Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

NEWS BY THE SUEZ MAIL.

The following additional telegrams of news are from the Melbourne Argus : — GENEEAL SUMMARY. London, February 20. Parliament opened on the 6th. The Queen's Speech expresses thankfulness for the recovery of the Prince of Wales, acknowledges the profound universal sympathy of the Empire, announces that the Queen intends to attend the thanksgiving services in St. Paul's, declares that foreign relations are satisfactory ; calls for redress, in the name of the Empire, for the dishonour of slavery practices in the South Seas, of which the murder of Bishop Patteson was the baneful consequence, and introduces a bill to facilitate the trial of traders in Australia, and so counteract the existence of slavery. The Government is unable to arrive at an understanding with France on a modification of the Commercial Treaty, but the good understanding on both sides is unimpaired. The Speech expresses a hope that the Alabama arbitration will proceed on a basis acceptable to tho English Government and nation ; mentions the San Juan arbitration Commission at Washington ; Ireland is free from crime, and trade is active ; the revenue has increased, and measures for the administration of affairs and the improvement of Ireland are announced. Bills to deal with Scotch education, mining, licensing, and the erection of two superior courts of justice, are promised. The speech concludes with the Queen's reliance on the loyalty of the people, and the energy and wisdom of Parliament to sustain the efforts of the Crown to discharge its duties, uphold the rights of the country, and defend the honour of the Empire. On the 7th, Mr. Disraeli severely criticised the Government. He complained of the meagre notice of the American claims, which exceed ■what would follow the total conquest of the country, and were preposterous. Mr. Gladstone accepted the responsibility of the Treaty, and would not make concessions. No people "with the Bpirit of Englishmen in the last extremity of war, or the lowest depths of national misfortune would submit to the absurd American claims. Earl Granvillo said the Government would not sacrifice the rights of the country, hut would endeavour to obtain a satisfactory solution of the difficulty. The address was passed. The Press is discussing the Alabama question. The Standard lashes the Government for a bungling treaty ; the Post cays the Government must get the ambiguity of the treaty rectified ; the Daily News believes a revision is called for ; the Observer says, a despatch has been sent to "Washington threatening the withdrawal of England if the indirect claims do not remain an open question. The American journals condemn the English journals for distrusting the tribunals of arbitration. The New York World Btates that the American case is probably framed to make capital for the Presidential election. England contends that the duties of neutrality "were faithfully carried out by her, and that representations of any breach oi the neutrality law by Mr. Adams, the American Minister, were invariably attended to — that suspected vessels were seized by the Government at great cost to the State — while at the same time no serious endeavour was made by America to capture cruisers. Gortschakoff seems disposed to support his protege Catacasey by refusing to accredit any successor to him for Washington at present. General Schenck telegraphed the English case to Washington on the sth. The Washington Cabinet, after discussion, adhere unanimously to the position assumed ; aud Secretary Fish telegraphed that the American Government will not recede in any event from the claim, maintaining that the British Commissioners perfectly understood that consequential damages would be claimed, and so did all the arbitrators also. Mr. Gladstone denied that there was any ambiguity in the treaty of Washington respecting indirect claims for losses. England had observed international obligations, and cannot offer the indemnity demanded. The Times sharply criticises the assertion that the treaty is not ambiguous. The majority of the American Press predict a compromise on the Alabama case, declaring war impossible. The House of Representatives at Washington rejected, by 69 to 62^ a motion of General Butler's, asking for a moro active attitude against England on the Alabama case ; the Senate temperately discussed the question. The Tribune Btrongly advocates the English interpretation. The American Senate rejected the Amnesty Bill pardoning rebels in the late war. Tho meeting ofDilke's supporters took place in Trafalgar-squaro on the sth, Odger presiding. 10,000 were present ; the speakers advocated the abolition of the hereditary system in the House of Lords. Many French Communists were present. The meeting was quiet. The new social scheme is again claiming attention ; Mr. Scott Russell has published a programme of measures, including the removal of •workmen to dwellings in suburban villages, at the cost of £150,000,100, the interest on which is to be raised by a property tax from the rich ; other points are equally Utopian. A mandamus has boon granted to hold an inquiry at Greenwich into the loss of the Q.ueen of the Thames. Disclosures made by officials regarding the disorganization of the Admiralty at the Megrera Commission will account for any disaster. Mr. Cowper is sending twelve 18-ton guns to Sydney by the Thyatira. A plea of insanity was urged in the case of the Rev. Selby Watson, the murderer of his wife ; and Miss Edmunds, of Brighton. They are both respited.

