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TURF NOTES.

Although intelligence of the result of the running for the Two Thousand Guineas, the One Thousand Guineas, and the Chester Cup, was furnished in the telegram received with the last mail, we have no account of the running of these races. The latest papers speak of the substitution of Macgregor for Sunlight, as Mr. Merry's representative for the first-named race, and the scratching of Camel and Bridgewater. Kingcraft still remained at the top of the betting (7 to 2), King o'Scots standing next at 7 to 1, and Macgregor and Stanley each at Bto 1. It will be seen by this, that the " dark " Macgregor, on whom so much money had been invested at outside odds during the winter, rose considerably in estimation when it came to be suspected that his owner, with two Buch clippers in his stable, was intending to trust his colours in the Two Thousand to the son of Maccaroni. All we know at present is the triumph of Macgregor, and that Kingcraft, the favourite, was third ; Norman by, who had at times stood well in the betting, being second. In the absence of Sunshine, Hester, Frivolity, and Mahonia, running first, second, and third, for the One Thousand Guineas, confirmed the running of the fillies last year. Frivolity, from having won the Middle Park Plate, was the favourite j but Hester was so good an animal, and had wintered so well, that her victory could create no surprise. The defeat of all the favourites for the Chester Cup, and the success of Our Mary Ann, the veriest outsider in the race, must have come like a thunderclap on the ring ; but Formosa and Sabinus, two of the leading favourites, running second and third in the race, showed that backers of favourites were not without their chance. We have no account of how the running for the Two Thousand has affected betting on the Derby. Sunshine was the favourite at a point or two above Kingoraft before the Newmarket great three-year-old race was run, but the son of King Tom — a family never famous for their Btaying qualities— if unable to win a mile race on the heath, will scarcely carry Lord Falmouth's colours to the front over the Derby course. Sunshine, Macgregor, and Normanby probably stood at the head of the list, and the next telegram of news will inform us on whom the blue ribbon of the turf for the present year has fallen. The Oaks, run two days after the Derby, must have possessed great interest, as such a lot of fillies as those engaged this year, never probably met before. Whether Sunshine will start for the Oaks, ■will depend on the state she may be in aftei* running for the Derby, but Hester, Gainos, Mahonia, Atlantis, and Asterope, are all animals that have distinguished themselves. Frivolity, the winner of the One Thousand Guineas, was not engaged in the Oaks. The great steeplechase horse, The Colonel, was sold at auction for £2,600, to go to the Continent.

Maeayilla Cocoa. — Foe Breakfast. — The Globe says :—": — " Various importers and manufttefcers have attempted to attain a reputation for their prepared Cocoas, but we doubt whether any thorough success had been achieved until Messrs. Taylor Brothers discovered the extraordinary qualities of 'Maravilla' Cocoa. Adapting their perfect system of preparation to this finest of all species of the Theobroma, they have produced an article which supersedes every other Cocoa in the market. Entire solubility, a delicate aroma, and a rare concentration of the purest elements of nutrition, distinguish the Maravilla Cocoa above all others. For homoeopaths and invalids we could not recommend a more agreeable or valuable beverage." Sold in packets only by all Grocers, of whom also may be had Taylor Brothers' Original Homoeopathic Cocoa and Soluble Chocolate. Steam Mills— Brick Lane, London. 1435

Science and Act. — A striking instance of the immense value a small piece of steel may acquire by the great power of skilled mechanical labour is the balance-spring of a watch. From its extreme fineness and delicacy, 4,000 weigh not more than one ounce, and exceed in value £1,000. A most iutevesting little work, describing the vise and progress of watch-making, has been published by J. W. Benson, 25, Old Bond-street, and the City Steam Factory, 58, and GO, Ludgate-hill. The book, which is profusely illustrated, gives a full description of the various kinds of watches and clocks, with their prices. Mr. Benson (who holds the appointment to the Prince of Wales) has also published a pamphlet on Artistic Gold Jewelry, illustrated with the most beautiful designs of Bracelets, Brooches, Earrings, Lockets, &c, &c, suitable for Wedding, Birthday, and other presents. These pamphlets are sent post free for two stamps each, and they cannot be too strongly recommended to those contemplating a purchase, especially to residents in the country or abroad, who are thus enabled to select any article they may require, and have it forwarded with perfect safety. 267 Goldsmiths' Work. — The progress of fine art manufacture in this branch of trade is strikingly exemplified in a little work published by J. W. Benson, of 25, Old Bond Street, and of the City Steam Factory, 58, and 60, Ludgate-hill. It is enriched and embellished with designs (by Italian, French, and English Artistes) of Brooches, Bracelets, Earrings, and other articles, suitable for personal wear, or Wedding, Birthday, or other presents, with their prices. Mr. Benson (who holds the appointment to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales) has also published a very interesting pamphlet on the Eise and Progress of Watch and Clock-making. These pamphlets are sent post free for two stamps each, and they cannot be too strongly recommended to those contemplating a purchase, especially to residents in the country or abroad, who are thus enabled to select any article they may require, and have it forwarded with perfect safety. 967

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18700629.2.23

Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIX, Issue 52, 29 June 1870

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978

TURF NOTES. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIX, Issue 52, 29 June 1870

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