Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE.

[From the late English papers.] The Queen has conferred the vacant Blue Ribbon of the Garter upon Earl Cowper ; her Majesty has also been pleased to grant the vacant Green Ribbon of the Thistle to Earl Star. The ex-Queen of the Sandwich Islands, Emma, widow of King Kahiehameha, has come on a visit to her Majeaty. Queen Emma was conveyed from Honolulu to Panama in the British war steamer Clio, accompanied by the Bishop of Honolulu and the British commissioner, W. F. Synge (by order of Queen Victoria). Her suite consists of the honourable C. J. Hopkins, late Minister of the Interior ; Miss Chambers, and Mrs. Kopelli, companions to the queen ; the Rev. Mr. Kopelli, chaplain to her majesty ; Mr. Welch, confidential attendant ; besides two native children, named Polemo and Kealaka, whom Queen Emma has brought over with her for the purpose of having educated in this country. Tho " Edmunds Scandal," as it was termed, is not yet over. It is stated that Mr. Leonard Edmunds has filed a bill in tho Court of Chancery against Lord Brougham and his brother William Brougham, to get back the money paid for them, as he alleges, since the year 1833. On the Ist of July a provision in the new act to amend the law of evidence and practice in criminal trials took effect, and forms an important feature in all criminal cases. In every trial for felony or misdemeanour commenced on or after the Ist July, the presiding judge, at the close of the case for the prosecution, is to a3k the counsel for each prisoner or defendant defended by counsel, but not otherwise, whether it is intended to give evidence ; and if no evidence is to be given, then the counsel for the prosecution is to "sum up" the evidence adduced. In every trial for felony or misdemeanour, whether the prisoners or defendants are defended by counsel or not, each one may open his case ; and, after the evidenco given, " sum up" the evidence respectively ; and the right of reply and practice, and course of proceedings, save as now altered, to be the same as at present. The object of the new act is to make the law in criminal matters more nearly assimilate with cases at common law. It is rumoured there will shortly be important legal changes. Chief Baron Pollock is eighty two years of age, and it has been known for some time past that he would resign his scat if a Conservative Government were in office. But as the result of the general election renders the return of the Conservatives for some years to come very improbable, it is believed that ho has now at last determined to vacate the post which he has so long and worthily filled. It is also said that Baron Martin, his son-in-law, who is sixty-three years of age, will retire, and that the two Chief Justices, Cockburn and Erie, will be raised to the peerage, in order to give strength, which is Borely needed, to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council and the Court of Appeal. Should these rumours prove true, two new judges will have to be appointed. Resignation of the Loeb Chancelloe. — Lord "Westbury on announcing his resignation in the House of Lords, thus addressed the House : — " My lords, the step which I took yesterday I should have taken several months ago if I had followed the dictates of my own judgment, and acted on my own views alone. But I felt that I was not at liberty to do so. As a member of the Government I could not take such a step without the permission and sanction of the Government. As far as I was myself concerned, possessing, as I had the happiness to do, the friendship of the noble lord at the head of the Government, and of the members of the Cabinet, I laid aside mj own feelings, being satisfied that my honour and my sense of duty would be safe if I followed their opinion rather than my own. My lords, I believe that the holder of the Great Seal ought never to be in the position of an accused person, and such, unfortunately, being the case, for my own part, I felt it due to the great office that I hold that I should retire from it and meet any accusation in the character of a private person. But my noble friend at the head of the G-overnment combated that view, and I think with great justice. He said it would not do to admit this a principle of political conduct, for the consequence would be that whoever brought up an accusation would at once succeed in driving the Lord Chancellor • from office. [Tho resignation, his lordship said, was tendered when the charges were first raised in regard to the Edmunds case ; again, when the committee of the Commons was appointed on the Leeds case ; and for the third time, when notice was given of the late motion in the House of Commons ; but on each occasion the Premier advised him to persevere]. Let it not be for one moment supposed that I say this in order to set up my own opinion in opposition