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THE CUP DAY AT ASCOT.

The following gr&pbio picture of thi» celef bratod event we cKp "from the " Home News'* *f 14th Juno s— - The Cup ifiay at Atcot wat'as bright and •ummery as could be desired, and the atten* dance excellent. The royal State was not ■oppressively stately, but Tory effective. There it in it something more characteristic than if trumpetem and heraldi marshalled the way, and a squadron of ouirossed horsemen escorted a lumbering State coach. The crowd cheered *oudly as the prjuces drove on through the deep close-packed masses of subjects. In ■carlet and gold first rode four of the royal "huntsmen, preceding the Master of the Buokhounds on his gallant grey ; then there are two outriders in royal liveries ; and then in a barouche and four are the Prince and Princess of Wales, the Duke of Edinburgh, and Prince Arthur. People note with pleasure that the Prince of Wales is looking to the full as well as ever he did before his illness, and that his consort's delicate beauty has lost not a little ■of its aspect of fragility. In the next carriage are the Duke of Cambridge and the Duke of Teok, aud the three carriages which follow are 'occupied by the suite. When the royal equipages have driven within the enclosure and have disappeared amid cheering that it maintained While the last member of the toyal family is visible, people bethink theralelves again of the temporarily laid aside 'creature comforts, and Queen's Messenger wins the St. James's Palece Stakes to an accompaniment consisting of the gurgling of wine from the throats of bottles and the tinkle •of knives and forks. Marie Stuart has won the New Stakes by four length*, and then comes the spectacular interval of an hour between the race and the t?up. .From end to end of the huge stand are two tiers of brilliant costumes. At the entrance to the royal enclosure stands, with her grave, 'colorless face, Isabelle, the flower-girl of the Paris Jockey Club, arrayed in dress of green silk, with white lace apron and stomacher. Before her are fragant heaps of moss rosebuds ; her camellias she keeps in a box, to save them from the sun. The lawn is studded with groups of men, many of whom are notable in other spheres than on the sward of a race•course. There stands a Cabinet Minister, who, though absent from a Cabinet Council yesterday, is present here to day. That man marking off the running horses on his race-card hut commanded a British army in the field. Sy one of the pillars stands a peer who has made himself a name ai an author far outside the circle in which rank gives importance. And there the magnates, and law-givers, and tcigneurs of the sporting world — see how so runny of them and of their aristocratic disciples draw nigh, as if attracted by a loadstone, to the rails which partitiou off the " royal enclosure" from the " subscribers' stand," to •which are admitted the better elms of the professional betting men. A gentleman and the ring are on terms of the easiest familiarity. A loud-throated betting man, stretching over the rails, bellows the name of a peer ; the peer ■comes to the summons, and straightway a transaction concerning Henry ii recorded in the betting books of both. Interspered among the male loungers on the royal lawn, are not a few ladies ravishing ly attired. One Rets bewildered in an effort to realise which of the costumes is the prettiest. Is it that one of lemon-colored satin, with the peach green over it; or this one of white, with rose-colored tunic; or the other one of primrose, with point lace flounces ; or the long blue train Worn by that stately dame who is walking across the lawn? or the dress of the puzzling color that now seems a pale blue, anou a pale green? One cannot afford to get color-drunk when there is so much else to take note. Baron Rothschild comes out upon the lawn, and glances over the rails at Favonius being saddled in the paddock. The Prince of Wales has come out on the lawn, and is shaking hands at every step. His two brothers are there already. A cheer rings from the course as his princess comes to her window, and looks down on the scene below her. Among all the charming costumes there is none more charming than that of the princess — a light blue or French grey skirt, covered with white lace, and tunic of dark purple velvet, with sleeves and bonnet the tame oolor as the skirt. At another window of the Royal Pavilion stand two young Bavarian princes, • gravely contemplating the through spectacles. The Burmese amcome out upon the lawn, with their tiutky faces, white robes, and turbans of cloth of gold and jewels ; if they do not quite comprehend all they witness, they are evidently enjoying themselves, if one may judge by the heartiness of their laughter. Now the horses quit the paddock and come on the course, making two turns in a circle before the royal pavilion. Favonius, as is fitting, has the place of honor, and it seems the world to a China orange on the beautiful and racing-like chestnut. As the horses flash past in their preliminary canter, the princes and the Duke of Cambridge take up their position in the Jockey Club Stand, where Admiral Rons has been meditatively sitting bareheaded for an hour before. The race begins, the start announced, not by a thout, but by a loud murmur " They're off." At the horses canter past the stand the first time, Hannah leads, Favonius lying fourth. For a couple of minutes a wellbred indifference prevails, mingled with offers to bet from the betting men, occasionally responded to languidly by the "gentlemen." But as the horses enter the straight for the run home, the Utual fervor of the racecourse overrides any conventional restraints. Men •rush down towards the rails, breaths come quick, some faces flush and others grow pale, confused ahouts blend in chaos. " Favonius, Favonius," is the roar from the ring. /'Henry, by <5 !" gasps a duke, heedless of either the recording angel or of the lady at his elbow. '• Henry for a thousand ! Henry it is ! Henry I Henry !" are the shouts as the two horses flash past, the bay a length before the beautiful chestnut. Henry it is ; Fordham has once more galloped through a certainty as if it had bf en a paper hoop ; and as the numbers go up which record the conquest at Favonius) bis owner, Baron Bothschild, with an easy smile, tnakes an indifferent observation to the gentleman standing beside him. Those who took Ihe advice to "follow the baron" may be Wincing shrewdly ; the baron himself take* the defeat of his favorite like a genial Spartan.

A select committee of the Home of Commons, after sitting for four years, during wbioh it took volumes of evidence on the subject of »m*U-pox, sum* up, in a report dated May, 1871, as follows J — After careful consideration of this evidence, and of medical and other evidence, your committee agree with the general opinion — That the cow-pox jaiForda, if not art absolute yet a Tory great protection against an attack of small-pox* and an almost absolute protection against death from that disease. That if the opera* tion be performed with due regard to the health of the person vaccinated, and with proper precaution in obtaining and using lymph, there need be no apprehension that tncoination will injure health dr communicate discus?. I'hat stdall-pox, Unchecked by vac* Cination, is one Of the most terfible and destructive of diseases, at regards the danger of iftfootion, the proportion of deaths among those attacked, and the permanent injury to the survivors, and therefore that it is the duty of the State to endeavor to secure the careful tacciflatioh of the whole populations

MARA VILLA COCOA.— FobBbeakfast. — The " GHobo" says " Vurious importers and manufacturers have attempted to attain a reputation for their prepared Cocoas, but we doubt whether any thorough success has been achieved until Messrs Taylor Brothers discovered the extraordinary qualities of 'Maravilla Cocoa. Adapting their perfect system of preparation to this the finest of all species of Theobroma, they have produoed an article which supersedes every other Cocoa in the market. Entire solubility, a delicate arc ma, and a rare concentration of the purest elements of nutrition, distinguish the Maravilla Cocoa above all others. For homoeopath© and invalids we could not recommend a more agreeable or valuable beverage." Sold in packet only by Grocers, of whom also may be had Taylor Brothers Original Homoeopathic Cocoa and Soluble Chocolate. Steam Mills — Brick Lane, London. — £Advt.]

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NOT18720820.2.15

Bibliographic details

THE CUP DAY AT ASCOT., North Otago Times, Volume XVIII, Issue 757, 20 August 1872

Word Count
1,457

THE CUP DAY AT ASCOT. North Otago Times, Volume XVIII, Issue 757, 20 August 1872

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