Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

News of the Day.

The New Rush near West Wanganui.— But little more is known of the new gold-field below West Wanganui, as none of the parties who left Nelson early in the week for the ground have yefc returned. We have been informed that three or four good claims had been struck, which yield rough gold, but wo have no precise information concerning the probable extent of payable ground. The steamer Lyttelton, on her way from Westporfc, on Thursday morning, saw two vessels lying off the river leading to the new gold-field, apparently waiting for the •weather to moderate before attempting to cross the bar, the wind blowing at the timo half a gale from the Bouth-east. As the wind moderated shortly afterwards, we may soon expect to see these vessels back, when we shall obtain, we hope, information of a reliable character. COLLINGWOOD Coal-Field. — The company established some time ago to work the coal in the Aorere Valley, a short distance abovo Collingwood, are getting on remarkably well with the road to the mine, upon which the outlay, preparatory to working the coal, is chiefly required. We hope before long to be able to report the completion of tho work, and shipment of coal to Nelson. Coal in tiie Uppee Btjllbb Valley. — A good sample of coal may be seen in the Superintendent's office, obtained from the Upper Buller. A coal-field opened anywhere near the water-shed of that portion of the province, would be a valuable item in the consideration of the proposed railway, which could be constructed so that loaded trucks, by mere force of gravitation, would run into Nelson with very little assistance from steam power, and thus the carriage be reduced to almost a nominal cost. Mr. Gkobge Cotterelt/8 Entertainment. — Mr. G. Cottereli's entertainment, given at Spring Grove, on Tuesday evening last, was well attended, and tho performance afforded the greatest possible satisfaction. Mr. Cotterell evidently improves by practice, and we anticipate for him a highly successful career. The May Wool Sales.— lt is Btated in the wool ciroular of the " New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agenoy Company," May 21, that the only descriptions of wool which form any exception to the reduction at the recent sales otherwise generally established, are good combing half-breeds,' the competition for which by the Bradford buyers was keen at about the same quotations which were current in the earlier part of the year, and a considerable proportion of the shipments from the> ports of the Northern Island which fall within that category enjoyed the full benefit of this domand. The Convict Trioker.— Tho case of the unfortunate man Tricker who was some years ago convicted at Wellington of the murder of a country settler, chiefly on the evidenco of a half-caste, has beon warmly espoused by several gentlemen who havo kept it constantly before the public. A committoe, lYely appointed to inquire into the matter, have, reported that, according to the evidence, they consider -in alibi was proved, and the half-canto, on whose ovidence the unfortunato man was condemned, must have beon guilty of perjury. It is now intended to proseoute the half-caste for this offence, and thoro is a prospect of poor Tricker having justice done him at last. Wellington Gold-Fieu).— The last mail from Wellington informed us that about 100 men were at work for gold in a gully about four miles from the city of Wellington. The returns, it is true, were not very large, but tho "colour" was there, and, encouraged by this, the diggers were working manfully, in hopes that payable grouud might be found. A few men wevo also at work at Terawiti, and in some other place, but wo fear their labour has not yet received any great reward. A Caution to Militiamen. — At Grey town, Wairavupa, on the 18th instant, no fewer than eighteen men of tho Carterton Militia company were summoned beforo Mr. Wardell, charged with being absent from parade without leave. Captain Boyß proiecuted under tho Articles of War and Mutiny Act. Similar defence was made by each that they had received no verbal notice of when tho drill was to take place, and hnd not seen the written notices that that hud been posted. They had also understood from tho advertisement in the Mercury that the time and places of tlrili would be printed therein. Judgment deferred to the 15th instant.

