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Maritime Record.

Our smart little Auckland clipper Zillah, Captain Williama, rniredfrotn Hobait Town, on Wednesday morning, after little nortthan a fourteen days passage. She took her departure on ttetSnd ultimo, but was becalmed for two days in Storm Bay; timed the land on the 24th ; and encountered a great deal of bad weather all the way across. Made the Three Kings on Saturday the 3rd instant, and from thence had to contend agaimt light contrary winds and calms all the way along the tout.

The barque Catherine Pemberton, Captain Harris, signalled late on Wednesday afternoon, dropped anchor off Hobson’a Bay on Thursday about 4 p.m, She sailed from Lyttelton on the 26th ultimo, at 7 a.m., in company with the Oriental, Captain Macay, bound for Shanghai, with a strong Northerly hreese b'owing. About 8 p.m., dirty weather, with a strong I pie from South-east which lasted till noon of the 27th, when it moderated and blew from the South. At this time sighted the Oriental under low sail, that is to say under double reefed topuiU, whilst the Catherine Pemberton was carrying all plain nil; wpposed he had sprung his topmast. T hat night, it set i»» strong gale from the South-east, which continued until noon of the following day, the 28th ; after that the weather betttneflne, with the wind at North to North-east, until Friday the 2nd instant, when it blew furiously from the Northward, *ilh thick, dirty weather a heavy sea running. This lasted till 1 (ut. of Saturday the >d, when it suddenly abated. Rounded the East Cape on Sunday « 9 a.m. ; and, at 3 p.m,. White hUnd then distant thirty mt| e s, sighted the steamer White *»w. Had light winds from the West to West South West from that time, At 8 p.m. or [he 6th, descried Cuvier Wind bearing West by South six mm* distant. The Catherine Ftmberton it a good looking barque, tr,d has come into port in creditable order, She was, we hear, a Lvourite ship in the Adelaide trade, in which she made several vo^gej. The Aberdeen barque Yallisneria, of which seir, U j apprehends were beginning to be entertained, had arrivei at Lyttelton previous tothe sailing of the Catherine Pemberton From tke Lyttelton Times, of the 19th November, we der.. e t h e following particulars of her long and disastrous passage. The particulars of the mishaps of the Yallisneria, as supplies Captain Webb, will no doubt be of interest to the sealing community. They were received too late for our last kwe. The Yallisneria is a small barque, of 243 tons, new Btuurment, belonging to the port of Loudon, but built in Aberdeen about ten years ago, on the clipper model. She ••iIM from Grave-end on the 9th May last, and without any A*hy in the channel, carried favourable winds to the Equator, *hieh the crossed on the 29th day out, in 22.J degrees of west beatitude, The south-east trades were early fallen in with, and hetag of a remarkable heavy character, were crossed solely under double-reefed topsails. The Island of Trinidad vras sighted. After leaving the trades a succession of gales were experienced, particularly oft the Cape and Madagascar. On the 16th J *iy. in latitude 38 3 30* S, and longitude 49® 28' E.. enWintered a fearful hurricane or cyclone, varying from N. to *>•£. and E.N E. The ship was hove to on her beam-ends for * hours, making much water, crew and passengers at the Fowpi, and expecting hourly to founder. The bulwarks and fort stanchions were carried away, and much damage was Ao»e to uiland rigging. The fourth day after passing through Ibis cyclone, encountered another most furious hurricane : the *hip was thrown completely on her beam-ends, the pumps M»tr ceasing. She was got befoie the wind, and kept so at 'imei, scudding for 24 hours dead to the northward, under b*** poles. On the 22nd July, the sea got too heavy, maUng a «!«ui breach over the stern, filling the decks fore and aft the •hip it the same time making much water from below. On fo night of the 24th Captain Webb was obliged to round p, *hegale being from S.S.E., and the ship lay in a perilous stall her beam ends for three whole days, on the last o w ic.,| •h* began to settle over on her broadside, presenting an apprecalculated to excite the greatest apprehension. On the forth day the wind lulled a little, and at night it was P®”'® e 10 l«t below and tighten the ship, which was done by shifting cargo below, and filling vp some empty waiev casks, next day Captain Webb found himself driven to the norlhfod into 31 = 2(t’S. Lat. upon which both passengers and a *» begged him to go into Mauritius or some other place of Mfc, y. As it was very evident that no possibility existed of the passage in the then wrecked condition. Captain 7*bb consented to the above request and shaped his course Port Louis. The next S.E. gale the ship did not make w>e so much water, amt in fine weather and smooth water "“Aevety little. Calms and headwinds impeded the passage 10 p on Louis until the loth August, when repairs were at "““proceeded vmh according to survey reports under average, bpwards of 3on tons of cargo were discharged to lighten the ,hjl P and about 22 packages turning out very much damaged •«e soy. Captain Webb found u Port Louis a great number *,*«•*!*. both outward and homeward bound, ’which had tellenin with the severe weather prevalent during June and July '* that quarter, and had put into the same place for repairs. the docks and slips were full, ships waiting their turn to be tak(n in hand. After completing repairs and necessary busm*he Yallisneria sailed again on the 25th September, aving days in Mauritius, and reached this port all wet . “•favourable passage of 50 days. °«r old friend Captain Foster was in Lyttelton with the £ «l»ndia, and from the tesliinotii.il* presented to him, wiu‘““L now as ever, the golden opinions of hia passenger*. Cv clonb t.v thb Arabian Ska.— Ship «• Typhoon. * following is an extract from a journal kept by ,are ’’"liam O'Kelly, tlurd male of the ship Typhoon, on her pasFtom Aden to Bombay, latitude 15 30 degrees N-, lon•fode 66 degrees £.:—•• On the morning of the 3rd of June, *®»«rious indications best Known to experienced men, the I that u wn gt*!ng to How ’lttes #«n* ( « h*

