote of thanks was then passed to the chairman, and Colonel Balnkatis camertorward and stated that he was happy that he should now be enabled to write to the General a satisfactory answer to his application, as he had now no doubt that on Tuesday and Wednesday • (this day) the citizens would readily come forward, and that a sufficient number—some hundred and fifty additional members—would be sworn in, so that he might conscientiously declare to the General that he was in a fit position to undertake the duty asked.. Before the meeting separated thirty additional members were, we believe, sworn in. » THE RIFLE VOLUNTEERS AND THE GARRISON GUARD. Cn Monday evening last the Garrison duties of this city, for the second time, passed into the hands of our Rifle Volunteers. As the premier company, the Royals furnished the first gnard, and were deployed for duty in the Albert Barracks at 7 o'clock" p.m. We had hoped to see, after the general meeting of Volunteers held on Monday last, a large accession to our volunteer force. We wish we could now state that our expectations had been realised. To perform the garrison duty of this city will require about 25 men, each 24 hours; it necessarily follows that, with the present force of 276 men, each man's turn will come round once in twelve days. Laying aside this man's or that man's opinion of the Government regulations, we put it to the peopb of Auckland, if it is either fair or honourable to shift the duties, which clearly belong to all, upon the shoulders of a few. We do not think, when they look at the matter in this light, that they will allow the possibility of such a slur being cast upon their manliness to remain for a moment. More particularly would we call the attention of the wealthier class to the duty whi hj devolves upon them in giving their support to this movement in their own persons, and by the encouragement they are able to afford to those dependent on them. The remarks which Capt. Daldy rnade the other evening on this point are worthy of consideration, and unless every facility is afforded by the employers of the young men in this city, the volunteer movement cannot proceed as it ought to do. Loud exception was taken at that meeting by one fluent speaker, who usually sacrifices largely upon the altar of bunkum, to the speech of " Canon Stowell," but let the people of Auckland beware, not so much of the strictures of persons at a distance as of allowing their own deeds of omission to rise up in judgment against them. It is very well for the British Lion to roar and lash his tail when stirred up at a public meeting, but if his ordinary demeanour is that of a slinking cur turning aside from everv. danger with a whine, his character is more likely to be ;- from the less honourable point of view, and not unjustly. Instead of -276, the number of members of the corps should have amounted by this time to

more than double the number. " Bis dat qui cito dat," and he who at once comes forward with his service to the country, not only fulfils hjs duty to that country, but lightens the labour of his fellow citizens, on whom, because they are willing and ready, he ought [not in justice to allow the whole burthen to remain. There are many who prefer to remain in the Militia, but there are no reasons why they should not as such, volunteer to share in the above duty.—N. Z., Feb. 26.

PAPAKURA PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. The annual general meeting of the members and adherents of the Presbyterian Church, in the United ! Congregation of Papakura, Drury, Wairoa, Wainku, ; and Pukekohe, was neld in the above church on Monday, the 17th ult., at 3 p.m., the Rev. T. Norrie, minister of the congregation, in the chair. Notwithstanding the unfavourable weather, there was ft good attendance from the three principal districts. Mr. Win. Hay, the general secretary of the congregation, read the report for the year 1861, which showed a sure though gradual progress, notwithstanding the unsettled state of the districts during the past two years. From the report it appeared that the sum of £249 9s. had been received as church revenue during the past year, inclusive of a grant of £3O from the home mission funds, but exclusive of the sums raised in die district for day schools in connection with the church. The total sums raised for the following objects during the past six years or since the formation of the congregation were reported as follows : £ s. d 1. —For Ministerial Support— From Local Contributions . . 746 33 From Home Mission Fund . . 308 179 1,055 1 0 2.—For Church and Manse buildings . 938 2 7 3. —For Missionary and other objects . 50 9 2 Total .... £2,04312 9 Leaving still a debt on the Manse and other funds of £454.

