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THE SUEZ MAIL.

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. The Tararua, with the New Zealand portion of the mails via Suez, arrived in harbour on Sunday morning. In addition to the telegraphic news published in our issue of Saturday, we are enabled to glean from our files of Melbourne papers, and the European Mail, the following additional English and Foreign intelligence: — London, June 17. Discount 3 per cent. Consols for money, 92£ to 92f . For the account, 92£ to 92f . The April mail via Marseilles was delivered in London on the 13th of June, and that via Southampton this day. The mails from New South Wales and New Zealand, via San Francisco, were delivered in London on Tuesday, June 14. The paralytic seizure of Charles Dickens while at dinner at his bouse, at Gadsbill, created immense sensation. He died the next day at six p.m. Fears were entertained by the public lest he should have left directions in bis will which would have prevented his burial in Westminster Abbey ; but although he particularly ordered that all pomp and pageantry should be avoided, yet no mention was made therein as to where he wished to be interred. Consequently, on Tuesday last, he was buried in Westminster Abbey. The funeral was quite private, no one but members of the family being present. During the day thousands of persons visited the grave, which was not closed until the next day. Mr. J. E. FitzGerald, formerly Chief Secretary of New Zealand, and now Comptroller of the Colonial Exchequer, has been gazetted a companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George. The 12th, 14th, 18th, 40th, 43rd, 50th, 57th, 58th, 67th, 68th, 70th, and 96th Eegiments, are henceforward to bear the name of New Zealand ou their colours. Viscount Mahon has been elected in tho Conservative interest for East Sufforlk, and Mr. Balie Cochrane, also a Conservative, has been returned for the Isle of Wight vice Sir J. Simon, deceased. Mr. Buck, the Tasmanian Emigration Agent, has despatched the ship Victoria from Hamburg to Hobart Town with 187 valuable emigrants. Sir Charles Mordaunt has determined to appeal to the House of Lords to re-open the question of divorce, which was refused to be considered in consequence of his wife's insanity. Several boat accidents have occurred lately; one very fatal one at Hastings, where a plea-sure-boat capsized, and fifteen persons were drowned. The case of the men who assumed women's clothes for improper pui poses, was closed, and they were committed to take their trial, but the trial was postponed until the next sessions. A large number of persons are implicated, and warrants have been issued for their arrest. Some have surrendered themselves. The smallpox which was so prevalent in Paris, is now declining. The French Government lately proposed to send a commission, including two magistrates, to inquire • into and report on the criminal code of England. By the latest Cable, gold in New York is 113*. The President, in a recent message to Congress, refuses to recognise the Cuban insurgents as billigerents, and the House of Representatives passed a resolution authorizing the President to remonstrate with Spain respecting the barbarous manner in which the war against the Cuban insurgents was carried on, and to solicit the interference of other governments to secure from the contending parties the observance of the laws of civilized warfare. Obituakt. — Sir Norman Macdonald Lockhart, Sir John Simeon, Colonel Macdonell, Baroness De La Zouch, Cyrus Redding, Countess Vitzamacche, Counsul Cameron, Sir James Clarke, her Majesty's physician ; Lord Arthur Clinton, Sir Archibald Bogle. July 4. The Earl of Clarendon died, after a severe attack of diarrhoea, on the 27th June. It is expected that the Earl of Granville will succeed him as Foreign Secretary. In the House of Commons the amendments on the Education Bill, providing for the gratuitous education of children, were rejected. The revenue of Great Britain for the last quarter was £16,307,594. The Vice- Chancellor has dismissed the petition for winding up the European Life Society on the ground that the petitioners had not paid the calls that had been made. Mr. Stackpoole stated in the House of Commons that a contract had been entered into for the carriage of the mails to the East and Australia via Brindisi. A severe drought was anticipated in England, but rain has recently fallen throughout the country. The House of Representatives at Washington have adopted resolutions proposed by General Butler, requesting President Grant to inquire of the English Government ,by what right American fishing boats are stopped in their operations on fishing grounds. The Corps Legislatif has rejected, by a vote of 112 to 31, a petition presented by the Orleans princes requesting permission to return to France. The contingent vote to the French army of 90,000 men, was passed by 203 votes against 31. The Spanish Government are still negotiating with new candidates for the throne. An earthquake has occurred in the island of Santoria, in the Grecian Archipelago. One town was destroyed, and a small island submerged. The ship Aurora, which left Bombay on the 12th June, was burnt at sea, fifty-five miles from Bombay, under very suspicious circumstances. The captain, the carpenter, and the brokers who chartered the vessel, have been arrested, aud bail was refused.

