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SPORTING NOTES. THE TWO THOUSAND GUINEAS.

The race for tho Two Thousand Guineas, apart from its own intrinsic attraction of being tho first great three-year-old race of the season, has the additional interest of being supposed to furnish a key to the Derby — the race of the year. It is not always, of course, that a Two Thousand winner lands the Derby, but between 1863 and 1869 the double event was won four times, namely, by Macaroni, Gladiatcur, Lord Lyon, and Pretender ; and it has also often happened that the horses which were second in the Guineas attained the same position in the Derby. The horses which lately held the most prominent position in public favour for this race, wore Sunshine, Kingcraft, Astolfo, Sunlight, Camel, Stanley, Normanby, and Hawthornden ; but there were several dark horses of considerable pretentious, such as Bridgewater, Macgregor, Bay Ronald, Goldborough, and others, any one of which may upset all the speculations of backers of tried animals. Taking public running as a guide, Sunlight and Kingcraft are tho favourites. The performances of Mr. Merry's filly wore spoken of in tho " Notes " on tho One Thousand Guinea race ; but having two such horses as Sunlight and Macgregor in tho race, it is quite possible Mr. Merry may reserve hi 3 filly for something better. Sunlight, who is by Stockwell, is perhaps the finest three-year-old over seen on the turf, and last year, when tried at home, was invariably better than the filly Sunshine ; but in his first race, at Stockbridge, in the Coventry Stakes, being backward and green, the terrific race he ran, and the punishment he received, so cowed the colt, that although ho afterwards won three races, ho was never to be depended upon if pressed. If the colt has recovered heart, there is no horse, from his breeding and form, of greater promise ; but, on tho other hand, he may never bo worth his oats as a race-horso. Kingcraft is another horse of an uncertain character ; for although more successful than Sunlight last year, having won six races out of nine for which he started, he has a decided aversion to struggle home if called upon for an effort. Notwithstanding tho performances of the colt, and his truly brilliant speed, the fact of his being a son of King Tom prejudices many against him— that horse's stock being somewhat notorious for a great turn of speed, but wanting in pluck. Astolfo, a son of Orlando, is a horso of fine size, symmetry, and soundness. Ho ran but once last year, in the Chamberlayne Stakes, at Winchester, which he won in a canter. This horse is highly regarded by his stable. Bridgewater was the great gun of the dark horses, but the telegram by way of America speaks of Macgregor having taken a first position, but the reason for this we have yet to learn. Stanley is another colt of good promise, and John Day has half a dozen engaged in the race, all dark ; and although it is rumoured there is a clinker among them, his naino has not transpired. Sir Joseph Hawley has four, but the chances of none of them are thought much of, Asteroid being considered the best. In the season of 1867 Sir Joseph made little use of his great horse Beadsman, his stock not having then distinguished themselves as they have since done,andhe sent his best mares to other horses. There is nothing as far as is known very formidable from the other side of the Channel. Alaric, the best colt in the Gladiateur stable, although engaged in tho Derby, is not entered for tho Guineas. Tho best informed judges were divided in opinion between Mr. Merry's stable, Kingcraft, and Bridgewater, but the mail wo shall receive in a few hours may show changes not to be anticipated at this distance. Eques.