Winter Evening Lectures. — The fifth of this series of lectures was delivered last evening in the Provincial Hall, by Dr. Irvine, the Bubject being " Elementary Chemistry." Although tho Hall was very full, the greatest attention was paid to the lecture throughout, and it was certainly deserving of -uch attention, the experiments being all most satisfactorily conducted. It is, however, to be regretted that bo great a body of light should havo existed in the hall, because its effect was to prevent all beyond the immediate precinct of the lecturer from seeing the effect of many of his experiments. Eoltpse op the Moon. — A partial eclipse of the Moon occurred last night, which was plainly visible between the hours of twelve and three o'clock, that being about tho time of the first aud last contact with the Earth's shadow. The first contact with the penumbra took place about 10"53, p.m., and the last contact with the pennmbra at 418 this morning. The middle of the eclipse occurred at about half-past one, a.m., at which time a little more than half the Moon's disc was obscured. The night was beautifully clear, and afforded observers an excellent opportunity of gratifying their desire of witnessing this the only eclipse of tho year visible in New Zealand. Tito Kowartt. — The latest particulars of the whereabouts of Tito Kowaru are thus given in a late Independent : — Wo learn that Tito Kowaru is at Mongngaio, with about 100 followers. Such is the purport of a message from Topia to his friends at Putiki. Testimonial to the Hon. W. Gisborne. — The clerks in the various departments of the Government service, in Wellington, have resolved to present the Hon. W. Gisborne, on tho occasion of his retirement from the Civil Service, with an address, accompanied by some suitable testimonial, as a mark of the respect and esteem in which he is held by the members of the Civil Service generally. The testimonial is intended to express the appreciation felt by officers of tho Civil Service, of the universal courtesy and kind feoling he displayed towards those who, in whatever position in the service, were brought into contact with him. In order, therefore, that the gift may represent as large a number as possible of the officers of the service, and that all who are desirous may have an opportunity of joining in the proposal, circulars have been sent to the different provinces, requesting that those who wish to do so will forward their names, and remit their subscription, to the chief postmaster in their district. What House has Won the Derby ? — Although tho Derby was ran for only n few days after the departure of the last mail, and the result, doubtless, telegraphed, yet singular to say this important piece of information was omitted from the telegram forwarded from Grey mou lh when the Rangitoto arrived there, nor has it been noticed, as far as we havo seen, in the Wellington papers, which must have received copies of the Melbourne papers containing the telegrams. The race was supposed to lie between Mr. Merry's Belladrum, Sir Joseph Hawley's Pero Gomez, and Mr. Johnstono's Pretender. Belladium and Pero Gomez were first favourites during all the winter, with scarce a point between them, the Duke of Hamilton's Wild Oats standing third. Early in the year, however, a story got into circulation, that Belladrum was a roarer, and he in consequence receded greatly in tho betting, and, in tho slang of the turf, was peppered (betted against) unmercifully by tho ring. So far wos he regarded as being virtually out of tho field, that heavy bets were laid against his running for the Two Thousand Guineas, the first of his three-year-old engagements ; and when he came to the post at Nowmarket, he was only fifth favourite, Duko of Beaufort being first at 3 to 1. Pero Gomez was not in the Two Thousand, and Wild Oats had broken clown, so that Belladrum must have declined very much in public esteem to rank so far below horses that could not run with him as a two-year-old. The race for the Two Thousand was a narrow thing, and would havo been won by Belladrum could his jockey have held him back, as