After the Report was read, the Rev. J. Macky, being appointed by the Presbytery of Auckland to visit the congregation, addressed the meeting and congratulated those present on the healthy state and hopeful prospects of the church, at the same time urging them to greater exertions so as at once to asumc the position of a self-supporting congregation—apositi >n all the more necessary owing to the many claims that are coming in upon the Home Mission Fund, on account of the rapid extension of the church in other new districts. -Thereafter the following resolutions were unanimously agreed to : l._ Moved by Mr. Longmore, and seconded by Mr. McNicol—That the report now read be adopted, and the ihanks of the meeting awarded to the general committee for 1861.

2.—Moved hy Mr. Henderson and seconded by Mr. J. Nisbet—That the individuals appointed as members of the several local committees, be now appointed as the general committee of management for this year, viz :

Messrs. Hay, Gardiner, Reid, Craig, Gibb, Falhvell, Papakura; Nisbet, Young, J. Runciman, Blake and Rhodes, Driiry ; Matheson, McNicol, Henderson, Coutts, Crawford, and Bremner,"Wairoa ; T. Reid, Gordon, Gracie, Ritchie andFlexman, Waiuku ; Dearness A. McDonald, W. Runciman, and Comril, Pukekohe. 3.—Moved by Mr. Bremncr, and seconded by Mr. Reid—That Mr. W. Hay be again general secretary, and Mr. J. Henderson, general treasurer for this year. 4. —Moved by Mr. Henderson, and seconded by Mr. Hay—That energetic measures be at once taken throughout all the stations, to raise the congregation to a self-supporting position. It was also unanimously agreed to make an early effort towards the reduction, or total reduction of the debt on the congregation, which it is hoped will soon be successfully made. In the evening of the same day, the annual soiree of the Papakura church was held, and although the severity of the weather kept back many friends from a distance, yet there were from "0 to 80 present. The ladies, although most of them had to come a distance of several miles, mustered in full force with an abundant provision of tea and other good things; and after partaking of which, the meeting was suitably and eloquently addressed by the chairman, Rev. T. Norric, Revds. Mr. Macky and Mason, and Messrs. Hay, Henderson, Bremner, Reid, Scott and W. Hay, jun., the two latter speakers duly attending to the duty of thanking the ladies for their exertions on the occasion. Mr. Thompson, precenter of Otahuhu, with a select choir from the district, sang several anthems with good taste and precision, which contriimted much to the entertainment of the evening. The whole proceedings gave great satisfaction to all present, and the only regret was that so many had been hindered from shareing the instruction and* enjoyment. The proceeds of the soiree have not, for the reasons mentioned, reduced the debt of about £SO on the church to such an extent as was expected, and the local committee intend making an early effort in another form, in order to entirely clear off the burden still pressing on the local congregation. We have no doubt but all true wellwishers to the country districts will be glad to assist in the good work, when the appeal is made.— Correspondent.

