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SPORTING- NOTES. SALE OF YEARLINGS.

To racing men next in interest to the groat three-year-old races of the year, is the sale of yearlings by tho great breeders for the turf. The first lot of yearlings brought to tho hummer are generally those bred by her Majesty, and the sale at Hampton Court camo off this year on the 17th of June. Twentyfour animals were summitted to the hammer, the produce of Ely, Savernake, Asteroid, St. Albans, Trumpeter, Rataplan, and Lord Clifden — the St. Albans being in the greatest force. The total sum realized was 4,030 guineas, or close upon an average of 193 guineas each. The highest price given was for a colt by Trumpter, out of Ayacanora, by Birdcatcher, purchased by the Marquis of Anglesca for 950 guineas ; the next, a filly by the samo horse, out of Heptacia, by Voltiguer, brought 630 guineas ; a colt by Rataplan, out of Theodora, by Orlando, brought 530 guineas ; and a colt by St. Albans, out of Garnish, by Faugh-a-Ballagb, brought 510 guineas. The prices of the remainder were more moderate, eight selling for less than 65 guineas each. The sale of Sir Lydston Newman's yearling?, bred at Mamhead, iv the West of England, followed on Hampton Green. Sixteen were put up, but only ten were sold, and these brought 1,815 guineas, or an average of 182 guineas each. Theso were chiefly by Crater and King Tom — three out of the list going below 100 guineas, the highest price obtained being 400 guineas, for a filly by Crater, out; of Start Point, by Weatherbit. The next great sale was the first batch of Middle Park yearlings, bred by Mr. Blenkiron, who is tho largest breeder of thoroughbreds England has ever seen. Mr. Blenkiron does not stop at price to furnish liis stud with the best stallions and maren to be purchased in England, and he has his reward in the long prices he secures for his yearlings. At his first salo this year, held on the 18th of June, fifty-two lots were catalogued, and of these forty-nine were sold, for Ihe gross sum of 16,405 guineas, being an average of 335 guineas es?ch. Saunterer, Marsayas, Blair Athol, Gladiatenr, Trumpeter, Thormanby, King John, High Treason, and Weatherbit, wero the principal lords of the harem, and the highest prieo obtained was 1,800 guineas, for a colt by Gladiateur out of Battnglia, by Rataplan — a mave formerly owned by Mr. W. Robinson, of Cheviot Hills. The next highest in prices were a colt by Trumpeter, out of Isilia, by Ncwminster, 1,650 guineas ; a colt by Blair Athol, out of Terrific, by Touchstone, 1,500 guineas ; a filly by Marsayas, out of Hermit's dam, 1,150 guineas ; a filly by King John, out of Elspeth, by Birdcatcher, 720 guineas ; a filly by tho samo horse, out of Agra, by Birdcateher, 660 guineas ; a colt by Thormanby, out of Woodbine, by Stockwell, 650 guineas. These were the pick of the lot, 570 guineas being the next highest price obtained, then 430, two at 400, and so declining in price — nine out of the lot bringing less than 100 guineas each. At the sale ,at Albert Gate of the Hurstbourne Park yearlings, and those bred by Mr. T. T. Parker, very satisfactory prices were also obtained. Eight of the former sold for 2,980 guineas, giving an average of 373 each ; while the four of the latter brought 1,510 guineas, averaging above 377 guineas each. The highest price brought by tho Hurstbourne Park animals was 755 guineas for a colt by Trumpeter, out of Chase, by Venison ; the next wiis 500 guineas, for a colt by Sydmonton, out of Mazella, by Old Port. Mr. Parker's highest price yearling was 800 guineas, for a colt by Macearoni, out of Songstress ; and the next, 500 guineas, for a colt by the same horse, out of Superstition, by Birdcatcher. At the sale of the Cobham stud, on the 25th of June, the prices obtained for twelve yearlings were more moderate. A filly, by Wild Darrell, out of Swallow, by Cotherstone, brought 700 guineas ; and a filly, by Gladiateur, out of Infanta, by Orlando, 380 guineas ; the next highest being 210 guineas for a colt, by Lord Clifden ; two colts sold at 200 guineas each, and the remainder at low figures. The brood mare Swallow, with a foal by St. Alban's, was purchased by Mr. Blenkiron for 1,000 guineas; and Reginella, by King Tom, with a foal by Macearoni, went to the same stud for 820 guineas ; but the remaining mares went at prices from 105 guineas down to 60. Several other yearling sales took place in the month of July, and the following are a few of the best prices obtained :— filly by Cumbuscan, out of Penance, bred by the late Mr. Stephenson, 410 guineas ; colt by Chattenooga, out of Araucaria, bred by Mr. Naylor, 550 ; filly by Newcastle, out of Donna del Lago, belonging to Lord Stamford, 430 ; colt by Newcastle, cut of Lady Augusta, 600 ; colt by Cambuscan, out of Dulcibclla, 400 — both of tlies» being also from Lord Stamford's stud. A two-year-old filly by King Tom, also belonging to his lordship, sold for 750 guineas ; and his horse Normanby, which at one time stood well in the betting for the late Derby, brought 2,000 guineas. Those high-priced animals Blue Gown, purchased to go to France for £5,000, and the great steeplechase horse Colonel, purchased for £2,500 to go to Ger-