the horso lias an extraordinary turn of speed. But the colt made a good deal of the running, and was beaten by balf-a-length by Pretender, no other horses in the race having a chance. But now for the Derby, ran a month later. Did Belladrum, with a better jockey on his back, turn tho tables on Pretender ; or, were both beaten by tho son of Beadsman ; or were all ! three favourites defeated by an outsider ? This is what all sporting men are asking, and what wo ought to have known eleven days ago, had not the person who telegraphed the English news from Greymouth been a Goth, who cared for none of these things. Horses tor the Governor-General of India. — A handsome compliment has been paid to the stud owners of New South Wales by Earl Mayo, Go-vernor-General of India, by selecting this market for a supply of carriage horses for his establishment. Tho order was entrusted to Mr. Buchan Thomson, ' who has now at the stables, preparatory for shipment to Calcutta per Forl'arshire, six splendid bays, which cannot fail to enhance tho character of Australian horses in the Indian market. The stock selected aro in Bplendid condition, very evenly matched in colour and size, with plenty of bone and breeding, being the produce of Potentate and Bottler from mares equally thoroughbred, the progeny of old Hector, Steeltrup, Waverley, and Gratis. It is to be hoped that the shipment will reach their destination in something like their present form ; if so, they will do credit to all concerned. Partridges. — The Lyttelton Times says :—": — " We are glad to learn that the Rev. A. P. O'Callagban, and Mr. Wood, of Eyreton, have recently imported five brace of partridges, which they have turned out at Eyreton, on Messrs. Hillyard and Wood's farm. Wo hope to hear that this spirited enterprise has succeeded, and trust that the residents in tho district will do all they can to assist in tho preservation and propagation of the birds." ! Thames Gold-Field. — The Thames Adzertiser j says : — (< In roferring to the great excitement and speculation which at present exists in Auckland with respect to shares in claims on this gold-field, it is more necessary for us to speak words of caution than add fuel to the flame. It is quite true that the returns from some of tho claims lately havo been such that the soberest heads are apt to be turned by tho immense wealth gained by those who purchased shares only a few months ago at trifling sums. We need only refer to our battery returns for somo time past in proof of the fairly astounding wealth of the Thames — a wealth undreamed of by the most sanguino for long after the gold-field had been opened. Over a large part of the field — by far the larger part — the claims have not really been opened out, and we fully expect that many of these will yet rank as high as those now famous. But, notwithstanding this, we would rather see a quiet and steady progress — the country being opened up, the tramway and other works being pushed forward, and machinery being erected — than the exciting gambling in scrip that is now going on in Auckland, which will tend, if carried too far, to do harm to the field. And we must confess that we look with some alarm at what is going on, and what seems to be coming. In somo of the claims now selling at high prices scarcely any work has been done, the ideas as to their value being derived from their proximity to claims that have attained a name. Now, we know almost nothing of the leads of gold, and are not justified in assuming that in even the most favourably situated spot masses of gold will be got. We can safely say for ourselves, that although as it were identified with tho field, wo have not hitherto exaggerated or overstated the facts which show forth its wonderful nnd unparalleled wealth, but have always tried 1 to keep on the safe side — dealing as much as possible in figures, but not of speech. It is not easy, perhaps, when, as in the case of the Long Drive, quantities of stone, consisting half of gold, are taken out, to restrain wild speculation. Still, we would advise caution, in the best interests of the field itself."