to the kind feeling which I experienced, and the judicious advice which I received, coming from one whom I was bound to respect, and to whose authority I feel called upon to defer. I have made this statement, my lords, Bimply in the hope that you will believe, and that the public will believe, that I have not clung to office, much less that I have been influenced by any baser or more unworthy motive. With regard to the opinion which the House of Commons has pronounced Ido not presume to say a word. lam bound to accept the decision. I may, however, express the hope that after an interval of time calmer thoughts will prevail and a more favourable view be taken of my conduct. I am thankful for the opportunity with which my tenure of office has afforded me to propose and pass measures which have received your lordships' approbation, and which I believe, nay, I will venture from experience to predict, will be productive of great benefit to the country. With these measures I hope my name will be associated. I regret deeply that a great measure which I had at heart — I refer to the formation of a digest of the whole law — I have been unable to inaugurate; for it was not until this session that the means were afforded by Parliament for that purpose. That great scheme, my lords, I bequeath already prepared to the hands of my successor. As to the future, I can only venture to promise that it will be my anxious endeavour, in the character of a private member of your lordships' House, to promote and assist in the accomplishment of all those reforms and improvements in the administration of justice which will I feel yet remain to be carried out. The appellate jurisdiction of your lordships' House is left in a state which will I think be found to be satisfactory. There will not be at the close of the session a single judgment in arrear, save one in which the arguments, after occupying several days, were brought to a conclusion only yesterday. In the Court of Chancery I am glad to be able to inform your lordships I do not think there will remain at the end of this week one appeal unheard or one judgment undelivered. I mention these things simply to show that it has been my earnest desire from the moment I assumed the seals of office to devote all the energies I possessed, and all the industry of which I was capable to the public service. My lords, it only remains for me to thank you, which I do most sincerely, for the kindness which I have uniformly received at your hands. It is very possible that by some word inadvertently used — some abruptness of manner — I may* have given pain or exposed myself to your unfavourable opinion. If that be so, I beg of you to accept the sincere expression of my regret, while I indulge in the hope that the circumstance may be erased from your memories." Thus has terminated the Chancellorship of the most able man who has sat upon the woolsack since Bacon, and it is said the most unscrupulous. Mr. Gladstone has been defeated at Oxford by a majority of 180, and Mr. Gathorne Hardy, with Sir W. Heathcote, are now therefore the unillustrious members for that illustrious University. Mr. Gladstone's defeat is believed by his committee to be less due to the rural clergy than the pressure of the Carlton Club exercised through the Tory squirearchy. Two magistrates are mentioned who refused to attest proxies for Mr. Gladstone, though to one of them a clergyman had walked a distance of some miles, and by his refusal was compelled to go up to vote in person. The squires have in some parts of the country used as much pressure to coerce their rectors or curates into a Tory vote, as Lord Leceiater used in Tain to his tenant-formers of East

Norfolk. Probably the clergy have less power of combination amongst themselves than the tenantfarmers, and in this case at least proved more manageable. Of the true University — the scholastic | body engaged in the actual business of teaching — Mr. Gladstone carried with him a very large majority iv numbers, and much larger in intellectual weight. Out of 260 or 270 residents, 155 voted or paired for Mr. Gladstone, and 89 for Mr. Hardy. At Balliol, the proportion for Mr. Gladstone was 10 to 1 ; at Oriel, 7to 1 ; and so on in a diminishing ratio, varying with the intellectual standing of the College. Even the Heads of Houses, — those centres of gravity at which all the heaviness of the University is collected, — gave a majority of one for Mr. Gladstone — 12 for him to 11 for Mr. Hardy. Of the thirty -four professors twenty -four were on his side, and only ten on his opponent's. Of the tutors and lecturers about sixty were for Mr. Gladstone, and twenty for Mr. Hardy. With such support as this there was less mortification to Mr. Gladstone in defeat than to Mr. Hardy in victory. Mr. G-ladstone's votes were gold where Mr. Hardy's were copper, and Mr. Hardy must become a democrat of