Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE CUP DAY AT GOODWOOD.

[From the Saturday Review, August I.] The result of the race for the Goodwood Cup goes far to prove that the three-year-old fillies of the present season are better than the colts. The celebrated French filly, La Toucques, justified the confidence of her supporters by beating Buckstone completely j but sho was herself compelled to yield to an English filly which has been much less talked about, viz., Isoline. The defeat of Buckstone was not at all discreditable,' for it was not surprising that even his powerful frame proved unequal to the task of carrying a weight of iJst. 7lbs. over two and a-half miles of ground. A good three-year-old, being required to carry only fat. 71bs., ought to beat horses a year older running under Hot., unless they are of extraordinary quality. Bucksioue's speed aud staying power have been proved both in races which he did not win, and notably by his memorable victory over Tim Whiffler for the Ascot Cup. But as his success at Ascot imposed on him a penalty of 7ibs. for Goodwood, and thus brought up the weight he had to carry to 9st. 71bs., it could scarcely be hoped that he would pull through, if his three-year-old competitors turned out as good as one of them was reported. The French mare, La Touuques, ran second to The Ranger for the Grand Prize at Paris, a few days alter the English Derby, beating, atnongothers, Lord Clifden and daccbarometer. Adding to the difference for the year Buckstoue's penalty, and the allowance of 41bs. for La Toucques' sex the total difference between their weights amounted to 2st. 4lbs. It was not wonderful that, upon these terms, Bucketone should be beaten by La Toucques, or by any other filly of equal merit. The winner lsohue, ran third for the Oaks in the colours of Mr. Parr, aud she was purchased alterwards by Mr. Nay lor, who has thus coutnved to add that highly-valued trophy, the Goodwood Cup, to those richer pecuniary prizes, the Two Thousand Uuiueas and the Derby. The success ot Isoline at Goodwood affords ground tor arguing that Queen Bertha, who won the Oaks, is likely to succeed iiereafter. This opinion expressed itself, immediately after the race for the Goodwood Cup, in the betting which took place on the til. Ledger. Queen Benha was backed lor that race at 8 to 1, upon the calculation that, if she is better than Isoiuie, who is better than La Toucques, she is at least as good as The Ranger, and better than Lord CUTden. tiucli calculations art), to a certain extent, useful ; but it is uusate to rely upou them confidently. The hope of seeing a return match at Goodwood, between Tim WhiiUer and Buukstone, was extinguished by the striking out of Tim WhiiSer's name • tew days betore the race. But, indeed, that hope was almost inappreciably small, for it was not to be supposed that Tim could, in a few weeks, recover lroin that terrible struggle and defeat at Ascot, if, indeed, he ever recovers li-om it at all, so as to be liko his old sell upon a race course, which is doubtlul. It is not to be imagined that Buckstone was wholly unaffected by the efforts which he was compelled to make to secure victory over Tim Whiffler, and, perhaps, it was rather too hard of Mr. Merry to run him ugain so soon under a crushing weight, and against au antagonist of such formidable reputation as La Toucques. It will be remembered that a year ago, Tun Whiffldr— being then in his very best form, and carry iug ouly three-) ear-old weight — won the Goodwood Cup in a canter, by two lengths, leaving at that distance m his rear Zetland, who was followed alter another long interval by the Wizard. It is curious that last year two brown colts, Tim Whiffler and Zetland, were placed first and second for the Goudwood Cup, and this year the same distinction has been gained by two chestnut fillies, Isoline aud La Toucques. This, and some earlier tacts in the history ot contests lor this prize, go far to prove that three-year-olda are unduly favoured. Zetland ran again this year, but he did not come at all near winning. Lord St. Vincent, to whom he belongs, had intended to run another horse, Bellman, who, however, became disabled in the race for the Stakes the day beiore. Auother acquaintance of lost year was Fuirwater, now a fine-looking mare of five years old, and carrying only 4lbs. less than Buckstone. tier performance this year was very good, and proves that the excuse offered for her failure a year ago was not without foundation. 'Ihe only other candidates were the American mare Myrtle, who received the allowance in weight due to horses bred in America and the colonies, and the Duke of Beaufort's " pure bred Barb," Alazagau, who received an allowance large enough to show that the breed to which he belongs, if he is a fair sample of it, is quite unfit to contend with English race-horses over an English course. When the seven competitors paraded past the stand, Juckstoue, leading the van, looking all that his friends could desire, but it would be an improvement in his appearance if he could leave off the habit which he has ot looking back over his shoulder as he walks. His short back and strong loins were as conspicuous as ever, and his supporters, as they looked at them, wished that the finish was, as at Ascot, up a stiff bill, Bigger and stronger even than Buckstone wasZ.ethind, whose admirers hoped that, as Tim Whiffler was not present, he mifbt improve upon the sewnd plsttfy

