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The New-Zealander.

AUCKLAND, SATURDAY, SEPT. 22, 1855.

Be just and fear nut; Let all the end* thou aim’st at, be thy Country’s, Thy Con’s, ami Truth’s.

In this day’s paper we publish several addresses to the Electors. It is clear that the forthcoming Elections are already exciting considerable interest as compared with those of 1853. People ore now more alive to the importance of securin'* eligible representatives in the General As* sembly. There is no doubt that the next Session will be a most important one-probably the most important which will ever be held; and it behoves the Electors to sift ihoronghly the pretensions of the candidates* ; who come into the field. No one will, we presume, deny that during the first Sessions the Province of Auckland bis not been efficiently represented, ami now that an opportunity will so shortly present itself we trust that every effort will be ma ie to remedy the mistakes of the first Elections, if the interests of the. Province arc not kept in view, those whose

duty it is to look after them will be hitd.L blameabfe. ® ul y We are glad to see that the Bay especially will have an opportunity of rS i trieving its character. Hitherto it lias been the only electoral district that has allow J itself to be represented by one who i$ : n 1 reality a stranger. We assume as a maitZ of course that this slate of tiling no longer be allowed to continue. Thp Electors of the Bay will not again pro claim to the Colony that they have nota man amongst themselves fit to be their renreseniative. * It is also satisfactory to find that u, e Southern Division will have an opportunity of making a belter selection. Lieui.-Col I Gray retires, we believe, on account of iji ; health, and we presume that Mr. Charles | Taylor, the Waste Lands Commissioner j will hardly venture on a contest. .* For the Pensioner Settlements Major ! Greenwood has again addressed theElectok j and a new candidate has made his appeal j ancc in the person of Mr. James Farmer' j who gives a very quaint reason for Uteconfi! I dence he feels. A requisition it appears was presented to him some time ago i 0 allow himself to be put in nomination for thej Provincial Council ; this he appears to assume to be a general recommendation for any opening that may offer, and be accordingly lakes advantage of it to put himself forward for the House of Representatives. It does not yet appear whether Dr Bacot intends again to offer himself. As to the City and Suburbs all at present remains quiet. We presume that the same reason which prevented MiBrown from contesting the Superinlendency will also bean obstacle to his offering himself for a seat in the General Assembly. Mr, Porter, it is said, will not again be a can! didale for the Suburbs. The old members we are informed will again stand for the Northern Division, and we know of no others at present who are disposed to dispute their claims. The large addition that has been made to the several constituencies now’ render a contest far more formidable than at the Election of 1853. In some instances the constituencies have been nearly doubled—in all, a great increase has taken place. There is one great advantage that a numerous constituency possesses ovcrasmall one, undue influence of any kind cannot be so effectual for mischief. We do not entertain a doubt that the Electors of every district iu the Colony, front the Bay of Islands to the southernmost districts of Otago,will feel the importance of the present crisis. New Zealand has bad granted loiter a constitution conferring selfgovernment without any restrictions except such as arc required from her, tsbeinga portion of the British Empire. The experiment is a bold one for so young a colony, and much interest is no doubt fell as to the way in which the New Zealand Colonists will use the power which has been entrusted to them. It is not supposed that everything will come right at once; but patience, forbearance, and good feeling will, we fee! assured, bring about good Government. A strong impression has been rapidly gaining ground of late years That emigrants from otlr mother country lake with them from their homes the right of self-government; from us this has not been withheld, and we hope the result of the present elections will not have a tendency to shake the confidence of those who have dealt so liberally with the colony. It will not be long before our new-made senators will have an opportunity of showing what they are made of. The Governor, ia his speech at the end of the session, annouiccd his intention of calling the Assembly together again as soon as circumstances will permit. It is now r the special duly of the Electors to see that they provide fit men for the occasion.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZ18550922.2.7

Bibliographic details

The New-Zealander. AUCKLAND, SATURDAY, SEPT. 22, 1855., New Zealander, Volume 11, Issue 985, 22 September 1855

Word Count
826

The New-Zealander. AUCKLAND, SATURDAY, SEPT. 22, 1855. New Zealander, Volume 11, Issue 985, 22 September 1855

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