many, have both been beaten in their first races on the Continent. Blue Gown was defeated at Lyons in a handicap, in which ho was heavily weighted, by' a son of Flying Dutchman ; and the Colonel, in a steeplechase at Berlin, by Juryman, at evea weights. Tho entries for the great three-year-old races of 1872 show a failing off in number, which may easily be accounted for by the recent death or retirement of several prominent patrons of the turf, such as Earl Derby, Lord Glasgow, the Duke of Newcastle, and others. Tho entries for tho Derby number only 191, against 214 for 1871, and 252 for 1870 ; for tho Oaks, 175, against 177 for 1871, and 187 for 1870 ; for the Leger, 19R, against 216 for 1871, and 234 for 1870. The entries for the Derby are the lowest since 1855, Wild Dayrell's year. Tho maximum number of entries was made in 1866, Lord Lyon's year, when they reached 274. The entries for these races fluctuate greatly from year to year ; as for instance, in 1819, the Flying Dutchman's year, they numbered 237, while three years later, when Daniel O'Rourke carried off tho blue ribbon, they were only 181. A curious illustration of stupid reporting of a great race occurred in America concerning the late Derby. The correspondent of tho " American Press Association " made the Derby a heat race, and described the running in both heats. The accountis quite a curiosity of its kind :—": — " The horses have just been ranged near the starter's post, and all eyes are intently rivited upon the army of equine beauty and speed. The command was given, and like arrows all speed away with the fleetness of the wind. All along the course tho enthusiastic crowd cheered and yelled encouragingly, and the heat was warmly contested, each jockey outdoing himself under th£ influence of the encouraging plaudits. Neck and neck onward they flew, but Minister, who had obtained a slight load, fell off, and when they passed the judges' stand Kingcraft was a good first, followed by Palmerston second, and Munßter, who was set down for first, followed as third. Then rose one mighty cheer as the colours of Kingcraft went aloft, and his backers revived their wagers on his success in the succeeding heats. The partisans of McGregor, nowise daunted by the defeat of their favourite, renewed their vociferous wagers on their 'protege, while the friends of tho winner took all wagers against Kingcraft. Tho horses were conditioned, and all again ranged themselves for the second heat. Four p.m. — The confident backers of McGregor loudly yelled upon tho nppearance of their favourito, promising that he shall acquit himself well in the succeeding heats. The exitement was at a fever heat. Several vehicles broke down with their great loads of humanity. McGregor started, and retained the lead for a good two-thirds of tho distance, when Kingcraft, who had been following closely, wa9 brought down to his work, and he slipped past McGregor." A swimming match for £50 and tho five miles championship, came off on the Thames, from London Bridge to Greenwich Hospital, on the 18th of July, between White and Coulter. For half the distance Coulter had a good lead — at two miles, fully eight lengths, but from that point White steadily gained on his opponent, and at three miles he had nearly caught him. In another half mile Whito took the lead, which he maintained to the end, and won by fifteen yards, Coulter's exertions to catch him being fruitless, and at the close the latter wa3 so exhausted that he would have sunk had assistance not been, given him. Tho mutch occupied 1 hour 4inin. 35 sees., and was one of the finest ever swum.