whioh he obtained in this race last year. But weight will tell on the strongest frames, and Zetland has not improved enough in the year to carry 9-<t. as near the front as he did 7*t. 7lb. last year. Fairwater, the moot beautiful of the lot, was "ste.arlie.-d by 9st. 31b. ; but her excellent public performances, aided by her good looks and the confidence of her owner, caused a general impression that, if anything over three years old beat Buckstone, it would be Fairwater. In a race whioh preceded that for the Cup, the competitors trotted slowly for a considerable distance. The fashion thus set of taking things coolly was followed, for, in the Cup race, the lead was left without contest to the " pure bred Bard," Mazagan, during the first two miles. But, although the pace was moderate until the last half mile, weight and distance scattered the field almost as effectually as if a Tim Whiffler had been forcing the running from start to finish. The winner, Inline, did not shake off all her opponents in Tim Whiffler'fl style, but she beat La Toucques cleverly, and with something in hand. It is a pity she is not engaged in the St. Leger, for she could not fail to become a great favourite. Next to the two fillies, but beaten by ten or a dozen lengths, came Fairwater, followed by Buckstone and Zetland, neither of whom was persevered with beyond the distance. Myrtle came next, and the Barb trotted in last of all.

On the whole, it cannot be said that the racing on the Cup day was as interesting as it has sometimes been. The same observation applies to the proceedings of the day before. The Goodwood Stakes are scarcely less important than the Cup itself, and this race, being a handicap, possesses in an eminent degree that quality of uncertainty which belongs moie or less to all races. The three-year-old, An field, murker! out as the certain winner of the Stikes, was only able to obtain second honour*. It was reported that he had been proved by careful trial, to be better than Macaroni, but he was beaten by a horse named Blackdown, whom nobody ever heard of before, and who is stated to have bean purchasable last winter for the very moderate price of £25 — a statement which may, however, have been made in order to disguise the horce's quality. Another outsider, Jack of Hearts, rather distinguished himself by making the run from the start and finishing third. The Drawing-room Stakes, for three-year-olds, on the same day, brought out the winner of the Derby, with whom only two horses ventured to contend. With odds freely befted on him, Macaroni, in spite of a penalty of lOlbs., cantered in an easy winner. The laat race of the day was really the only one which produced anything like a struggle. The four-year-old, Principal, and the three-year-old, Microscope, carrying about weight for age, made a magnificent finish, resulting in the victory of the old horse, by a length. The Goodwood meeting was favoured by delightful weather, and the beauties of that most picturesque race-course were never seen to greater advantage. ■ This wrek will be remembered, as an example difficult to surpass, of what England can do in the way of summer when she tries. The meeting of 1863 will 'also be regarded with complacency, for the proof whioh it afforded that the French mare, La Toucques, of whom her own nation thought so highly, really was very good, and also that it was possible to find in England another mare a trifle better. If it had happened that La Toucques had beaten Isoline, there would still have been a partial salve available for Eni;lish vanity in the observation that, although the winner was bred in France, she was trained at Middleham, in Yorkshire. But, however, La Tourques just missed the prize, after running for it in a style which may well satisfy her countrymen. At any rate, she has beaten Buckstone; and another French mare, Stradella, beat the Marquis at Newmarket. It should be added that, in the Molecombe Stakes, for two-year-olds, on Thursday, the French Fille de lAir beat, among others, Mr. Merry's Scottish Chief, whom the public have been very much disposed to elevate into the same position which Thormnnby, Dundee, and Buckstoue occupied for many months before the Derby.

The week of Goodwood races ha* been additionally distinguished by the appearance in it of a decision upon the long-pending Tomato case. There is not time now available to say more about this case than that it is wonderful how people could have brought themselves to think that it was doubtful.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18631110.2.7

Bibliographic details

THE CUP DAY AT GOODWOOD., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXII, Issue 113, 10 November 1863

Word Count
1,742

THE CUP DAY AT GOODWOOD. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXII, Issue 113, 10 November 1863

Working