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OUR LONDON LETTER. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) London, July 7.

Since the prospects of peace have becomo brighter there has been a corresponding increase in tho dullness of Parliamentary proceedings. Tho chief point of interest in them has turned upon tho debate with reference to tho summons of Indian troops for use in servico in Europe On the legal side of tho question, the Opposition made a very fair caso against tho Government j Lord Solborno, in tho HOUBO of Lords, arguing vory strongly against tho employment of the Sepoys by tho more authority of tho Crown, and without thoprovious consontof Parliament. The same lino was takon up in tho Commons by tho Marquis of Hartingfcon, who was vigorously supported by Sir \V. Harcourt, as also by Mr Fawcett, who spoke strongly against tho plea of emergency and secrecy which tho Chancellor of the Exchequer had at first urged. Mr Cross was the chief speaker on the Ministerial side, upon the resumption of the debate. At its close, tho majority for the Govornmont was 121 in a full houso, tho numbers standingfor the Government, 347 ; for the Opposition, 220. A groat figure has passed away from tho sphere of English politics. Earl Rusaoll, better known by his courtesy title of Lord John Russell, died at Pembroke Lodge, Richmond Park, on May 28th, at tho ago of eighty-six. Not many days before, Lady Russell had received a deputation, on his behalf, from the principal Nonconformist bodies, to present him with an address on "the fiftieth anniversary of tho repeal of tho Test arid Corporation Acts. The Earl himself was unable to receive it, and in fact was seriously ill at the time, though his doath was not immediately expected. No other public man has been so long or so well known in the present century, and it was in recognition of his great merits, no loss than a mark of nationnl rospect, that tho Quoon would have been glad that the (deceased statesman should be buried in Westminster Abbey, with a public funeral. By his will, however, Lord Russoll had laid strict injunctions that his body should lie with his ancestors, at Chonies, at which place, accordingly, ho was buried. Amongst other deaths which have had more than a personal interest, may bo mentioned those of the Duchess of Argyll, the wife of Mr John Bright, and Mr Russoll Gurnoy, M.P. Tho Royal Academy Exhibition was opened as usual at tho boginning of May. Lord Beaconsfield was present at tho banquet which preceded it, and was himself the chief speaker, praising tho English at the expense of tho Italian school of painting. Your correspondent has not had an opportunity yet of visiting tho exhibition, but those who know, declare it to be a very common-place year, and that there is little but landscape which is worth looking at. One of the most striking pictures is by Mr Mark—a study of bird life — called "Convocation." Turning from art to sport, the departure of the mail on Thursday just admits tho possibility of chronicling tho result of tho Derby day, yesterday, tho 6th of June. Tho blue riband of the turf was won by Sefton, a horse belonging to Mr W. S. Crawfurd. The raco itself was not a close one, Sefton never having been passed during the last mile. Count La Grange's Insulairo, who started fir«t favorite (having boon second for the Two Thousand Guineas), was again second ; while Lord Falmouth'sOhilperic ran third. Thoro was a large gathering of royalty, including Prince Hassan, of Egypt 5 but tho doubtful character of tho weather was the probable reason why the raco was not ro well attended by tho public as on former years. A fresh interest has boon added to the present cricket season by the arrival of a representative Australian team, of whoso performances one cannot speak too highly. In their opening match with tho County of Nottingham, they were cortainly beater —but that conteat was scarcoly a

fair ono for tho Australians, who had so recently arrived from * long voyage. Sinco then they have shown what things they aro capablo of. They have beaten, more or loss thoroughly, three of the best Clubs in this country — viz., the County Clubs of Yorkshire, Surrey, and tho Marylebono C.C. The Australians are especially strong in bowling power, but they are also exceedingly active in tho field, and careful with the bat. In thoir match at the Oval with the County of Surrey, it is said that as many as 15,000 persons paid entrance-money at tho gates. Thove is only room to chronicle very briefly the two attempts to assasiimte tho Emperor William of Germany. Iho flnt was made on tho 13th of May, and happily proved a failure. The would-be-assassin was ono Lehman, who fired two shots from a revolver at the Emperor on his return from ft drive. The second attempt was made last week by a man named Nobiling, who apparently is a person of education and property ; but having some personal grievance with respect to a public appointmont. Nobiling used the same weapon and tho samo opportunity, and this time with a result which oven now may bo fatal to tho Emperor. The shots from tho rovolver took effect in the side and cheek of the Pnperor. Veiy wide-spread horror lias on manifested at this outrage. Germany has also had to deplore tho loss of ono of her finest ironclads in a collision with another off Folkstono, by which it is supposed 340 livoa hivvo been lost.

The largest theatro in tho world, and that in which the greatest scope for exhibiting real sterling uorth, is to be found with the vast multitude of the nick and Buffering of tin human race. The applause awarded the proprietor of "Giiollau's (Jurat India v OutEs" from all par,s of this promising Colony of New Zealand, for the extraordinary performances of raising the sick from their beds of languishing, and restoring them lo hc.ilth, i* immense. In proof of which get the testimonials from the Chemists, and don't forget to buy tho medicines. jyi2

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Bibliographic details

OUR LONDON LETTER. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) London, July 7., North Otago Times, Volume 1948, Issue XXVI, 25 July 1878

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OUR LONDON LETTER. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) London, July 7. North Otago Times, Volume 1948, Issue XXVI, 25 July 1878

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