Billiards.— Largest Breaks on Record. — On February 26, W. Cook, the champion, played a match at the Corn Exchange, Aylesbury, with W. Dufton, the latter receiving 250 points out of 1,000. Cook won by 540 points, scoring his 1,000 points in tho remarkable space of one hour and forty minutes. Dufton's longest break was 52, but amongst the champion's score were the following : — 108, 81, 59, 95, 75, 140, and 417, including 137 spot strokes. — Brilliant as was his play on this occasion ho outdid himself in a match on March 4 with W. D. Stanley, of Bristol, at the Seymour Hotel, Totncs when he played tho largest break on record, scoring 512 before ho stopped, making 167 spots in succession, with the exception of one cannon intervening:. Stanley's total score was 574. Cook won by 426. Tho game occupied two hours and twenty minutes. — European Mail, March 25. Another Grand Match between the Champion and ex-Champion.— The fact that W. Cook, jun., and J. Roberts, sen., had not played together siuce tho memorable 11th of February, when Cook wrested the title of champion billiard player from John Roberts, sen., was in itself sufficient to fill Mr. Vickers's saloon, the Horso and Groom, Walworth, almost to Buflbcntion on March 16, standing room only being available soon after tho commencement of the game. At 8.25 Roberts broke the balls by trying to screw in off the spot, but failing to score he let iii his opponent, who at once gave a sample of his execution by making 65 before breaking down. Roberts, however, was the first to compete the first 100, and at one time (after a fine break of 101 was 240 to 108 for Cook. Tho young champion, nothing daunted, quickly responded to this by breaks of 177 (41 spot ■strokes and 67, the latter being a grand specimen of all round play. When tho interval for refreshment took plnco Cook had just added a magnificent sum of 201, which comprised 48 consecutive spot strokes, and in which his precision in hazard striking, his wonderful delicacy of touch and knowledge of strength, were fully exemplified. On resuming play Roberts at one time lessened the great gap between himself and his opponent, but his efforts wore all in vain, as Cook at 11.40 had scored his 1,000, and went out with an unfinished break, tho winner by 215 points, Roberts scoring 755 only.— lb.

ENGLISH ITEMS. J [From the European Mail, March 25.] According to a recent estimate, the population of tho globe is 1,228,000,030 souls. Of this number 552,000,000 belong to the Mongoliaurace,36o,ooo,ooo to the Caucasian, 190,0C0,000 to tho Ethiopian, 176,000,000 to the Malay, and 1,000,000 to the IndoAmerican race. The annual mortality is over 33,000,000. A sum of nearly £500 which remained unexpended from the Highland Emigration Fund, ha 3 been transferred to the British and Colonial Society, " to be applied in aid of the immigration of entire families from tho Western Highlands and Scotland to a British colony ;" and any further repayments which may be received from the Colonies will bo appropi'iated in like manner. Great Britain is to be divided into nine great military commands, with fourteen districts within those commands, conterminous with them and with the counties, which will make this country one for all military purposes. The Inspectors of Reserve Forces have become inspectors on the general staff of the army, in order that they may be part of this general united military administration. There will be twice as many recruiting districts as before. Australian Beef and Mutton.— On Marcli 1, the first of a series of sales of Australian meat, which aro to take place on the first Tuesday in each month, took place at the Hop and Malt Exchange in South-wark-street, under the management of Mr Tallerman, who acted as auctioneer. Tho quantity of meat submitted was 100 tons, consisting chiefly of mutton, cured in carcase, liind-quarters, hams and rolls, packed in pure fat, which realized 3£d. to 6d. per lb. ; barrels of sheep's tongues, packed in pure fat, realized Bd.per lb. ; 1,000 smoked sheep's tongues realized Is. to Is. ld.per dozen, and 300 smoked ox tongues averaged from Is. Id. to Is. 2d. each ; 60 cases of mutton, in tins of 7lbs. each, fetched 6£d. per lb. The attendance of buyers was on the whole pretty numerous, and the auctioneer expressed himself perfectly satisfied with the experiment. New Mail Route via San Feancisco. — The scheme of establishing a mail route between England and Australia, via San Francisco, seems likely to be realized. It is said that tho port of departure in this country will bo Milford Haven, not Liverpool, and the place of arrival in America, Portland instead of New York. Tho prospectus of the " Anglo-Aus-tralian Company " is so liberal, and the advantages offered so numerous, that one is tempted to doubt whether such dreams can be realized. The company undertakes to employ vessels of such a tonnage as may accommodate 900 passengers ; fares are to be fixed at the unprecedently low rates of £60 firstclass, and £30 second, including rail, provisions, and other charges ; and in the third place only £1,000 per voyage is asked as a subsidy. Tho company binds itself to perform each voyage in forty days, under penalty of £50 per diem, with a stipulation that it shall receive tho same sum as premium for every day gained upon this time. The Colonial Conference. — One important batch of answers to the circular despatched which emanated some months ago from the Colonial Office was received some time since, and another instalment of replies has lately been received, in a tone precisely similar. The Times remarks upon them : — " This latest manifestation of colonial sentiment on tho momentus questions of the connection between the mother country and her outlying dependencies includes despatches from the Governor of New Zealand and tho Governor of Queensland. The inoro important Austrslian colonies had already signified their disinclination to take part in any general council of colonists to be held in London, and the present declarations of opinion powerfully sustain the policy of Lord Grauville. The Governors of New Zealand and of Queensland prudently abstain from expressing any opinion of their own on the points supposed to be at issue between the mother country and her colonies. They merely convey to the Colonial Oflice the result of tho deliberations which became necessary in the Cabinets of New Zealand and of Queensland on the receipt of Lord Granville's circular. Nothing could be more emphatic than the answer which Mr. Fox, the Premier of New Zealand, sends back through the Colonial Office to the well-intentioned but 6hort-sighted persons who attempted to organise a colonial cabal in Caunon-strcet. We really feel a certain sympathy for Mr. Youl, Mr. Sewell, and their colleagues while we read Mr. Fox's interpretation of ' the idea which seems to have animated tho promoters of this Conference, that tho time has arrived to prepare tho way for national independence and absolute political separation on the part of the colonies from the Imperial Government.' We can conceive nothing more painful to the enthusiastic defenders of colonial nationality, who used to make the Cannon-street Hotel ring with their denunciations of the Colonial Secretary, than the implied charge that they were preparing the way for absolute political separation from England. It is a pregnant instance of that ingratitude which generally follows unauthorised interference; and we trust tho distinguished colonists who have done their best to make a party question in this country of the colonial grievance, will learn a lesson of moderation and self-constraint from the Government of New Zealand." Services in New Zealand.— ln the House of Commons, March 17, Mr. Porfnian asked the First Lord of the Admiralty when the medal which had already been issued to the army for services in New Zealand was to be issued to tho naval officers and sailors who took part in those services. — Mr. Childers promised to expedite the issue of the medal. New Zealand War Medal. — Col. T. L. J. Gallway, Commandant of the School of Military Engineering at Chatham, on March 5, at a full-dress parade of the Corps of Royal Engineers at Brompton barracks, presented the New Zealand war medal to the following members of the corps : — Major Frederick Mould, in command of the 40th Company ; Corporal Emms, 38th ; Corporal Mant, 35th ; Corporal Johnstone, 37th ; Lance-Corporal Smith, 22nd ; Sapper Graham, 38th; and Sapper Heron, 36th. "Pakeha," in the Broad Arrow, asks why the Military Train has not received the New Zealand Medal at the same time as the other corps ? As the corps is about to be disbanded, if it is not issued at once, there are some deserving soldiers who will not have an opportunity of wearing this decoration on the uniform in which they so nobly earned it.