Mrs. Steele, head nurse at the Workhouse Infirmary, Manchester, is indicted for poisoning Mr. Harris, senior Burgeon, through revenge. The testimonial to the Baroness Burdett Coutts is likely to assume the form of a statue to Sir Francis Burdett. Brigham Young has surrendered to take his trial for murder. The sclieme for a tunnel under the English Channel is progressing ; a company is forming to execute the excavations. The Government j granted a concession. Dr. Livingstone's eon accompanies the expedition in search of his father ; it is three years since the last written tidings were received from him ; the Neio Yorh Herald published tidings of him through American explorers last year. The Freemasons' Tavern was refused to Sir C. Dilke for a demonstration. George Cruikshank claims to have originated the leading characters in Dickens'a work of Oliver Twist. There has been a strong medical discussion respecting the value of alcohol, caused by the publication of a circular against its use, signed by 250 eminent doctors. A new fish torpedo has been invented, fired from guns below the water-line ; the inventor has received a reward of £15,000. There is a great scarcity of silver. Professor Huxley has been ordered to Egypt for rest. The Saturday Review reports that Russia proposed an alliance with Turkey, threatening British interests in the East. Mr. Gladstone, Mr. Disraeli, and the Duke of Argyle have expressed grief at Earl Mayo's assassination, and sympathise with the family. The whole English Press comments feelingly on the tragedy. The Times set no political significance on the assassination. The naval preparations for Cuba continue, but a neutral observant policy "will be pursued as long as possible. Large discoveries of gold were made at the Peace River. A rush of miners from the Pacific is anticipated. The Duke of Argyle offered the Governorship of Madras to Earl Morley, who afterwards declined. It is rumoured that a meeting will shortly take place between Count Chambord and the Count de Paris. Count Chambord declared he would never abdicate, nor become King except by a resolution. The nomination as President of the Republic for life lias been abandoned, in consequence of the opposition of Thiers. A union of monarchists is considered impossible after Chambord's manifestos. The commercial treaty between England and France is the subject of much discussion. English despatches rectify the French misapprehensions of the treaty, which is binding for one year after the renunciation by the French Government; the report of the French Commission favours the renunciation ; England objects to a return to the protective system, but not to a revision of the tariffs. A tax on the merchant service has been adopted in the French Assembly. The Times, of January 29, believes that time will wear out the Mahommedan creed, which is opposed to British rule in India; the present Indian force, however, cannot be reduced. The French Assembly, by a large majority, authorized a movement, and denounced the treaties of commerce with England and Belgium ; it also rejected the proposal to return' to Paris; CasimirPerier consequently resigned, and Victor Lefranc wa9 appointed Minister of the Interior ; Gouhar, of Commerce. M. Druitt, Prefect of the Seine, resigned consequent on the refusal of the Assembly to return to Paris. Cardinal Antonelli is indisposed. Mr. Powell, a Conservative, has been 'elected for the North Riding of Yorkshire. Successive earthquakes destroyed the city of Schmachi, in the Caucasus. On the 14th the reserve of notes in the Bank of England was £13,500,000; bills discounted, £20,000,000 ; bullion, £24,750,000. The Press eulogises the administration of Lord Mayo in India; and says the Viceroy died a martyr to the highest calls of his country and faith. The Livingstone search expedition started on the 16th. Lady Mayo is to he created a British peeress. The names of Lords Northbrook and Dufferin are mentioned as the probable successors of the late Viceroy ; Earl Kimberley declined the offer. Port-Admiral Arthur Cumming is appointed Naval Coniinander-in-Ohief in India, vice Admiral Cockburn. Mr. Knatchbull Hugheson, in replying to Mr. James Elphinstone, in the House of Commons, promised to produce the papers and plans relative to the Paumben Channel question, and admitted the desirability of the work, whether done by Home, Indian, or Ceylon Government.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18720330.2.4

Bibliographic details

NEWS BY THE SUEZ MAIL., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXXI, Issue 17, 30 March 1872

Word Count
1,581

NEWS BY THE SUEZ MAIL. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXXI, Issue 17, 30 March 1872

Working