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The New-Zealander.

AUCKLAND, SATURDAY, DEC. 3, 1853.

Be just and fear not: Let all the ends thou aim’st at, he thy Country’s, Thy God’s, and Truth’s.

The Hamilla Mitchell arrived in our harbour on Wednesday, with between fifty and sixty passengers from England, whom we have pleasure in cordially welcoming to New Zealand. She has brought only a small mail, and we have not received any of our regular English files, which (having been, as we presume, put on board the Vimeira) we perhaps may hope to obtain by the next vessel from Sydney. Of the few papers which have come into our hands—and for most of which wc are indebted to private courtesy —the latest is the Times of the doth August,—being three days later than the intelligence received via Sydney by 11. M. S. Fanlome. In the critical position of the ItussoTurkish question, however, even one day’s news might be very important; and we have in these papers an addition to ourinformation on this subject, which—supposing it to be reliable—is of considerable moment, and happily of a pacific character. It will be remembered that at our previous dales it was understood that certain propositions for the adjustment of the dispute, which had been agreed to at Vienna by the representatives of Great Britain, France, Austria, and Prussia, had been forwarded to St. Petersburg!! and Constantinople, and that the Emperor of Russia had expressed his disposition to hccopt them; but the assent of the Sultan was still wanting. The following Telegraphic Despatch, reporting that that concurrence had been given appears in the Chronicle of August 13; — [BY SUBMARINE TELEGRAPH ] [from OCR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]

Paris, Friday

A telegraphic despatch from Trieste, which arrived this morning, brings the following news:—

“ The Porle accepts, in all its (ext, and without any modifications, the note the drawing up of which was agreed to by the four Ambassadors at Vienna.

“ This acceptance is made with courtesy. ‘‘ The Extraordinary Ambassador appointed to carry to the Czar the adhesion of the Sultan will leave for St. Petersburg!! as soon as the Russian troops receive orders to evacuate the invaded territory. “ The Sultan’s desires arc quite in conformity with the declarations of the French and English Governments.”

So far as this communication goes, it is gratifying; but we must not too sanguincly infer (roni it that peace was restored on any secure fooling. The very journal that prominently publishes it, refers to it, in a leading article, in terms that suggest the probability of its being either inaccurate, or, if correct, yet not conclusive. says the Chronicle , “these accounts are lo be relied upon, it may be hoped that the matter is far advanced towards adjustment:” and in another column we find the Berlin Correspondent of that journal (writing on the I tih August) making this cautionary remark; “A great mistake lias arisen in terming

the proposition an ultimatum. They are but the basis for the renewal of direct negotiations between the Czar and the Sultan.’ The Times of the 15lh, however, refer to the announcement in a tone of confidence, observing—“ The Sultan has gratefully acceded to the terms recommended by the Conference of Vienna, and it is understood that the Principalities will speedily be evacuated.”

On the night of the|l2th of August, the subject find again been brought forward in the' House of Lords by Lord Malmesbury, in a long speech, which elicited a long reply, but scarcely a particle of new information, from Lord Clarendon. Several oilier noble Lords spoke on the occasion, pointing out with special force that, while the terms of the “note of mediation” were kept secret it was impossible to form a satisfactory conclusion either as to the consistency of the propositions with the obligations of the exigency, or the probability that their acccptance would establish peace on a permanent and honourable basis. On the whole, the stale of the question seemed to point to an amicable issue, but still left much reason anxiously to desire further information. Lord John Russell had promised to make “a short statement” in the House of Commons on the I Gill of August. The Queen had returned to Osborne after the Review of the Fleet, and was to remain there until the 26th, the birth-day of Prince Albert. Immediately after that celebration, the Court was to depart for Ireland, where the Queen was expected to remain for about a week at the Viceregal Lodge, and then proceed to her Highland residence in Scotland. . . . Her Majesty had

conferred the honour of knighthood on two members of the medical profession,—Dr. John Forbes, Physician to the Royal Household, and Dr, James Bardsley, of Manchester.