almost a new type before he can measure the real value of his political money by the number of his com3. — Spectator. Mr. Disraeli made a great speech on his election for Buckinghamshire on Thursday, which was chiefly directed against Mr. Gladstone, and intended to prove that his finance was neither original nor peculiarly successful. He pointed out truly enough that the last year of Tory rule, 1858-9, was the last year of economical expenditure, but he forgot to explain that the Tory Government prepared all the estimates for the years 1859-60, and prepared them on the new scale of greatly increased expenditure, which the reconstruction of the navy rendered necesasry. It was no blame for them to have done so, but it is scarcely fail- dealing to represent that the Liberals inaugurated a change of policy which was due indeed to the country, but first initiated by a Tory administration. Mr. Disraeli stated that he had been entirely favourable to the French Treaty of Commerce, but, if so, the course of the leader of Opposition and the course of the whole Opposition upon it certainly gave a false impression to England at large. He states that the income-tax was never so low as under his administration in 1858 till this year, which is true ; but he forgets that he reduced it so low while other and more objectionable difficulties were high, and at the cost of renewing bonds which he ought strictly speaking to have paid off. In short Mr. Disraeli made a very clever special case for equality as a financier with Mr. Gladstone, but not one that anybody who has really studied the matter — not even his Conservative friend Sir Stafford Northcote — would admit. — Ib. The electors of Lambeth are doing a very publicspirited thing — raising a subscription to pay all the election expenses of their popular member, Mr. Hughes. Mr. Hughes has repeatedly asked for his election bills, but cannot get them from his committee. The reply is that it is their affair, not his, and that he will hear no more of the expenses of the election. The money will be chiefly raised, we believe, by a shilling subscription among the working men. The Handel Festival at the Crystal Palace this year has been a remarkable success, notwithstanding many untoward circumstances, such as the total absence of all patronage in the highest quarters, the elections, extremely bad railway management, and a deluge of rain on one of the four days. The accounts are not yet made up, but in round numbers it is believed the company will have received upwards of £5,000, and the Sacred Harmonic Society, £1,000. The Duke of Sutherland has entertained the firemen of the metropolis at Stafford-house. Several noblemen who, like his grace, take an interest in fireengines, were present, and the exertions of the Prince of Wales in helping to extinguish the fire at his own residence of Marlborough-house were, as might be expected, duly honoured. The enjoyments of the evening were a little marred by the breaking out of a fire in the Southwark-bridge-road, but by the pre-arrangements of Captain Shaw only a portion of the men were required to leave the hospitable board. The great Metropolitan Horse Show, at the Agri-cultural-hall, Islington, was opened on July 7. The show of horses was of the most splendid description, and embraced every variety in the equine race. There was a grand parade of the horses in the show, and amongst them the celebrated racehorses Lord Clifden, Caractacus, Scottish Chief, Diophantus, Idler, Rouge Dragon, the Hetman, &c. The Indian princes, now on a visit to this country, have taken a private box. The Royal box has also been most elegantly fitted for the Prince of Wales. The first prize for thoroughbred stallions was taken by Mr. S newing's Caractacus, the winner of the Derby, in 1862. Diophantus and Scottish Chief were next in order of merit. The first prize for hunters was taken by Lord Spencer's Brown Stout. A church-rate martyr was recently before the Birmingham Bankruptcy Court. The bankrupt was a grocer, and his name was Jones. Mr. Harris, who appeared for the bankrupt, stated that his failure was owing to a church-rate amounting to 16s. l£d. He was put forward by the rest of the community as champion of the opposition, and went to great expense, and was then left in the lurch. The churchwardens' costs, which the bankrupt had to pay, were taxed at £569, and the bankrupt's own expenses amounted to a much larger sum. The result was ruinous to the bankrupt, and he had no alternative but to come to the court. The caße waß adjourned for the completion of accounts. The bishops and clergy of Spain are furious against the Government for proposing to recognise the kingdom of Italy. Episcopal protest after protest pours in ; and there is even some wild talk of a reactionary movement in arms to compel the queen to retrace her steps. The health of the King of the Belgians