ST. ANDREW'S PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tub anniversary soiree in connection with this place of worship, was held in the church building on Tuesday, 11th ultimo. In addition to the Rev. 1). Bruce, pastor loci, there were also present Rev. T. Nome, Fapakura, Rev. W. Mason, Auckland, and a large company of ladies and gentlemen. The arrangements were excellent. After tea, the annual report was read by Mr. Henry Gilfillan. This document gave an interesting and highly satisfactory statement of the operations of the St. A"ndrew's«Church, and made allusion to the recent erection of the Hobson-street branch of the church into a separate-charge, under the name of St. James' Church. It likewise referred to the educational operations in connexion witli the church, bearing testimony to the efficient management of the schools; and alluded to the gradual reduction of the church debt to £l4O. ' Mr. Walter Graham read the financial statement for the past year, lie also urged the congregation to increased liberality, and expressed the hope that they would be foremost in every good work. Mr. Henry Gilfillan moved the adoption of the report of the deacons and the financial statement. He alluded to the fact that the church debt had been reduced from £6OO to £l4O, and said that it was high time the entire amount was paid off. Ho suggested that a special effort should be made on the occasion, which was the first well attended anniversary meeting he had seen during the eight years be was in Auckland. It only required twenty-eight persons to subscribe £5 each, and the debt could be paid. He would head the list. (Applause.) ' Mr. William Aitken seconded the motion, and suggested that a subscription list be immediately opened. The motion was carried, and the list was passed round the pews. We have been informed that £IOO was at once subscribed; and that the remainder has since been raised. Rev. D. Bruce then addressed the meeting. He said he first desired to express his feeling of satisfaction at meeting so manv members of the church and congregation tliaFevening. . As Mr. Gilfillan had remarked, this was the first occasion when there was so large an attendance at the anniversary meeting, and he was convinced that many beneficial results-would flow from it. (Hear.) He had no doubt as to the success of the experiment then being made for raising a fund to liquidate the balance of debt on the church; while much lasting good would resut from their being brought into association with each other, and he felt certain that they would more cordially unite for the accomplishment of great objects. He knew it was expected that he would make some observations on his late trip to Otago, on the business of the church. He could only say at the outset that he wished much that this part of the proceedings had fallen to the lot of one more competent to deal with it, and whose graphic sketches were more or less familiar to them ail. (Hear, and laughter.) Seeing that the incidents of the trip were made familiar to thein by the gentleman to whom he alluded, he would not travel over that ground, but would content himself with giving some touches ecclesiastic. And first he might say that on his visit to Australia last year, he had had particularity before his mind the strongly expressed wish on the part of many at home, namely—the desirability of organising an Australasian church, embracing the members of the Presbyterian communions in New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania and the New Zealand islands, the General Assembly of which meeting biennially, or as at the Cape of Good Hope, once in five years, might be able to accomplish great results from its extensive organisation. But he was convinced, on that visit, that this was an impracticable scheme. He did not know how it could be carried out, for he observed in the other colonies tendencies and want of sympathy, which rendered it questionable whether anything practicable wquld grow out of a union with those colonies. The conviction then became stronger in his mindthan.it had been before, of the necessity for organising, as early as.possib'e, a Presbyterian Church for New Zealand. " That subject had been introduced at the Auckland Presbytery, and freely discussed before his visit to Australia; and on being again discussed the Presbytery communicated their thoughts to their brethern in Otago, inviting them to come up to Auekland; during thegiuing of the General Assembly when