There is great excitement prevailing in consequence of this and other frauds. July 11. The Prince of Hohenzollern lias announced his candidature for the crown of Spain under constitutional government. The French Government have announced that they would consider the enthronement of the Prince of Uohenzollem as a threat ; and that as soon as they were convinced of the determination of the Spanish Ministers to persist in the candidature of that Prince, they would break off diplomatic relations. As to Prussia, she must refuse her sanction to the Prince of Hohenzollern as the ruler of Spain, for France would not suffer any foreign Power to place him on the throne. This manifesto was received with loud applause in the French Assembly. It is un- , derstood that the Cabinets of London, Florence, and Vienna are disposed to join in the diplomatic action taken by France. There is great excitement in France on this subject, and a panic on the Exchanges of Paris and London. The journals censure General Prim's project, which is calculated to wound the legitimate susceptibility of France in connection with the new position of Prussia in Europe. The reply from Prussia regarding Hohenzollern's candidature is considered unsatisfactory, and France has ordered immediate military preparation. The Prussian journals state that their Government is quite disinterested, and consider war impossible ; but there is a great fall in the funds. The Spanish Minister of "War has ordered all conscripts to join their regiments, and proceed to the occupation of strong strategic positions on the northern frontier. There are strong hopes entertained of a peaceful solution, but the King of Prussia has admitted having authorised the Prince of Hohenzollern to accept the Crown of Spain. He promised a definite reply to the demands made upon him by France. On the reception of the Prussian circular, the majority of the French Press exhibited a warlike tendency. M. Lesseps is visiting England, and he is to be decorated with the order of the Star of India. The House of Lords has passed the third reading of the Irish Land Bill. [Eeutek's Last Telegram.] London, July 14. The Spanish ambassador at Paris has received a telegram from the Father of Prince Hohenzollern, announcing that he has telegraphed General Prim renouncing his son's candidature. The general belief is that peace is thereby secured; but no official communication on the subject has yet been made to the Chambers by the French Government. In the House of Lords, Earl Russell, in calling attention to the relations of England with the colonies, moved that a Commission of Inquiry be appointed to consider the best means of guaranteeing the security of the Queen's dominions. Lord Northbrook (?) denied that the Government desired any severance of the existing ties between England and her colonies. Successive Governments and Parliaments had laid down the principle, that colonies enjoying constitutional privileges were bound to a great extent to undertake their own defence. The necessity that existed for the concentration of troops at home to ensure the security of the empire, and properly to relieve regiments on service abroad, compelled them to pursue the course they had taken. The scope of the inquiry was too gigantic for any Commission to take the responsibility of trenching upon the functions of the Executive. Earl Grey said that the principles enunciated by successive Colonial Secretaries must necessarily lead to the dissolution of the colonial empire. The time had arrived for defining their mutual relations. Earl Granville strongly urged Earl Russell to withdraw his motion, which was withdrawn accordingly. [From tho European Mail, Juno 17.] Dr. Foatherßtone and Mr. Bell, have both been on the Continent enjoying themselves lately. On 2nd June, Mr. George Verdon was elected a fellow of tlio Royal Society. Amongst the calls to tho Bar, on 10th June, was that of Mr. Thomas Prout Webb, 8.A., of Melbourne University. Tho Rev. Dr. O. J. Abraham has completed his resignation of the Bishopric of Wellington, and will act henceforth as coadjutor of the Bishop of LichGeld. Tho Atlantio and Pacific Steam Navigation Company have abandoned that portion of their scheme botween Milford Haven and San Erancisco, and now only contemplate running steamers from tho latter place to New Zealand. They propose to go first to New Caledonia, thence to Sydney, where branch steamers will start for Tahiti and New Zealand. That colony will, it is expected, bo induced to accord the company a subsidy of say £25,000 ; New South Wales a like sum } whilo France, which has strong political considerations at stake, will probably bo ■willing to