is Baid to be such as to cause the greatest uneasiness. It is stated that all sorts of mental labour are strictly prohibited, and that he is unable to take an airing in his carriage. His chief disease is said to be hypertrophy of the heart. A destructn c fire has occurred in Moate, county Galway, by which the woollen manufactory of Messrs. T. and J. Clibborn was totally destroyed. Nearly 200 hands will be thrown out of employment by this unfortunate occurrence, but the premises were insured. The fire originated from one of the workmen haying placed a candle where it fell on some wool, in a loft, and owing, to the inflammable nature of the materials and the want of a fire-engine, nothing could be done to check the flames. Death fbom weaeing- Ceinoline. — An inquest was lately held at the Royal Free Hospital, upon the body of Mrs. Ann Piggott, one of four persons who were seriously burned through a fire arising from the distension of her dress by crinoline. Mr. James Rolf, an inspector on the Great Northern Railway, said :—": — " I live next door to the deceased. A few days ago I heard loud screams proceeding from her house, and, upon looking over the back garden palings, I saw her all in flames. Her light muslin dress was distended by a large crinoline, and she was on fire from head to foot. Her children were running about her, screaming. I jumped over the railings, and ran into the house, when I got a cocoa-nut mat, and threw it over her. That did not put out the flames, and the children brought me jackets and shawls to put over her, crying out ' Save her save her !' The deceased herself shrieked out, ' Save me ! For God's sake, do not let me die a death like this.' The children clung to me, asking me to save her, and I caught hold of her by the arms, and struggled with her, trying to throw her down. But in her agony she resisted, and the flesh came off her arms. The heat was very great, and my uniform was burnt, and I was so injured, that even now my chest and arms are covered with large blisters. The straw hat which I had on and my hair, were set on fire. Deceased said that, while she was seated at the fire, with her Bon in her arms, her dress became ignited at the grate. The child was much burnt, and had to be taken to the hospital with his mother. Everything on the deceased, except her stays, was consumed. Even the hoops were destroyed. As her daughter, a girl ten years of age, was passing her to go for assistance, 'her frock caught fire. Some persons extinguished it." The jury returned a verdict of " Accidental death."

The Rev. W. Jacobsen, D.D., has been nominated to the bishopric of Chester, vacant by the death of Dr. Graham. I A list has been published of subscriptions to the Cok-nso fund. They now amount to £2,800. Among the subscribers are DeauMilman, Dean Stanley, Dr. Temple, Lords Amberley and Belper, the Hons. E. Stanley and E. Twisleton, the Astronomer Royal, Mr. Babbage, Mr. Bovil, Sir John Bowring, Rajah Brooke, Mr. Darwin, Mr. Charles Dickens, Mr. Francis Galton, Mr. George Grote, Mr. W. H. Grove, f Mr. J. Hey wood, Dr. Hooker, Mr. Huxley, Sir Henry Keppel, Messrs. Godfrey and Vernon Lushington, Rev. J. Martineau, Mr. F. Newman, Rev. W. Rogers, of Bishopsgate, Mr. Samuel Sharpe, Admiral Smyth, Mr. Fitzjame9 Stephen, Sir J. Emerson Tenncnt, and tho following gentlemen who state their connection with Oxford or Cambridge, viz : — Rev. W. Berkeley (Trinity), Sir Benjamin Brodie (Balliol), Messrs. E. Card (Merton), D. Crawford (Lincoln), A. V. Harcourt (Christ Church), G. Miller (Exeter), J. Morrison (Lincoln), F. Otter (Corpus), W. Pater (Brasenose), J. S. Phillpots (New), A. Watson (Brasenose), and R. S. Wright (Oriel), of Oxford ; the Rev. F. Farrar (Trinity), Dr. Liveing, Rev. G. Skinner, Messi's. L. Courtney (St. John's), J. L. Hammond (Trinity), J. D. Lewis (Trinity), and Mr. J. Westlake (Trinity), of Cambridge. The news of a terrible disaster has been received at Brest. Tho Transatlantic Mail Company's steamer Lafayette arrived there recently from New York, bringing forty-four persons who had been picked up at sea, and they stated that they were a portion of about 450 emigrants, who had sailed from Antwerp on board the William Nelson, on voyage for New York, but that the ship took fire at sea, and they feared that all the rest of the passengers and crew had perished. Americans are visiting Europe this year in unprecedented numbers ; and though there are seven trading steam-ship lines, which will shortly, it is said, give the New Yorkers two boats a day each way, the vessels still seem to be crowded. The seven lines referred to are owned entirely by European companies. A Stockholm letter announces that the town of Carlstad, capital of the province of Weruseland, has been almost entirely destroyed by fire. It consisted of 60 ' houses, and 4,600 inhabitants, and all that remains is tho