] they would have had the assistance of several memhers I oftiie church from the South, who were attending to their I legislative duties. However, they found that their Otago friends could not he easilv moved, and they quietly returned word that thev did not think it was practicable for them to come to Auckland. The members of the Auckland Presbytery wrote in reply, stating that as ! they could not come'up. if they would name the place I for'holding the conference, they would go and meet I them; and like canny Scotchmen, as most of them are 1 in Otago, thev fixed upon their own home as the place. of meeting, no doubt believing Dunedin to be the most I important; and in their idea also, the most central J place in New Zealand. (Laughter.) But having given ! their brethren the choice of place, they were not going j to quarrel about the selection, and accordingly he left Auckland for the South, accompanied by two elders of the church, Mr. A. Clark and Mr. T.S. Forsaith, and the conference was held in November. On the way, they were joined at Nelson bv two brethren—the Rev. Mr. Catder, and Mr. McCrea", elder—the latter being remarkable for his large-hearted liberality in matters pertaining to religion. ■ At Wellington, the delegates lrom the North were invited to resuscitate the Presbytery, which had become defunct, and this they consented to do on the condition that the Wellington brethren would adopt a wider basis than that on which thev had originally based it. This, they had consented to do, and it was temporarily established on the basis of the Presbytery of Auckland until the result of the conference at Dunedin should be known. The result was most happy, as they admitted to the Presbytery ministers representing 'the Free Church, the United Presbyterian Church, and the good old Covenanting Church of Scotland, together with a brother who had just been admitted into the church. The Auckland and Nelson delegates took three of the Wellington brethren and one elder, representing three branches of the church, with them to Dunedin. And it was a matter of great satisfaction to him, that of those who went from the North and Nelson, they had with them two ministers, one from the United Presbyterian Church, and the other from the old Reformed Presbyterian Church. To one of these, venerable from his years and labours in the service of his Master,; he (Mr. Bruce) looked up to as to a father, and could not help paying to him that attention which a son; would pay to an aged parent. When they got to Dunedin, their first welcome from the weather was bitter and cold; and it seemed to him that their business was entered on under low circumstances indeed, especially as when, with two or three friends, not wishing to lose the whole of Sunday on board the steamer, he attempted to walk from Port Chalmers to Dunedin, and found the roads in such a wretched state that they could not reach town before night. They were kindly received on their arrival in town, and provided with comfortable lodgings by their Dunedin brethren, their host and hostess receiving them as members of their own family. ! And here he (Mr. Bruce) desired to apprise his friends that when the brethren from the South come to Auckland this year on the business of the church, he would invite them to entertain them with hospitality equal to what had been extended to the Northern deputation in Dunedin, and he was sure he would not make the appeal in vain. (Applause.) A few days after their arrival in Dunedin, they met in conference, and they had a sermon from the Rev. Dr. Burns, who might be styled the father of the Church, but which he regretted that eminent minister of the Gospel had declined to allow to be printed. He regretted this very much, because he was certain that the members of the Church throughout New Zealand would have • been greatly benefitted by reading the fine thoughts and feelings with which the sermon abounded. With respect to Dr. Burns, he was happy to say that instead of finding him narrow-minded and crotchety, as he had been represented to him by some, he was a man liberal in his views, and most anxious to carry out the great work which they had undertaken. Dr. Burns at once informed him (Mr. Bruce) of the local difficulties and prejudices that had to be contended against, and the best way of overcoming them; and from that moment he felt certain of the success of the movement The conference met, and after a few days' deliberation, the basis was adopted, which most of them had read, and which coincided with the views and sentiments ot the different branches of the Presbyterian Church without compromising any. (Hear.) The chief difficulty was a geog'-aphic one. The brethren in Otago did not know how it was possible to meet yearly in assembly, either in Auckland or Dunedin, without inflicting injury on their congregations. This was met by cmpowering the three Synods into which the colony was divided, to deal summarily with certain cases as they might arise, leaving it to the General Assembly to determine at its first sitting the period and place for its next meeting. This was the only difficulty, and it did seem to him that the Lord had poured out the spirit of union upon them, for a feeling appeared to pervade that they should do what was best to promote the good of the land and the glory of God. One subject which caused a little discussion, was characteristic of the good man who raised the objection. It was known that a feeling prevailed", especially among the younger members of the church in favour of the use of hymns in public worship, and it was felt by the members of the conference that if hymns were used, it should be under the sanction and by. the authority of the church courts; but Mr. McCrea, believing that the hymns were intended altogether to supersede the psalms, remarked that this was " the worst thing that Bruce had yet done"—laughter—with the view of throwing any blame there might be in the whole proceedings on his (Mr. Bruce's) shoulders. However, Mr. McCrea, on being satisfied that it was only intended to use the hymns as supplemental to the psalms, he did not oppose it. He only wished that their elders everywhere were such men as the gentlemen to whom he had.referred, and that they were alias large-hearted and possessed of as fine sympathies. (Hear.) He had nothing more particular 1 to: say of [the conference ; but it appeared to him then and now, that there was one thing over and above the contemplated organisation, that might be completed in Auckland in November next, which was required of them.as a church. He thought they should procure two men of considerable experience, physical endurance, and a great, deal of forbearance and good i sense, whose duty should be to pass lip and down through the country to organise the church, in those outlying districts which could not yet be reached by a stated ministry. (Hear.) This subject had been a matter ot deep concern to most ministers of the church. They felt that they could not go themselves without inquiry to their own congregations, while they were convinced that much good would be done to the church and the cause of Christ, by attending to those families who were located at considerable distances from the centres of population. He (Mr. Bruce) spoke feelingly on the subject, He knew that he had left his own congregation too often of late, but they were aware also that his absence was for the interest of the church. (Hear.) He knew that in this province there was much work of the kind he had indicated, and to discharge it thoroughly it would take the entire time of a minister during the summer. Much as he desired to engage in this work, he could not possibly devote the time to it; but the church never would take proper hold :on the country unless steps were taken to discharge the duty she owed to the members of her communion, who could not attend the ordinary places Of public worship. (Hear.) The last work which be had done was the most agreeable of;all. He alluded to the settlement in Wangarei of the Rev. Mr. Gorrie. (Hear ) That was a most happy settlement ; and he believed that God would bless his brother in his labours in that district, for his earnest piety, practical good sense, and long experience in the colony made him eminently qualified to be useful to the people among whom he was located. (Hear.) lie would like to say a word about the gold fields, which he had visited, but he must take 'another opportunity. It was enough to say now that they were not the very wicked places they were usually represented to be. He there found., people of earnest piety—servants of God, who were not ashamed, in the midst of hardships and trying circumstances to own their Lord, and to make sacrifices on account of their faith. (Hear.) He would say in conclusion that much as they needed unity and organization, in order to accomplish anything like good results, either as a church or congregation, they should earnestly strive for the outpouring of the Spirit of God to vitalise the body, and produce that unity of spirit so much to be desired. Without this all their efforts would be vain, however perfect their organization ; for though they had a Paul and an Appollos in the church, they "could only plant and water, but the increase would be of God. They must look up for the blessing of God to descend upon the church all over the land, and to descend also upon their own congregation as a part of that church, if they hoped to see a happy end to all their undertakings. (Applause). Mr. A. Claiuv then delivered an able address on the subject of "missions." Mr. Clow next addressed the voung. Mr. T. Macfarlane spoke on " prayer," and gave some practical hints to the meeting regarding their duty as members of a christian church. After a few remarks from Mr. Wm. Rattray, in which he referred to the labours of the young men of the congregation in the Sunday school and prayer meetings, Mr. Smart proposed a vote of thanks to the ladies. He alluded to the first congregational meeting in the St. Andrew's Church which he had attended, and contrasted its cold and comfortless aspect with the present genial and successful meeting, to the success of which the ladies had so largely contributed. Mr. Smart said he would unite with the vote to the ladies who had presided at the tea tables, a vote of thanks to Mr. Reid and his friends, for their musical entertainment. He } was sure they would all agree that the music, as well [ as the ladies,'had added very much to the enjoyment i of tho evening. He'-wss also glad to.