grant a much larger amount. Another company, it is said, is ready to take up the lapsed portion of the enterprise between Milford Haven and San Francisco. In the llouso of Commons, on May 26, allusion was made to tho desertion of sailors from tho Flying Squadron, on its visit to Victoria. It was said that tho Victorian Government treated tho crews so libomlly, Riving them freo passes over tho railways, and otherwise showing them hospitality, that many of the tars determined to become Victorians, and honco left their ships in the lurch. It is to bo hoped thoy will bo found useful and tractable citizens. Tho Duko of Edinburgh's Diary of his visit to Australia is to bo published in a monthly magazine. Mr. B. Fargeon, tho late editor of tho Otago Daily Times, is rupidly assuming a position in tho literary ■world here. His recently published novel, "Griff," has had considerable success. Another work from Mr. Bonwick, entitled " Curious Facts of Old Colonial Days," has been announced. This indefatigable writer displays groat ability in tho treatment of his subjects. It has been oflioialy announced that orders have beon issued for tho withdrawal of all tho oHlcers and subordinates of tho Army Departments from Australia, one officer being loft temporarily in each colony, viz : Victoria, Western Australia, and New Zealand, to Bettle all claims against tho Government, and to make arrangements for tho future payment of pensions in those colonies. An official return of English troops in tho Colonies has latoly been published. According to it, there appears to havo been 1.G95 soldiers in Australia in 18G0, and 09 1 in I860; in New Zealand 1,120 in 18G0, above 10,000 in 186 1 and 18C", 0,092 in 1860, 2,820 in 1867, 911 in 1868, and 797 in 18G9. On June 6, whilo the Rev. Mr. Armstrong was preaching a sormon on tho uncertainty of life, in the Wesloyan chapel, Baliol Road, Bootle, a young woman, twenty ilvo years of nge, named Ann M'Cluaky, foil buck in her scat, and died instantly.

Sir Charles Mordaunt and party have been on a fishing excursion to Banavie. Sir Arthur Guinness has ' offered to purchase the Exhibition building for £53,000. It is said that the Greek Government will allow Mrs. Lloyd a pension of £400 a year. There is now living, at the Brentford Union, Isleworth, an old woman who has reached the ago of 103 years. She was born at Broseley, Salop, and baptised February 15, 1767, at the parish church of Broseley. The Great Eastern steamship was off Penzance on the sth June, having made the voyage from Aden to England in fifty-four steaming days. She proceeded, with the sanction of the Admiralty, to her former moorings, off Sheerness Dockyard. On the 27th May, Laurence and Margaret Shields, brother and sister, were executed at Tullamore, for the murder of a man named Dunn. They stood hand in hand upon the scaffold, repeating tho Litany of the Saints as the drop fell. Shields was twentyfour years of age, and his sister 29. One of the largest trout caught of late years was taken by Mr. Forbes, of Chertsey, the other day, at Chertsey Wear. This magnificent fish weighed 14£lbs., measured twenty-six inches in length, and twenty-one inches in girth, so that he must have been in splendid condition. As soon as Mr. W. Fowler rose to ask leave to introduce a bill to repeal tho Contagious Diseases Act, Mr. Craufurd called attention to tho presence of strangers in the galleries ; in consequence, all visitors, including the representatives of the press, wero excluded from the House whilo tho debate upon this subject was going on. The gallery remained closed for four hours, and upon the readmission of the reporters, it was stated that on the motion of Major Anson, the adjournment of tho question for a month had been carried by 229 to 88. Mr. Gilpin has given notice of the following resolution; — "That, in tho opinion of this House, it is undesirable that it should continue in tho power of any individual member to excludo the public and press from the debates in the House by observing that there aro strangers present." At every step you take in London at present, says the Anglo Australian, you meet old colonists, who seem to havo gravitated to England in multitudes this year. Some intend to settle permanently hero, others only to havo a look round and go back to whence they came. Whatever their object, there is no mistaking them. They have a jaunty, independent air, and a nonchalant manner of talking that immediately identifies them. Although their pockets aro generally, it is to be supposed, pretty well lined, they are not particularly free with their money, and generally as tho Baying is, " look at a shilling before spending it." It is a