hospital, the prison, and the bishop's residence. A steamer, loaded with provisions and clothing, was immediately despatched from Stockholm. The American papers complain of a lack of women in the new mining territories of the Far West. Nearly the entire population of Nevada and Colorado are of the male sex, and now that they have got houses and cities, and wealth of silver and gold, they are anxious beyond measure for the society and help of women. Neither wives nor servants can be had, though both have unequalled opportunities. The Rocky Mountain News is very plaintive on the subject, and is also practical. It declares that women will find in that country the " Utopia of their dreams." If husbands are desired, they can be had at leisure ; and if women wish to engage in household employment, they can quickly acquire a fortune. The men out there, moreover, are not only rich, but the editor assures us are otherwise desirable, and he proceeds to enlarge upon their virtues. The King of Prussia has, we think, at last violated the Constitution in form as well as spirit. By a Royal decree, dated the 19fch instant, he orders that the estimate rejected by the Diet shall serve as a regulation for the administration of the finances for the year — which is, we believe, legal, provided the expenditure is within the taxes voted when the Parliament was free. But he also assigns a sum of £75,000 for the construction of heavy cast-steel guns for the fleet — a new expenditure which requires Parliamentary sanction. This indeed must be the intention of the order, as had the King intended to pay the money out of the naval budget, he would have done so without the formality of a decree. His Ministers have also violated the Constitution on another point. It concedes the right of meeting, yet they have prohibited a Liberal banquet to be given at Cologne, which the Liberals, for once sure of their constitutional ground, have, nevertheless, determined to hold. A similar blunder cost Louis Phillippe his throne, but then the Prussians are not Frenchmen. — Spectator. There is a fearful locust plague in Syria. " The locusts have no king, yet go they forth all of them by bands," and they have descended upon the plain of Esdraelon and the neighbouring country, consuming everything near Jaffa, Nazareth, and throughout Galilee apparently, as a regular army, with pickets thrown forward, main body and rearguard. The Rev. J. Zeller, the missionary at Nazareth, gives a striking account of their advance on the nursery gardens round that beautiful village. The whole population turned out to resist them, and kept off the advanced-guard by immense fires round the vineyards, but when the body of the army came up every effort failed — they fell like a flood upon the land, and not for many hours longer was it possible even to keep them out of the houses by shutting every window and door. Every time a door opened to admit or let out anyone, in rushed locusts like a draught of air, and at last they gave it up, and let the rooms swarm with them as did the outer country. Every green leaf is eaten up, milk and oil destroyed, and the only remaining provisions were corn and meat, which were very dear. The words of Exodus are once move literally fulfilled : — " I will bring the locusts unto thy coast : and they shall cover the face of the earth, that one cannot be able to see the earth : and they shall eat the residue of that which is escaped, which remaineth unto you from the hail, and shall eat every tree which groweth for you out of the field : and they shall fill thy houses, and the houses of all thy servants." Beigandage in Rome. — At broad noon one day recently, eight individuals, armed with guns and pistols, stopped near Nunziatella Station ; the stagecoach coming from Civita Vecchia, they fired at the horses, two of which remained wounded. The passengers were ready to give up their valuables, when a corporal of the Customs, Mazetti Gaetano, of Vicenza, jumped from the stage-coach, fired at a robber and wounded him, then loaded his rifle and fired at two others, without being hurt by their shots. During the fight the horses carried away the coach, which was saved by Mazetti's bravery, who alone put to flight the whole band. AMERICA. Advices from all parts of the South represent the condition of the freedmen to be deplorable. Even those who are willing to work find difficulty in getting remunerative employment, and thousands are falling into a condition of vagabondage or adopting lawless pursuits. In the cities and large towns, to which the negroes flock from the rural districts, the white inhabitants have, in self-preservation, been compelled in many places to drive out the intruders in order to avoid a famine. The Macon Telegraph states that the citizens had driven a great number of negroes out of that place, and had warned them not to return. Public meetings