notice the introduction of a musical instrument, and he hoped the day was not far distant when they would have an organ in tho church ; and with that aid to their church psalmody and the leading of Mr. Reid. ho was sure they would stand second to no Presbyterian church in the colony. (Applause.) Mr. J. Clark replied, in a neat speech, on behalf of the ladies, and the proceedings terminated. In concluding this report we must bear our unqualified testimony to the excellence of the music. Tho vocalists were taken from the congregation; and the power and expression with which the anthems were rendered would have done credit to a more pretentions choir. Mr. Hugh Eeid was in excellent voice, and his solas were very effective, PRESENTATION OF TESTIMONIAL TO MR. H. TAYLOR. A stoker of the Certificated Teachers of this Province met at Claremont House, on Saturday evening, the 15th ult., for the purpose ol presenting a testimonial to Mr. H. Taylor, upon his resignation of the office of Inspector oi Schools. The testimonial, which consisted of a handsome timepiece under a glass shade, bore the following suitable inscription: ''Presented to Henry Taylor, Esq., by the Certificated Teachers of tho Province of Auckland, as a testimonial of respect and esteem for his uniform kindness and impartial discharge of his duties as Inspector of Schools " The following are tho names of tho Certificated Teachers present:—Mrs. Testa, Mrs. Otway, Mifß Rich, Miss Clark, Miss L. Flower, Miss Johnson; Mr. Diddams, Mr. Brabazon, Mr. Singer, Mr. French, Mr. Brown, Mr. Swinbourn, Mr. Mays, Mr. Glanfield. Tea being concluded, Mr, Joseph Brown favoured the company with music, after which Mr. Diddajis commenced the real business of the evening. Their present position, he said, was of so ■ novel a character that he felt called upon to explain how it was they were found in such circumstance;?. It was npvel, for a teacher's friend, and moreover an official one, was so rarely met with, especially on this side of the globe, that when one did make his appearance they were disposed to make much of him, for his scarcity increased his value. That Mr. Taylor had proved himself a teacher's friend none present would deny.