phenomenon as old as the hills, that it is generally the men with considerable means who are the most " canny " and careful in pecuniary matters, for they have a stake sufficient to excite tho exercise of any economical talent thoy possess ; and on tho other hand, the vast class of individuals with, so to speak, " nothing at all," aro as a rule reckless in their expenditure as far as it goes. Hence, soldiers and sailors with " a shilling a day" Bpend more in proportion to their incomes than Rothschilds or Barings. The Grand Stand at tho Derby was thickly sprinkled with colonists. There might be noticed ex-Governor Sir George Grey, and on the course were Dr. Featherstone and a crowd of folks from Australia and New Zealand too numerous to mention. The melancholy thing about the otherwise happy class of successful returned colonists soem to be that they aro restless to a degree to interfere with true enjoyment ; and their desire to be noticed and lionised in ever so stusvll a way, exhibits itself oppressively, and bursts out disagreeably under disappointment. Their wives are infected with tho same idiosyncrasy, but havo the tact and the good tasto to show it less. Probably the circumstances that in many cases thoy have been little kings or queens in their own colonial spheres, has unfitted them for playing what is vulgarly termed " second fiddle " at home. Some amongst them are inclined to show too plainly also, that thoy estimate their fellow-beiugs pretty much by the size of their respective money-bags ; and such expressions as "He has £7,000 a-year at tho very least ;" "he has made a pretty good pile," crop up every five minutes in their conversation. As a rule, too, they are not reading folks. They have ordinarily been too busy with their material interests to bother themselves much with moro intellectual matters. But in spite of all, there is an originality about them that is attractive, and if they are self-satisfied, they are usually very goodhumoured. What sort of a race will tho Australians be a hundred years hence ? Judging from those who at present visit England, if their national characteristics, so to speak, go on developing, thoy will have much of tho mercurial temperament of the French, possess great sensitiveness, but less of robust mental energy than the inhabitants of the mother-country, Suoh speculations, however, are neither here nor there, and I must go off at a tangent to more practical subjects. The medal for service in New Zealand has been presented to tho undermentioned non-commissioned officers and men of the Supply Branch of the Army Service Corps at Aldershott : — Staff-Sergeant J. Fisher, Sergeants J. Jones, W. Ramsay, and H. Palmer ; Corporals C. Smyth, J. Trott, T. Baillie, and R.S. Kirby j Privates H. Berry, W. Brook 3, J. Coates, P. Cullinan, N. Davies, W. Fowler, E. Goodman, J. Hopkins, C. Leonards, J. Minniken, J. Mountford, J. Mullen, J. Steene, and J. Wager. The medals wero distributed by Captain Milne. The Derby claims precedence of all sporting matters. The weather, on the whole, was propitious, for though not so warm as one might expect for Juno, it was genial and invigorating. Macgregor was the favourite at starting, but as is commonly the case with pets, he disappointed his admirers by his performance, and the Blue Riband was carried off by Kingcraft, to the delight of tho bookmakers, and the no small chagrin of the prophets ; Palmerston being placed second, and Muster, an outsider, third. The Oaks was carried off by Gamos, an outsider, Sunshine being second, and Pate third. Ascot attracted thousands of visitors during the race week, mid among them the Prince and Princess of Wales. The King o' Scots, who was nowhere for the two thousand Guineas, carried off the Prince of Wales Stakes, and Sir F. Johnstone's Judge the Royal Hunt Cup. The Gold Cup was won by the favourite, Sabinus. It being a condition of tho yacht match, for the 100 guineas cup presented by the Prince of Waleß, that an American schooner yacht should take part in the contest, it may be postponed, as Mr. Douglas, of the Sappho has refused to enter his yacht. All, therefore, dopends upon tho decision of Mr. Bennett, of the Dauntless, who is now upon tho continent. The American Government has determined to rebuild Fort Sumter, in Charleston harbour, in order to preserve this relic of the opening of the late civil war. Although belonging to an obsolete stylo of fortification, tho fort is to be restored nearly to its original condition, so as thoroughly to recall tho past. Three gentlemen residing respectively in Washington, Quebec, and Toronto, havo issued an invitation to the people of the United States and Canada to attend