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SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. PORT OF OAMARU.

May 15.— High water at Oamtru, 7.15 p.m.

VESSELS IN PORT. Three masted schooner — Hera. Brig — Clematis 1 Topsail schooner — Tauranga. Ketch — Reliance.

INWARDS. Nil.

OUTWARDS. May 13 — Samson, p.s., Edie, for Dunedin. H. Aitken, ogent. Passengers : Miss Gifford; Messrs Little, Dnris, Graham, Alison, Reid, and Bain ; and 10 in the steerage. May 13. — Dagmar, soh, Connor, for Catlin's Kiyer, in ballast. F. J. Jeffreys, agent.

EXPORTS. Per Samson, for Dunedin — 1 cnse. Coggini ; 2 do, Eeid and Gray ; 4 do, Farthing ; 29 bdla and bags skins, 36 cks, Peefc ; 10 cs, 1 box, Lees nnd Moore ; 50 bags flour, J. and T. Meek ; 30 do potatoes, J. Robertson ; 3 saws, Galbraith and Co. ; 5 cs, Hunt. For Ljttelton.— 360 bags wheat, P. Cunningham nnd Co. For Port Chalmers — 50 bags, 40 i-bags flour, J. and T. Meek.

The topsail schooner Elizabeth Curio, Oapt. Stevens, sailed for Wellington at 9 a.m. on Saturday, with a full cargo of grain and breadstuff's. She left with a westerly breeze, -which, during the dav, drew to S.W., and -with such a favorable breeze she would make a good day'a run. The Union St«am Ship Company's p.s. Samfon, Captain Edie, shipped a large cargo of miicellaneom produce at the wharf on Saturday morning. The passengers (about 17) went down to the wharf by train at 10.30 a.m., and at 11.10 the Samson steamed from the wharf. The sea was calm and the wind light, N.W., so she would make a smart run down. The s.s. Matau, Captain TJrquhart, it due here from Dunedin at 2 p.m. to-dav, and leaves on her return trip at 10.30 a.m. tomorrow. The fore and aft schooner Dmgmar, Captain Connor, sailed for Catlin's Hirer in ballast, at 9.15 a.m. yesterday. We notise in the " Daily Times" of Saturday last that the topsail schooner Bencleuch, Captain Francis, cleared at the Customs, Port Chalmers, for this port, whence, after filling up with cargo she proceeds to Hokitika. The topsail ichooner Tauranga arrived in the Bay, from Dunedin, at 5 p.m. yesterday. There is something in a name, notwithstanding all that has been said to the contrary. One of the latest instances is furnished by the extraordinary career of the ship Foundling. It is now nearly two years ago ■ince a ship bound for this port sighted a large vessel on fire, and after heaving to, in order to render assistance if requisite, found that the crew had previously abandoned her. From that time up to September last a derelict hull haunted the track of Australian liners, was described by them in a variety of guises, and many were the suppositions as to her name, as piece by piece it had disappeared from her stern " until only LIV remained. Captain Wagstaff, of the Loch Lomond, who 8»w her in December, 1874, furnishes a sketch, the subject of an illustration published in the " Sydney Muil" upwards of a year ago. The Foundling was then in latitude 28deg. south, longitude 28deg. west. With, no hand at the •wheel — if such a thing remained — no sails to set, if she bad a crew to man her, she travels steadily over the trackless deep, until on September 7th the Promptipao saw her in 24deg. south, 43deg. west, the hull then almost level with the sea. A little later the smack Dolores fell in with the skeleton cruiser, and her skipper would have taken her in tow if liis emit had been a little more powerful. During the first week in October the port cap taiu of Paronugun, (Brazil) was astounded to tee riding in smooth water inside the bar at that port the hull of a large ship. On closer examination the hull was seen to be perfectly watertight, the railway material, the firebricks, the letters LIV, and the white £gurehead of a woman with a child in her armi, seen so often by passing craft, were there as means of identification. The islands outside the port, the bar within, had been passed in safety, and there in a secure haven was the Foundling, true to her name, discerered, after having drifted over some 20 deg. of longitude. Had there been left aboard ■ome fated being, such as the Ancient Mariner, to describe in Coleridge's poetin language all he saw, heard, and thought during his cruise, what a tale he could have told. — Echo.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NOT18760515.2.3

Bibliographic details

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. PORT OF OAMARU., North Otago Times, Volume XXIV, Issue 1275, 15 May 1876

Word Count
733

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. PORT OF OAMARU. North Otago Times, Volume XXIV, Issue 1275, 15 May 1876

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