Two great public works, in London, are approaching completion. The Holborn-valley Viaduct is in a state of progress which permits tho City Corporation to arrange for its opening, and the ceremony is appointed to take place in the month of July. The new Bridge, at Blaokfriars, is also to be opened in June or July,

New Zealand Flax. — The Independent, of Saturday last says : — '' Wo have been favoured by Messrs. Ki'ull and Co., with the following report upon the phonnmm tenax, extracted from Devitt and Hett's monthly circular : — ' Shippers have at last summoned up courage to send homo parcels of a sufßcient size to attract the attention of buyers, 1,400 bales having arrived during the last week or two. Of these GOO bales have been offored at auction, and about onothird sold, viz. : Ist quality, dressed, £37 to £38 10s. ; 2nd quality, only part sold, at £35 ; the rough undressed is very little sought after at £24 to £27. In making further shipments of this article, we would recommend a regular supply of well dressed ; tho partially dressed is very objectionable to the trade. We would rather see it sent home in the straw without any expense occurred in the colony. We regret to observe in the parcels just to hand, that the naturally strong fibre has been much weakened in the dressing; this should be carefully avoided, as the great end to be obtained is a successful competition with Manilla hemp, which realizes £4-8 per ton." Cholera in Sydney.— The Herald, of the 24th ultimo, had the following :—": — " We are informed that a case of virulent cholera has occurred in Sydney, which baffled tho most strenuous efforts for recovery, and terminated fatally in twenty-four hours fr6m tho seizure. The patient was a young man about twenty-five years of age, ana on Monday, tho 21st, at four, a.m., was affected Avith violent vomiting, purging, and cramps, to which succeoded a deadly i collapse, with blueness of the surface of the body. The patient was seen by Dr. Miller, of Phillip-street, about eleven, a.m., and at two, p.m., he advised a consultation, when Dr. Bell was sent for. About five, p.m., somo slight reaction set in, which gave somo hopes of a recovery ; but on a further consultation at eight, p.m., the symptoms of collapse appeared as bad as ever, and though everything was clone as far as medical treatment and good care and nursing were concerned, death took place on Tuesday morning. Dr. Bell states that, since the years 18323, when he was actively engaged with cholera cases in Ireland, he has never since seen any case approaching, or being identical with, Asiatic malignant cholera as this late case has been." An Uninvited Visitor.— Tho Boolong correspondent of the Illawarra Mercury is responsible for the following story :—": — " The other night, as people were enjoying their tea, a bull, driven by Mr. Hector M'Pherson, took it into his head to visit. Mr. T. Beavers 1 , and, without any ceremony, walked into that gentleman's house, and, putting his head in at the door, surveyed the group round tho t.-tble. Mr. B. tried to drive him out, but, with a shake of his head, he forced his way into the children's bedroom, where ho very quietly made himself at home. Assistance was soon obtained, and tho neighbours came with axes, sliprails, and rope, to eject his bullship, prior to which fortifications had been erected, consisting of tables, chairs, and safes, in front of the other bedroom door, to prevent his paying a visit to Mrs. Beavers, who happened to be in bed through her accouchement. All being ready, some scalod the walls to the wall-plates and partition, and, by means of sundry pokes and hits, he was made to face an array of long poles a la bayonet, tho appearance of which so frightened him that he soon made tracks through the front door into the garden, from which he beat a hasty retreat, well belaboured with stock-, whips. Tho fright occasioned to Mrs. Beavers was at one time serious, but, by the good offices of neighbours, she soon recovered from the shock. No damage was done to anything, which was much to be surprised at, as, had he become in the least wayward, he was in a good position to prove how awkward, a thing a bull is in a bedroom, let alone in a china shop.' Illegal Traffic in Polynesia. — We have received the subjoined document from Fiji: — "Notice — The Acting-British Consul has again to direct the strict attention of British subjects residing in Fiji to tho Acts Greorge 4th, c. 113, and Victoria 6 and 7, c. 98, for tho abolition of the slave trado and for the suppression of any acts tending to promote or encourage 6aid trade. The Acts of Parliament can bo perused at this office. From information received at this office from persons worthy of credit, it appears the inhabitants of the Kingsmill Islands, generally known as the Pino Islands, have suffered injury, and in eomo cases death at the hands of somo persons unknown, sailing on board ships supposed to bo British. These outrages havo iuspired the said natives with feelings of revenge, rendering it dangerous for ships engaged in legitimate pursuits to touch at the aboveinentioned islands. The alleged outrages at Tanna Islands, New Hebrides, is a matter of notoriety. British subjects are, therefore, advised and cautioned not to embark in any trade or traffic which might implicate them in said charges, or in any act, matter, or thing which might be construed into a criminal offence. The Acting Consul especially desires to impress upon all Biitish subjects within tho limit of his jurisdiction the, following :—: — * That any British subject who may loan or advance, either ships, money, goods, or efiects generally, in order to prosecute any trade or traffic contrary to British law, in a name or nationality other than their own or British, do in no way void their responsibility, but are liable to forfeit, and pay for every such offence double the value of all money, goods, or effects by them advanced, loaned, or secured.' — (Signed) J. B. Thueston, Acting British Consul. British Consulate, Fiji, sth March, 1869."

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18690724.2.10

Bibliographic details

News of the Day., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXVIII, Issue 59, 24 July 1869

Word Count
3,209

News of the Day. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXVIII, Issue 59, 24 July 1869

Working