were being held in other cities with a view of securing a general expulsion of negroes from the large towns, where their idleness and lawless conduct has developed a condition of affairs said to be positively insufferable. Home guards for the protection of exposed houses and other property are being organized, and numbers of negroes are being punished for theft, rape, arson, and other crimes. The question of granting franchise to the negro is still vigorously agitated, although, of course, no positive action in the matter can be taken until Congress meets. Several anti-slave conventions have recently been held, and the right of the negro to vote warmly advocated. Throughout the North generally contests between the blacks and whites are of daily "occurrence. Southern advices furnish further confirmation of previous reports as to the terrible ravages of the war in that section. No special efforts have as yet been made by the inhabitants to repair the damage done. Some of the railroads are being partially restored, but the absence of home capital, and the small inducements offered for the investment of Northern ' capital, leaves the work of recuperation in tempoIrary abeyance. It is understood, however, that

when civil law is once more thoroughly reestablished, and the question of ownership of property finally settled, large numbers of Northern capitalists stand ready to invest in the re-establish-ment of Southern railroads, steam-bo.it lines, and local enterprises. The Richmond Republican estimates the total losses of the South by the war at over 5,000,000,000 dollars, distributed 'as follows :— Value of slaves emancipated, 2,400,000,000 dollars ; by direct ravages of war, in Georgia, 100,000,000 dollars ; in South Carolina, 100,000,000 dollars ; in North Carolina, 75,000,000 dollars; in Virginia, during the four years, 250,000,000 dollars ; in Tennessee and Missouri, each 75,000,000 dollars; in Kentucky, Arkansas, and Alabama, each 30,000,000 dollars ; the loss on four cotton crops, 1,000,000,000 dollars; four tobacco and rice crops, 200,000,000 dollars ; responsibility iv national war debt, in gold, 500,000,000 dollars. The last seaport held by the Confederates, Galveston in Texas, was surrendered to General E. J. Davis, by Kirby Smith, on the sth June. In consequence, the President has issued a proclamation raising the blockade established by Mr. Lincoln in 1861, and notifying that all ports west of the Mississippi will be opened on the Ist July to foreign and domestic commerce, upon tho terms of his proclamation of the 22nd May last. Mr. John Mitchel, one of the editors of the New York Daily Neios, and recently one of the Richmond papers, was arrested on June 14, and sent to Fortress Monroe. The public were first informed'of the fact by two large placards in front of the News office, on which was printed the announcement that John Mitchel had been arrested by military power and can'ied off. Naturally, among his friends, this summai^y proceeding caused con-iderable surprise, and more alarm. Neither surprise nor alarm were, however, of the least avail. Mr. Mitchel' s career was suddenly ended. It was believed that Mr. Mitchel was held to answer for giving aid and comfort to the enemies of the United States, especially in regard to the treatment of the Federal prisoners. On the 7th July, in accordance with the findings and sentence of the military commission, approved by President Johnson, four of the alleged assassins of the late President of the United States — namely, Harold, the companion of Booth, the actual murderer ; Payne, who attempted the murder of Mr. Seward ; the German Atzerott, who sought to slay the then Vice-President of the United States, now the President, Mr. Johnson ; and the woman Surratt — were hanged at Washington. Three others of the gang, viz., Arnold, O'Loughlin, and Mudd (the medical man who " doctored " Booth and provided him with crutches), have been condemned to imprisonment for life ; and the eighth, Spangler, the stage carpenter of the theatre in which Mr. Lincoln was so foully murdered, and who cleared the stage to facilitate the escape of Booth, has been sentenced to six years in the Penitentiary. PRANCE. The Buonaparte quarrel may now be considered at an end. Prince Napoleon, after having two interviews with the Emperor, has gone to Havre, and the Prefect of Corsica, who had been summoned to Paris to give an account of his proceedings at the time of the Ajaccio speech, has obtained the full approval of the Emperor for his conduct on the occasion. It is reported in Paris that there is to be a reduction of the French army by about 30,000 men, a proceeding which will relieve the exchequer to the amount of thirty million francs, besides affording an additional evidence of the pacific tendency of the French Government. Marshal Macmahon has arrived in Paris. ITALY. Signor Vegezzi has