His interest iu them and their work had ever been a leading feature of his character, and to all who had had the good fortune of Ins acquaintance he had proved himself a willing counsellor, a sound adviser, and a staunch friend. Considering the arduous duties of an Inspector, the evenness of temper, good sound common sense, skill; and talent requisite to discharge those duties satisfactorily, unanimity on this subject agreed that Mr. Taylor possessed these qualifications, and had not failed to exercise them. Whenever he came into the school it was always as a friend; no censoriousness was exhibited; but if fault there was, it was pointed out in a spirit of fairness and kindness. These qualifications, coupled with his gentlemanly and impartial discharge of his duties, had so endeared him to the teachers that could only view his separation as a great loss and misfortune. "It is now," continued the speaker, " my pleasing duty, in the name of the teachers of the Province of Auckland, to beg your acceptance of our Testimonial to your many valuable virtues. From our hearts we wish you health and every happiness, and may equal success attend you in your new sphere of duty." Mr. Taylor replied as _ follows: My very kind friends, you indeed take me quite by surprise by your unexpected manifestation of your good feeling towards • me, and your satisfaction with my services as Inspector of Schools. lam happy, and also truly proud, to have merited the good opinion of you all, and I regret that the occasion has arrived which may make some interruption to the good feeling and social intercourse that has hitherto existed between us; but I trust nothing will ever impair the mutual esteem aud good will, that has been growiug up for some years. It was with much hesitation and considerable pain that I made up my mind to resign the appointment of Inspector; butwlien I saw that the cause of education had awakened the public mind to a sense of its value and importance,; when I saw that many hindrances likely to check its progress had been removed, and further that a wide field of usefulness was opened up to me in the amelioration of the native race, I.determined to sacrifice my private feelings to a sense of humanity; and I trust that,, with God's blessing, I shall be found instrumental in working out the elevation and amelioration of the native race,—a race worthy of our attention, for their physical, intellectual, and moral development. As I have already said, I am proud to have merited your good opinion, and I trust you will excuse my giving expression to this natural feeling of the human heart;. for you are all chosen men, picked men of the colony; you represent a small, but most important section of the community of Auckland; you have been."chosen by the parents of the children of Auckland to assist in their education; you arc chosen, not only for your intellectual acquirements, but jour purity and morality of character. You have been subjected to the most severe tests and criticism which it is possible for any man to bo subjected, and I am proud to add my testimony that, like gold tried in the fire, you have come out refined, and I now bear most willing testimony to your sterling worth. Your character is subjected to daily inspection and searching criticism. The eyes of children are fastened continually on you, and their power of discrimination is more extensive than we think. Indeed, I would be moro disposed to take the testimony of a child as to the moral worth of a man, with whom he is in daily communication than of a ■ person of more advanced years. In alluding to the nature of your examinations, I may state candidly, the amount of pressure that has been put upon me out of doors to make some change in the nature of these examinations, some deviation from rigour; but I could not do so. Not only should I have been violating my contract with the Board, to whom I had pledged myself to do my best to raise the standard of education in in the colony; but I should also have done an injury to the cause of education, and a positive injustice to yourselves; for your value as teachers becomes enhanced in proportion to the severity of the examination you have undergone: and here I may solemnly declare, that I never allowed feelings arising from any other cause whatsoever to warp my judgment or influence my justice in giving a decision. Whenever I have had to offer any barrier to any persons obtaining a certificate, it has caused me much pain; but I have done it from a sense of duty to education generally, and yourselves particularly. I will now make one or two suggestions, based on four or five years' experience; and first I would beg to advise that your language cannot be too simple and plain when in the school-room. It is a hard task, no doubt, to unlearn what we have been learning through life, the nicely rounded. phrase and elegant mode of expression; but if you would be successful as tcachers,you cannot use language too simple. It is the tendency of the present age to store the child's mind with a large amount of knowledge of various descriptions, almost to the exclusion of any food for the fancy and imagination. This I think to be wrong. The.heart of the child can be easily captivated through the fancy, and when the feelings are enlisted, it is easy to make an inroad into the mind.