graphically expressed it, and accordingly orders were Issued to make everything well secure. Previous to this royal yards, studdingsailbooms, and flyingjiboom were all sent down, and the ship was hove to under a close-reefed maintopsail. Incompliance with the above order, all the other sails were well lashed round their respective yards with preventive gaskets ; spars, boats and all things likely to move, well secured, hatches battened etc. About seven a.m., the wind increased to a terrific gale, and in the same proportion did the squalls and rain increase in frequency and fierceness. A little after eight a.m. the wind, which previous to this seemed to be travelling allround the compass, suddenly shifted to theS.W., and a cyclone in all its fury struck the ship, which lay over with her lee bulwarks in the water. The maintopsail held on about ten or fifteen minutes, when the truss bolt of the ysrdsnapt like a carrot, though of wrought iron and about four inches in diameter. The sail flew into ribbons, and great pieces of canvas went flying to leeward. The weather topsailsheet drew the eyebolt out of the deck, carrying with it one-half of the belaying rail, and unshipping the crank-wheels that work the main pumpsOn the carpenter sounding there was no water, or so little that it was of no consequence. Half-past nine a m.—All things were now in a critical state, some of the beams in the cabin we re broken, the ship working and groaning in a frightful state. About one a.m. the cyclone struck the ship again, laying her over till two or three feet of her main deck were in the water, Maintopsail yard adrift, sail in ribbons, foretopsail and crossjack blown out of the gaskets, the mainmast bending like a whip saw, with some of the weather rigging carried away, rendering it utterly immpossible for the men just then to go aloft- The carpenters made a temporary fixture for the pump, and were standing by, axe in hand, to cut away the masts, and some of the crew had lashed themselves to the weather bulwarks. Twelve o’clock ; Captain Faulkner encouraged the crew by telling them that he thought we had got the worst, and giving them a glass of grog. They then got some dinner. After dinner the men went aloft, cutting away the torn canvas, and endeavouring to secure the topsail yard. Found that the trap band had sawed into the topmast, rendering it completely useless for future services, and that the topmast rigging was all chafed and cut. However, the yard was secured as well as it was possible to do under the circumstances, and a tackle got on the mainmast, etc. By this time the wind had visibly decreased, though it was still blowing hard, with a trememluous sea. Lay to all night, and in the morning squared away, and ran under reefed foresail, all our other sails having been blown to ribbons. The carpenter reported foreyard gone, copper started, and no doubt other damages will appear when the weather will permit a thorough examination. Previously to this cyclone coming on there seemed something inexplicably strange in the appearance of nature. Heavy dark masses of clouds stumbled and rolled about in dire confusion, a calm fell suddenly, and the air became thick and heavy, causing a difficulty in respiration. The sea, imitating the clouds, rose in crested masses. The ship became inundated with numbers of beautiful butterflies, andzmany species of sea birds crowded the deck, and lay with drooping wing, completely exhausted, some even entering the cabin.”— Nelboutne Herald Oct. 26.

THE WHITE STAR NEW ZEALAND CLIPPER,

SHALIMAR.”

[From the “ lllustriated News of the World,” July 23,]