returned to Florence after his bootless Roman mission. It is still, however, asserted in some quarters that the negotiations between the Italian government and the Papacy are not definitively broken off, but that they will be renewed sooner or later ; perhaps after some modifications have taken place in the Florence cabinet. Meanwhile, popular dislike to all negotiation with Rome continues to find expression in public meetings in various parts of Italy. The Opinione, of Florence, the journal which represents the views of the Government, sets forth in an article the result of the negotiations with the Pope. It appears that the Pope rejects the condition which would require the oath of allegiance to the King to be taken by the Bishops, but he consents to order the latter to yield obedience to the laws and the State. The Pope and the Government have come to an understanding in refer-ence-to the return to their sees of Bishops whose presence would in no wise compromise public tranquillity. So far, therefore, the return of those prelates is the only distinct result of the negotiations. But the Opinione holds out a sort of vague hope that the negotiations, now broken off, may be resumed as soon as circumstances and the policy of the two parties render a renewal of them expedient. The Spanish Ambassador has presented a note to Cardinal Antonelli, announcing the recognition of the Kingdom of Italy by Spain. Florence has now a daily paper printed in English, and called the Times. It is a sort of small Galignani, perhaps half the size of the Parisian print. PRUSSIA. Dr. Jacoby, of the Prussian Landtag, has been sentenced to six months' imprisonment for having, at a public meeting at Berlin, called upon his constituents to refuse to pay the taxes to an unconstitutional Government. Dr. Jacoby, a physician at Konigsburg, is a man well known for courage, integrity, and the services he has rendered his country in its constitutional struggles. His many pamphlets have frequently brought down legal prosecution upon his devoted head, but always ended in his acquittal. This is the first time he has been actually convicted. Dr. Frenzel, another able member of the Lower House, has also had two months' imprisonment awarded to him, for speaking disrespectfully of the King at a public meeting. The Prussian Government is determined to try the patience of the people. Banquets to the Liberal deputies, organized at Cologne and Deutz, have been broken up by the police, although the Provincial Court of Justice has recorded a decision against the legality of the proceeding. The people, however, are determined to test the question, and a similar banquet is in progress at Bremen, while a monster gathering of workpeople is being organized in Berlin, to try the right of public meeting.

How A Jealous Wife Tested hee Husbaitd. — The Paris correspondent of the Telegraph writes : — " I am now going to tell you a story which could only be true in Paris. M. Zero, a married man, received one morning the following note : — ' If your heart is free, and you have as much sentiment as you have wit, enter a carriage, which, at nine, p.m., tomorrow, will be waiting close to your house. You will say to the servant ' Fortune ;' he will reply ' Mystery.' If you do not come, it will be because there exists a woman happy enough to possess your affection. I shall envy her, but hate neither her nor yourself. Nothing is stronger than constant love, even if nothing is so delicious as a fleeting fancy. — Gabeielle.' M. Zero read the letter, smiled, and did — what do you think M. Zero did ? What would you have done, my respectable reader? Got into the carriage, perhaps, and been lost to respectable society for ever. M. Zero also got into a carriage, and drove direct to the head of the police. When at ' nine, p.m.,' the carriage stopped close to the door, it was immediately challenged, ' Qui va la ?' ' Fortune.' 'Et le contresigne V ' Mystery.' ' Passe Mystere, et tout va bien.' Then a gentleman got into the carriage, and told the coachman to drive to the nearest poste, in plain English, police station ; and there the belle Gabrielle passed the night. But the oddest thing waß that the belle Gabrielle seemed rather to like it than otherwise. The key to this enigma is, that Madame Zero was jealous even to poison and dagger point. M. Zero detected her handwriting, though disguised, had her taken up for an attempt to disturb conjugal happiness — a crime, I dare say, provided for by the ' Code Napoleon,' and not likely to fall into abeyance in this city — and so delighted bia wife, and revenged himself at the same time."

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18651007.2.10

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIV, Issue 121, 7 October 1865

Word Count
5,873

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIV, Issue 121, 7 October 1865

Working