I am alrpost inclined to say tfcat I would sooner see a child lost in the perusal of " Sinbad the Sailor" or the, " Seven Champions of Christendom" than in studying " The Great Oceanic Currents" or " Astral Phenomena." I must also make some comment on a fact that militates. against your success as teachers, though the fault lies not with you but with the parents themselves. You are aware at what an early age they remove children from school—just when the child begins to burn with, the enthusiasm of learning and an earnest thirst for knowledge, he is hurried from school, and the glow of enthusiasm lost in menial drudgery. Often have I pondered over some remedy that would be likely to do away with the evil, and the only one that appears to me at all feasible, would be that the teachers of Auckland as a body, should petition the Provincial Council to set apart annually £IOO or £2OO as prizes, to be competed for by candidates from 13 to 15 years of age, who have been at a government school for three or four years. This I think would be the means of children remaining longer at school; the prizes might be about £25 or £3O, which would enable them to apprentice themselves out. 1 here are, I have no doubt, many gentlemen in Auckland both willing and able to conduct such an examination, which would give the public an opportunity of ascertaining the amount and character of the instruction imparted in the public schools. At present there is no means of ascertaining this, except by the published statement of the Board, which is not sufficient. If the present system continues, of taking away children at 12 or 13, I would advise you to confine yourselves.closely to the more essential branches of education, reading, writing, and arithmetic. Their - time is very short at school and the few years they remain there could not be more appropriately employed. I need scarcely make any remark on moral training, of the value of which I am sure you are all aware ; you have all consciences and will not be apathetic, or devoid of the moral courage which will enable you to discharge your duties in this respect. Mr. Diddams, you have been pleased to comment on the courtesy and kindness shown by me to the teachers ; I am much indebted to you for such expressions, but I take no credit to myself in this respect. It was only my dirty. It Iks always been my study to give equal satisfaction to the Board of Education and the teachers generally, and the proceedings that have taken place this night have Iled me to consider that my endeavours in this respect have not been unattended with success." I must now, my kind friends, renew, my thanks for your kind expression of fssling towards me, and ako for the ralu-