Fhencii Generals. — The following notice of tho two generals to whom Napoleon confides tho chief conduct of the present war, will perhaps be interesting :—": — " Francois Certain de Cankobert entered the armj in 1830 as a private soldier. In 1835 lie had, risen to the rank of a sous-lieutenant, and in Africa, where he was then serving, lie rose to a captancy. At the storming of Constantino he was wounded on entering tho breach, and received afterwards the Legion of Honour. In 1846 he was lieutenantcolonel, and soon afterwards appointed a general o£ Zouaves. In 1850 he was made a brigadier-general, in 1852 aide-de-camp to Napoleon 111., and in 1853 a general of division. In 1854 he had command of tho first division of tho army of the Crimea under Marshal St. Arnaud ; and at the battle of Alma was wounded by a splinter from a shell. On the death of St. Arnaud ho rose to the command, and on tho sth November he was again wouuded at Inkermann. In 1855 he resigned his chiefship, and was superseded by Marshal Pelis9ier. 11l health compelled, him to return to Paris, and on tho birth of an heir to the Imperial throne in 1850 he was created a marshal. He was present at the battle of Magenta, and shared the command with Marshal M'Mahon. Canrobert is Gl years of age. Marie Patrice Maurice M'Mahon, Marshal of France, is the descendant of an Irish family, which, after living with distinction for many years in Ireland, risked all for the last of the Stuarb Kings. The M'Mahons mingled their blood by marriage with the old nobility of France, and obtained with the hand of an heiress the magnificent castle and extensive estates of Sully. The present general's father, the Count de M'Mahon, was an officer of high rank, a Peer of France, a Grand Cross of the Order of St. Lonis, and a personal friend of Charles X. He espoused a lady of the ducal house of Caravran, and left four sons and four daughters. The hero of the Malakoff and Magenta was the youngest son. He entered the French military service in 1825, and in 1830 he distinguished himself in Algeria. After the battle of the Col de Torchia, in which he was aide-de-camp to General Archard, the latter said to him, " Can you carry to Colonel B. Rullieries at Bildah the order to change his march ? As the mission is dangerous, I will give you a squadron of Light Dragoons as an escort." The young officer refused the escort, declaiming that it was either too little or too much, and went alone. On arriving within half-a-mile from Bildah he saw groups of the enemy's horsemen on each side as well as behind him, but he rode on until he came to a deep precipice, at which he drove his horse, a high-blooded animal, at a tremendous pace. The horse sprang into mid-air, tho rider held hia seat firmly, but when they alighted together he wa3 obliged to abandon his charger, which had broken both its forelegs. Nono of tho Arabs would take the desporate leap, and the young officer reached Bildah in safety. In 1848 M'Mahon had risen to the rank of General of Brigade, and when Canrobert left the Crimea M'Mahon succeeded him as a General of Division. When the final assault on Sebastapol was determined upon it was to this brave and skilful officer that the task of carrying the Malakoff was assigned. The manner in which he executed that task, as well as the gallantry with which he pressed forward and secured the battle of Magenta, must be fresh in the memory of our readers. Marshal M'Mahon was born at Autun, in 1807. He is consequently 63 years old. • A Madras Judge's Opinion op the Calcutta High Court. — The Madras Atlienceum is responsible for the following : — " In a regular appeal which came on for hearing yesterday before the Appelate side of the High Court, Mr. justice Holloway and Mi\ Justice Innes presiding, Mr. Vakeel Sunjeevee How quoted a decision of Sir Barnes Peacock, late Chief Justice of Calcutta, upon a point under the Limitation Act, when Mr. Justice Holloway remarked that it was useless reading such trash, and that the Vakeel had better confine himself to the grammatical construction of the section, and that he (Mr. Justice Holloway) could distinguish that case from tho present one, if it was necessary, and, at some future time, he would probably extinguish it as far as this High Court was concerned. The learned judge further remarked that he dissented from many of the Full Bench rulings at Calcutta, and that it was quito true, as Lord Eldon once remarked, that the decisions of the Scotch Judges wore always bad when they were unanimous. It would be found, added his Lordship, that many of theso Calcutta rulings were the productions of one man, whilst tho other jackasses followed suit." Sir Barnes Peacock, who resigned the Chief Justiceship a short time ago, had a very exalted idea of himself and of his office, and had ho not left India, there is no knowing what Bteps ho might not have taken against the Madras judge.

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SPORTING- NOTES. SALE OF YEARLINGS., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIX, Issue 76, 21 September 1870

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SPORTING- NOTES. SALE OF YEARLINGS. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIX, Issue 76, 21 September 1870

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