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THE STORY OF A FAMOUS WARHORSE.

A famous regimental pet in days gone by was " Black) Bob," a horse which belonged to the Bth- King's Irish Light Dragoons-now Hussars, Black Bob was foaled at the Cape, and ho became the famous charger of Rollo Gillespie, Colonel of the "Royal Irish." The heroic Gillespie fell at Kalunga (1814), "and after that affair Black Bob was put up at auction, "with his saddle and housings still spotted with the blood of his gallant master." Gillespie was greatly beloved by the Royal Irish, and they determined not to let the charger go out of the regiment. I The upset price was 300 guineas, and an officer of the 25th Light Dragoons bid 400 guineas amongst themselves, and so Black Bob became their property. Black Bob always marched at the head of the regiment, and could distinguish the trumpets j of the Bth from those of any other I corps, It is said that he was parti- i cularly partial to the a ir " Garry-! Owen" always pricking up his ears' when the band struck up the national i tune. '• |

' j At length when the Bth were order- ■ cd home, circumstances rendered it : imperative that their "pet" should ! ho sold, and Black Bob was bought by a civilian at Cawnpore, to whom the Irish troopers returned half the purchase money on his solemnly uni dcrtaking that the old horse should pass the remainder of his days in comfort. But poor Bob had only been three days in his new quarters when he heard tho trumpets of the Bth as the regiment marched off at daybreak to embark for Calcutta. At the well-known sound the old horse became frantic, and made every effort to escape from his stable; until worn out with his exertions and well nigh strangled, he sank down exhausted. As days passed by, and Bob saw no more the familiar uniforms, and heard no more the trumpets nor the | voices of his old comrades, he began to pine away, refusing his corn and other food offered to him; so his owner had him turned out into a I paddock . But the moment he was free, Black Bob jumped the bamboo fence and galloped' off to the cantonments of the European cavalry. Making for the parade ground, tho old I horse trotted up whinnying to the j saluting point, and on the spot where ;he had so ofton taken post with Rollo Gillespie on his back, watching the squadrens of the Royal Irish march past, Black Bob fell down and , died.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NOT19120113.2.34.57

Bibliographic details

THE STORY OF A FAMOUS WARHORSE., North Otago Times, 13 January 1912, Supplement

Word Count
428

THE STORY OF A FAMOUS WARHORSE. North Otago Times, 13 January 1912, Supplement

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