Breakfast. — A Successful Experiment. — The Civil Service Gazette has the followiug interesting remarks : — " There fire very few simple articles of food which can boast so many valuable and important dietary properties as cocoa. While acting on the nerves as a gentle stimulant, it provides the body with some of the purest elements of nutrition, and at the same time corrects and invigorates the action of the digestive organs. These beneficial effects depend in a great measure upon the manner of its pieparation, but of late years such close attention has been given to the growth and treatment of cocoa, that there is no difficulty in securing it with every useful quality fully developed. The singulnr successs which Mr. Epps attained by his homoeopathic preparation of cocoa has never been surpassed by any experimentalist;. Far and wide the reputation of Epps's Cocoa has spread by the simple force of its own extraordinary merits. Medical men of all shades of opinion have agreed in recommending it as the safest and most beneficial article of diet for persons of weak constitutions. This superiority of a particular mode of preparation over all others is a remarkable proof of the great results to be obtained from little causes. By a thorough knowledge of the natural laws which govern tho operations of digestion and nutrition, and by a careful application of tho fine properties of well-selected cocoa, Mr. Epps has provided our breakfast tables with a delicately-flavoured beverage which may save us many heavy doctors' bills. It is by the judicious use of such articles of diet that a constitution may be gradually built up until strong enough to resist every tendencj 7 to disease. Hundreds of subtlo maladies are floating around us ready to attack wherever there is a weak point. We may escape many a fatal shaft by keeping ourselves well fortified with pure blood and a properlyuouvished frame." 218

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SPORTING NOTES. THE TWO THOUSAND GUINEAS., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIX, Issue 43, 28 May 1870

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2,434

SPORTING NOTES. THE TWO THOUSAND GUINEAS. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIX, Issue 43, 28 May 1870

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