a convention at Niagara Falls, on the 4th of July next, " to see about annexing the two countries to each other." So the three tailors of Tooley-street have their imitators in America. Intelligence from Mexico announces that a violent earthquake has occurred at the city of Oajaca. Over 100 persons were killed, and a large number injured. Other towns, and some mines in the State of Oajaca, wore damaged. A Russiau nobleman, Count Koucheleff, a man of enormous wealth, and a well-known amateur of art, has died suddenly at St. Petersburg, from the effects of an apopletic attack. By his will his vast properties passed to his nephew, and his brother-in-law, the notorious spiritualist medium, Mr. Douglas Home, derives no benefit from that document. Tho walls of Sebastopol havo now been completely restored, and upwards of 300 houses built in place of those ruined by tho bombardment. A new marble church in the form of a pyramid, has also been erected in tho churchyard of tho town. The funds for the construction of this building were raised by a public subscription in tho whole of Russia. The chief of the subscribers was tho Princess Wuhsiltchykoff who gave up for that purpose tho whole of her years pension I amounting to 15,000 roubles. A sum of 200,000 j

roubles in all was expended on the building. The principle monument in the churchyard is that of Prince Michael Gortchakoff. On it is the following inscription : " Hero lio among wai'riors, tho mortal remains of the man who prevented the enemies of our country from penetrating to this, spot." The tombstones of the men are all alike in shape and size, and each boars tho inscription : " Grave of our brothers." A village near Genoa has been destroyed by Hre. Through, this calamity fifty-five families are -without a home. A band of fifteen brigands, having murdered three shepherds in Thessaly, were pursued by Turkish troops, but escaped by crossing the Greek frontier. A fire was raging on May 28 in the forests of the Saguenay region in Canada, an area of five miles by thirty. A number of persons perished in the flames, and 300 families in the villages of Saguenay are rendered destitute. FRANCE. Prince Napoleon is unwell at Meudon. Owing to the continuance of the drought, flour has risen five francs. In reference to the recent plot against the Emperor, the Gazette dcs Tribunaux publishes the following particulars respecting the recent discovery of now explosive bombs, nine of which were found in the canal : — " Tho police have seized, at the house of a member of the International Working Men's Association, 220 capsule cases, apparently destined to be fixed to bombs filled with fulminating powder, and also seditious pamphlets and political letters of a highly compromising nature. Other proofs, which will be useful in the prosecution for conspiracy, have been discovered at tho residence of four other persons, who havo also been arrested. Lord Lyons was present on June 7 at the sitting in Paris of tho Parliamentary Committee ou Naval affairs. A great fire took place on June 6 in the forest of Fontainebleau, when 200 acres ure said to have been devastated. A terrible railway accident took place on May 27 near the tunnel of St. Benoit. The locomotive and six carriages ran off tho rails, were precipitated down a high embankment, and broken to pieces. Two persons were killed, and several others very seriously hurt. M. Ollivier has just sent a judge, M. George Picot, and a deputy judge advocate, M. Alex. Ribit, to England, on a mission to inquire, for the benefit of tho Committee of Revision of tho Criminal Code, how the English manage to allow an accused party professional advice and a public examination immediately after his arrest, without frustrating the ends of justice. A wonderfully old man, whose name is yet familiar to the scientific world that ho passes as one of the present generation — M. Moreau do Jonuos — has just died at tho age of 93. He was aide-de-camp of General Hoche. At tho restoration, he resigned his commission in the army, and ever afterwards devoted himself to statistics. His " Statistique Generale de la France" is a classic work. Tho small-pox epidemic in Paris appears to be gaining ground. Altogether this disease has caused over 2,000 deaths since the begining of the present year. The general death-rate of Paris has been 10 per 1,000 in excess of that of London for many weeks past. Tho Minister of Public Works, stated in reply to a question of General Menabrea that Mont Cenis Tunnel would be completed by the cud of next year. ITALY. A lettor from Lisbon in tho Independence Italienne explains the cause of the rupture of diplomatic relations between the Portuguese