The potato-blight was said to be increasing in some districts along ihcsoulhern coast of Ireland, but the hulk of the crop through the country was regarded as safe and promising. . . . The Great Exhibition at Dublin was going forward prosperously, and visiters numbering from 9,000 to 10,000 daily: . . Preparations were in progress for the Queen’s reception. Her Majesty and Prince Albert were expected to enter Dublin on the 291h of August. The Arab ship Fazl Kereem , with the outward English mails for Bombay of June 24, had been wrecked on the passage from Aden, with a frightful loss of life. Out of 19! souls on board only H escaped. The authorities at Aden were much blamed for endangering not only the mails but so many lives in a wretched native craft.

SUPREME COURT. The Quarterly Session of this Court for Criminal business was held on Wednesday, be r ore His Honor Chief Justice Marlin. There were only two cases for trial, and they were on charges of a comparatively unimportant character. Roth prisoners were convicted ;one, a man named Walker, for stealing a roll of flannel from the shop of Mr. Alfred Jones; — the other, a sailor, named Hancock, for stealing a pig, value 51. theproperly of Mr. PetcrGrace. His Honor yesterday pronounced sentence. Walker having been previously before the Court on other charges, was sentenced to 12 months imprisonment with hard labour ; Hancock, having been recommended to mercy by the Jury, was sentenced only to 6 months.

Concert. —The Vocal and Instrumental Concert given by Mr. Davis, Band Master of the 58(h Regiment, on Wednesday evening, in the Odd Fellow's Hall, passed off in a manner that was equally creditable to the performers and gratifying to the audience. The selection of music was of a very popular character, consisting to a great extent of national melodies and other well-known compositions which are sure—whenthey arc executed as they were on this occasion —to command the applause of the multitude, and to afford pleasure even to (he more critical few who might wish (as some did wish on the present instance) that, without excluding these, there had been intermingled in (he programme a larger proportion of those more “ classical” pieces to which the Band of the 58lh have frequently proved themselves fully competent to render justice. It might seem invidious to particularize where there was really a continued uniformity of merit in the performance,— but, judging from the manifestations of gratification on the part of the audience, we should say that the solos on the Flute by J. Robotlom, and the Clarionet, by J. Kearns, and the songs by Miss Debus (in which her fine voice was well sustained by Robotlora’s tasteful accompaniment on the violin) afforded especial satisfaction. The Glee “ Hail Memory !” and the finale of “ God save the Queen” were also given in fine style. The various pieces by the Full Band were, without exception, performed with the precision and effect which might have been anticipated from a Band so well disciplined and in every way competent as that of the 58th. His Honour the Superintendent, with Mrs. Wynyard, and a number of the elite of our community formed part of an audience which filled the spacious room from end to end.

Fatal Boat Accident. —We regret to slate that no less than ten Natives of the Ngatimara tribe were drowned on Wednesday the 16th ult., as they were endeavouring to work their canoe, with a heavy load of kauri gum, potatoes, &c., from Waiheke towards Paparoa Point. The canoe was upset near the East Tamaki Head. We understand that five of the bodies have since been washed on shore, —three near Mr. Mason's residence, and two on the Howick beach. One of the later bodies has been recognised as (hat of Karauti, and the other that of the Chief Waiapu.

Extensive Sale of Landed Property. —We are given to understand that the Epsom properly, known as Mount Prospect, belonging to our enterprising fellow settler, Mr. Thomas Henry, has exchanged hands for iG.SOOZ.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

The New-Zealander. AUCKLAND, SATURDAY, DEC. 3, 1853., New Zealander, Volume 9, Issue 797, 3 December 1853

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The New-Zealander. AUCKLAND, SATURDAY, DEC. 3, 1853. New Zealander, Volume 9, Issue 797, 3 December 1853

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