able and handsome present which accompanies the expression of those feelings, and these words are not the mere empty phraseology of common civility and politeness, but the sincere outpourings of a grateful heart, deeply felt but inadequately expressed. I trust your labours in the work of education may be attended with success and may you long merit the esteem and good will of the public of Auckland. May God's blessing accompany you in those labours and may you through assistance trom above be the means of drawing many souls to salvation by imparting to them the first glimpses of Divine truth and love. Th's handsome memorial of your affection I shall deeply prize, and" it shall long continue to be prized by my family, and I hope my children Beeing this and the inscription which it bears may be actuated to perform their duty in life with a regard to affability, courtesy, and justice to all. Accept my thanks for the very kind expression of your feelings and I assure you the teachers of this Province shall long continue to be remembered by me with feelings of much esteem, respect and love. Mr. DiDDAMa said he did not deserve the thanks Mr. Taylor had proffered to him, for the remarks he made were simply the expressions of the different teachers at large eollated together. Mr. Taylor had said he had only done his duty, but he might have discharged hie duty strictly, yet without calling forth their feelings of gratitude, if he had done it in a different spirit. What they so much admired and appreciated was the way in which he (Mr. Taylor, had ever discharged bis duties. Mr. Taylor would make one more remark. If ever any occasion should arrive when his advice would be of the slightest benefit to any of the teachers, he should be at all times most willing to give it. Mr. Brabazon had great pleasure in seconding the remarks of Mr. Diddams, with every word of which all present must agree. Mr. Taylor had been very kind to teachers in giving them advice, and gentlemanly in the way he had spoken to them with regard to school duties. Some of them were no doubt aware of the ostentatious and masterful style assumed by School Inspectors at home, but Mr. Taylor had always paid his visits in an unostentatious and friendly way, for which every teacher must respect him. He (Mr. B.) had received several letters from teachers in different parts of the Province, expressive of the high esteem in which they held Mr. Taylor as Inspector of Schools. Every one would fully bear him out in saying that they had suffered a great loss in the removal of Mr. Taylor, and he hoped everything would be done in future in the same kindly manner as by Mr. Taylor. Mr. May said it had struck him all along that a large measure of the success which had attended the working of the Education Act had been attributable to Mr. Taylor, and the public of Auckland, when they read Mr. Taylor's speech would regret the loss of so valuable.u man. His views on the subject of schools weuld open their eyes to his value.—Mr. Mays then spoke very highly of the Education A«. its liberal and ansectariau character and the great advantages derived from it, and thought the teachers of Auckland should band themselves together to preserve it in its present shape, for any attempt to palter with it would inflict an injury on every part of the Province. Three fourths of the schools could not exist without it. He Btrongly impressed upon the meeting the desirability of forming n Teachers' Association for the Province, and thought they might form the nucleus of it this evening.

Mr, Bkabazon remarked that he had frequently conversed with the respectable portion of the Roman Catholic body in this Province, and they had invariably said that the system of examination adopted by Mr. Taylor and the Board was fair and impartial. As far as his own observation went, he thought tho examination wA a fair one, and if it were lessened in any way it would be dealing improperly with the teachers of Auckland of both parties, those who succeeded and those who failed. Mr. Diddams spoke strongly in favour of forming a Teachers' Association, and desired to hear the opinions of those present upon it. Mr. Sixgkr said he wished, before taking leave of Mr. Taylor, to endorse fully the remarks made by Mr. Diddams and Mr. Brabazon. The examinations, instead of being rigorous, were below what he had eesn given to teachers at home, and he thought Mr. Taylor had dono quite right in maintaining the standard he had erected, in order not to lower the character of teachets. He had had to do with many school inspectors at home, but never met with one that blended so much of information and scholarship with humility and affability. He had alwayß received from Mr. Taylor the utmost respect and friendly information, and they had all received some valuable suggestions from him to-night. He did not know how they wero to get any one else to supply Mr. Taylor's place, and his leaving the cause of education in Auckland would bo deeply felt by the public. But he was going into a wider sphere of usefulness, where his bright learning and goodness of heart would achieve more than many of those who had not the high principle of doing their duty and serving God, which he had ever seen in Mr. Taylor. He (Mr. S.) held in hand a paper of signatures of teachers desirous to form such an Association as had been spoken of, for which purpose they would meet on Saturday, March Ist, at 2 p.m., in St. Paul's Schol-room. Great good would arise from such an Association, if they met with the single object of striving to fulfil God's will as teachers, and implore his blessing upon it; they would strengthen each others hands not only in a political sense, in guarding the Education Act, but in those trials of teachers which the world did not see, —trials so heavy sometimes that it required great patience and perseverance to resolve to continue in their work; but so long as there was a door open, it was their duty to go on. He would strive to impress on them their high moral position as teachers, to consider themselves as forming the men and women of the next generation. They should make this a matter of serious consideration, and implore God's blessing on everything they did. He now took leave of Mr. Taylor with the highest expression of his esteem and regard, and trusted that with God's blessing he would see, yet more than he had here, the work of the Lord prosper in the land. Mr. Taylor shortly alter took his leave, as " a proud, a happy, and yet a sad man."

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LOCAL EPITOME., New Zealander, Volume XVIII, Issue 1658, 8 March 1862

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LOCAL EPITOME. New Zealander, Volume XVIII, Issue 1658, 8 March 1862

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