Government and the Marquis Oldoini, the Italian Minister. Immediately after the late pronunciamiento , the Marquia paid a visit to tho Queen, who, it will bo remembered, is a daughter of Victor Emmanuel. This visit, which it is declared was one of mere courtesy, and thoroughly justified by what had taken place, displeased Marshal Saldanha, who, moreover, accused the Italian Minister of liuving made certain objectionable remarks upon the events that had occurred, and refused to hold any further official intercourse with him. The Marquis has since left Lisbon. A despatch from Rome states that in the discussion of the articles of the Infallibility schema, Mgr. Dupanloup, the Bishop of Orleans, spoke energetically, and amidst the deepest attention of the Assembly, against tho tendency of a certain school to exaggerate the rights and perogatives of the Pope. It was expected that the discussion would terminate at the end of the present week without any noteworthy incident, although seventy-two membera of the Council, including, it is said, fifteen French prelates, had put down their names to speak against the dogma of Infallibility. Another account states it is no longer doubted that the Council will vote the dogma of the Pope's personal infallibility, with the penalty of anathema against those who refuse to accept it. ' TURKEY. It is stated in the Levant Times that the amount of property destroyed by the great fire in Constantinople exceeds five millions sterling, and that the loss of life has been fearful. Up to June 8, more than a thousand dead bodies had been found, but the number of persons reported to be missing was 2,400. The editor of the Levant Times, the clerks, and the compositors, were all burnt out, and saved nothing but their lives and those of their families. UNITED STATES. A party of Fenians, having refused to enter the car at Williamstown, New York, were fired upon by the Federal troops, and several were wounded. Tho House of Representatives has appropriated 100,000 dollars in aid of the Arctic expedition. It is reported that a firat-class European Power has offered 2,000,000 dollars for Samana bay, in case the United States should repeal tho pending Annexation Treaty. Thirty bachelors in Lansing, lowa, have sworn a solemn oath they will marry none but widows. At a premium at last, for the bachelors have all turned sixty-five. A Maine Yankee has invented a five-dollar sewing machine, which is about as large as a four-bladed jack-knife, is self-feeding, and knits a perfect elastic seam. It looks like an apple-parer or a nutmeggrinder. A fat lady of Albany says : — " I am so fat that I pray for a disappointment to make me thin. No sooner does the disappointment come, than the mere expectation of growing thinner gives me such joy that I become fatter than ever." According to the usual monthly statement of the Secretary of the Treasury, tho public debt of the United States amounted on June 1 to 2,645,000,000 dollars, being a decrease of 14,250,000 dollars since May 1. The coin in the Treasury amounts to 100,750,000 dollars, and the currency to 14,250,000 dollars. MaiuiiAO-e Extraohdinaby. — The following is taken from the Times : — Married in Salt Lake City, Utah, on the lGtli April, in the presence of the Saints, Elder Brigham Young to Mrs. J. R. Martin, Miss. L. M. Pendcrgast, Mrs. R. M. Jenickson, Miss Susie P. Cleveland, and Miss Emily P. Martin, all of the county of Berks, England. Maiu villa Cocoa.— For Breakfast. — The Globe say 9 :—": — " Varioxis importers and manufacters have attempted to attain a reputation for their prepared Cocoas, but we doubt whether any thorough success had been achieved until Messrs. Taylor Brothers discovered the extraordinary qualities of 'Maravilla' Cocoa. Adapting their perfect system of preparation to this finest of all species of the Theobroma, they havo produced an article which supersedes every other Cocoa in the market. Entire solubility, a delicate aroma, and a rare concentration of the purest elements of nutrition, distinguish the Maravilla Cocoa above all others. For homoeopaths and invalids we could not recommend a more agreeable or valuable beverage." Sold in packets only by all Grocers, of -whom also may be had Taylor Brothers' Original IToinoeopaihic Cocoa and Soluble Chocolate. I Steam Mills—Brick Lane, London. 1485

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THE SUEZ MAIL., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIX, Issue 66, 17 August 1870

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THE SUEZ MAIL. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIX, Issue 66, 17 August 1870

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