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ENGLISH SPORTING.

The extraordinary run of luck which attended Baron Rothschild on the turf this past season did not terminate with his Leger victory, for with his filly Corisande, also a daughter of King Tom, he carried off the first of the great Autumn Handicaps — the Cesarewitch. Colonel Pearson's gelding, Noyee Tauren, 5 yrs., 6st. 61bs., was an immense favourite, the favourable weight he carried making the race, it was supposed, a certainty for him, and he started in a field of twenty-seven at only 4 to 1 against him. Tho favourite, which was to prove such a " moral," never showed in the race, which, as we have said, was won by the Baron's three-year-old filly carrying 7st. 121bs, in splendid style, Cardinal York, 5 yrs., 9st., second. The following week, the lucky Barpn ran second for the Middle Park Plate — the two-year-old Derby, as it has been styled — and was only defeated by a short head. This rich prize was taken by Mr. J. Dawson's Prince Charlie, by Blair Athol, dam Eastern Princess, by Surplice, being his first performance in public; and Baron Rothchild's representative was Laburnum, by King Tom, out of Blooming Heather (sister to Blink Bonny). The favourite was Helmet by Trumpeter, who started at the ehort odds of 5 tO 2, while the two houses first placed stood at 11 and 12 to 1 against them respectively. Sixteen horses ran, including most of the best performers of the season, and the favourite again sustained a hollow defeat. Both Prince Charlie and Laburnum are magnificent colts, the first very much resembling his sire, but being very light below the knee he is not much fancied for next year's Derby, for which he ia entered, while on the contrary, the running of Laburnum caused him to be backed at once and placed at the top of the betting with Cremorne. Mention of the Middle Park Plate, naturally recalls the name of the founder of tho race, Mr. Bienkiron, who died at his seat at Middle Park, Eltham, on the 25th September. As the possessor of the largest breeding establishment of thoroughbred horses which ever existed, Mr. Bienkiron is known to all persons acquainted with the British turf. At the time of his death he possessed nearly 200 brood mares and twelve stallions, the pick of all England. To give value to his stock Mr. Bienkiron never suffered price to stand in the way of securing an animal he fancied — witness the 5,800 guineas he paid for Gladiateiu*, aud the 5,000 guineas he gave for Blair Athol. If he paid high prices for his breeding stock (last year he gave 2,000 guineas for Rosa Bonheur) his yearly sales of foals brought him great returns. In 1865 sixty-four realised for him 26,245 guineas, being an average of 410 guineas each ; the next year seventy -seven lots averaged 418 guineas each, after which the average of prices declined, although high prices continued to be paid for particular animals. The grand result of the Middle Park sales, between 1856 and 1871, was 807 yearlings, bringing 201,594 guineas; making as nearly as possible an average of 250 guineas each. Mr. Bienkiron was sixty-four years of ago, and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. Death has certainly been active among turf celebrities of late. Mr. Pedley and Mr. Goodwin had recently passed away, and on the 4th of October, the great Malton trainer, John Scott, terminated the most important race in which he had ever been engaged. Scott trai7ied no less than sixteen Leger winners, and his name was such a household word in Yorkshire, that a turf writer, " Tho Druid," recorded hia conviction that the women in the great northern county " fry ham all day, and the men talk about John Scott and John Osborne all night."

In one of his first law cases, General Butler said, in the usual way, when the case was called, "Let notice bo given." "In what paper?" asked the venerable clerk. "In the Lowell Advertiser," said Butler, selecting a local paper detested by the party to which the clerk and judges belonged. There was a pause. "The Lowell Advertiser !" said the clerk, restraining his feelings ; " I don't know such a paper." "Pray, Mr. Clerk," said Butler, "don't begin telling the Court what you don't know, or there will be no time for anything else." An active-looking boy, aged about twelve years, was brought up the other day before Provost Baker, at the Rutherglen Burgh Court, charged with breaking into gardens and Btealing fruit therefrom. The charge having been substantiated, the magistrate, addressing the juvenile offeuder, said in the gravest manner : '* If you had a garden, and pilfering boys were to break into it and steal your property, in what way would you like to have them punished?" " Aweel, sir," replied the 'cute urchin, " I think I Bhould let them away for the first offence." It is needless to add that the worthy provost was mollified, and that the little fellow was dismissed with an admonition.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18711213.2.9

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH SPORTING., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXX, Issue 65, 13 December 1871

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840

ENGLISH SPORTING. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXX, Issue 65, 13 December 1871

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