This renowned and noble clipper, an engraving of which is given on this page, is one of those famous ships which have obtained for Liverpool the credit of being par excellence the leaping emigration port of the United Kingdom. She was bought when quite new by Messrs. H. T. Wilson and Chambers, especially for their Australian trade, and possesses to the fullest extent all the requisites of a model passenger ship. Her register tonnage is very large, being 1,45(5 tons, with a bnrthen of 4,350 tons. The Shalimar is one of the fastest clippers afloat, and was selected to carry her Majesty’s royal mails to Australia and back on three several voyages. On her first voyage from Liverpool to Melbourne she made the passage from land to land in 67 days, from port to port in 74 days 10 hours: the return voyage was made in 75 days. On this occasion she sailed the extraordinary distance of 420 nautical miles in one day; while the whole voyage out and home (including the whole detention abroad) occupied the short space of 6 months and 14 days. Her next voyage out was made in 76 days, and home in 79 days. On her last voyage home she beat every passage of the season, and ran the great distance of 7.680 mile in 32 days, being an average rate of 240 miles per day for the whole run. The Shalimar is the White Star New Zealand clipper of the 10th September, sailing from Liverpool to Auckland, and thence to Wellington, Her saloons are very handsome, and contains bath-room, library, piano, &c. ~For the information of our readers, we may slate that the next clipper, the Shooting Star, connected with the enterprsing owners of the White Star Line of Australian packets, will sail at noon the 10th of August for Auckland and Wellington, and we understand that her room is being rapidly filled up. This famous ship has made some of the fastest passages on record, including two runs of 73 and 75 days to Melbourne, and on her last voyage home she beat one the fastest ocean steamers. Her commander, E. J. Allen, is said to be one of the most popular men in the Australian trade, and has received numerous testimonials from all his passengers. (From the" Old Folks at Home, 1 ’ Sept. 10.) We give a list cf passengers by “ Shalimar” for New Zealand up to going to press.—Her well-known sailing qualities and general character should secure a lull complement. We cannot but wish every success to the effort to direct the New Zealand traffic to this port, a* its central situation, independent of the character of the vessels, ought to command it, SALOON AND KOBE CABIN: Mr. Smelling, Mr. Masefield, Mr. Andrew Bonar, MisBonar, Messrs. William and John Bonar. Miss Paton, MrAllott, Mr. Robert, and Mrs. Huston. Mr. Kilching, Mr. Singlehurst, and Mr, Brandon, Mr. and Mrs. Kidd, and family, Mr. James Faughey, Messrs George and William Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Lamb, Mr Wylie, Miss Swift, Mr. Charles H. Jones, Mr. Sam. Johnson; making with the 2nd Cabin, Intermediate, aid Steerage, a grand total of 238 passengers.

There are at present sixty-five vessels loading in London for Australia and New Zealand, average tonnage 700 tons each, and of the thirteen loading in Liverpool the average is 1000 tons each 1 Tis in addition to punctuality, accounts for the preference given to Liverpool vessels as passenger ships, particularly when it is borne in mind that most of these latter are clipper-built. In our posts-cript for the Marseilles mail we will furnish list of passengers per “ Shalimar,” the New Zealand packet of the 10th, and hope by that time to be able to make some remarks on the last Australian news which has been delayed by the accident to the 11 Noitham.” The clipper ship “ Prince of the Seas,” Captain H. A. Brown, belonging to the “ White Star” line of Liverpool and Australian packets, arrived in the Mersey from Melbourne on the 31st ult., after si passage of 04 days, left that port on the 20ih of May. She had on board 10,321 ounces of gold, of the value of £105,2114.

The “Avon/’ Captain Richardson, which sailed from Melbourne on 2lst May. arrived at Gravesend on the 31st ult. She brings 45,888 ounces of gold, valued at £11)3,544, and 25,000 sovereigns on freight. The " Greyhound," Captain Davis, of the “White Star'* line, sailed on the 24th ult. for Melbourne with 18 cabin and 211 steerage passengers and a large and valuable cargo of general merchandise on freight. She will be succeeded on the 2oth September by the ship “ Hamilton,” Captain 1 homas, for Melbourne, with a cargo and passengers.

The " Constantine,” Captain Macoduck, belonging to the “ Mersy” line, sailed from Liverpool for Melbourne with 100 passengers and full cargo of merchandise' The “ Annie Wilson.” Captain Duckett, of the “ White Star” line, is at present in the Birkenhead dock, taking in Government emigrants from the depot. She will carry about 400, and will sail for Sydney about the Bth September The “ Alfred” will also sail for Sydney about the latter end of the month, with Government emigrants, under the White Star" flag. The second party of emigrants depached by the Tasmanian eutgration agency, consisting of 148 souls chiefly single women accu, ome d to domestic service, left Gravesend yesterday week, in the s,jp Hooghly,’’ for Hobart Town. The “Tegina,” one of Messrs. Willis it Co’s New Zealand passenger p-kets, sailed on Thursday, with a full cargo of goods and so^ e 280 chief cabin intermediates, and steerage passengers for C,| ter bury. The “ NimrouQ." one of Messrs. Willis, Gann, <k Co.’s regular monthly pac. etg f or Auckland, sails for her destination to day with one of thet ar g es t and most valuable cargoes ever shipped to New Zealam, an d with 183 “ Free Grant" passengers, via., 28 in the 5a100n,35 second cabin, and 120 steerage ,

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZ18591210.2.5

Bibliographic details

New Zealander, New Zealander, Volume XV, Issue 1424, 10 December 1859

Word Count
2,689

Maritime Record. New Zealander, Volume XV, Issue 1424, 10 December 1859

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