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MONTHLY SUMMARY OF EVENTS.

At length we have a declaration from Sir George Grey of the policy he intends to pursue towards the natives. The steamer, which arrived yesterday from Auckland, brought us the following manifesto of his Excellency, but short time we have at our disposal will prevent oui? noticing this important document in our present issue. The Governor had returned from the North, where he had been well received by the Ngapuhis, and had proceeded, in company with Mr. Fox to the AVaikato country. The late intelligence from that district, however, has not been very satisfactory, as various outrages have been committed in the neighbourhood upon European settlers. Mr. Mantell, late Native Minister, has resigned his office, but his successor has not yet been named, The journey of the Bishop into the Ngatiruanui country is generally regarded as a failure, although his Lordship affects to be satisfied with the result.

These are some of the thoughts of the Governor, of Sir George Grey, towards the Maoris at tin's time. His desire is, how to arrange thing 3, that there may be good laws made, and those law 3be put in force j and how all men, both European and Maori, may be taught to work for the common good of the country in which they live: that they may be a happy people, rich, wise, well instructed, and every year advancing in prosperity. For it is the desire of the Queen (whose heart was dark when she heard of the troubles in New Zealand), that all her subjects, both Europeans and Maoris, m all parts of these islands, should have the benefits of law and order ; that the lives and persons of all men should be safe from destruction and injury ; and that every man should have for himself and enjoy his own lands, hi 9 cattle, his horses, 1»9 sheep, his ship, his money, or whatever else belongs to him. And it is tlie desire of tho Queen that all her subjects should help in making the laws by which they are governed, and that, from amongst them, should be appointed wise and good men as Magistrates, to adjudge in cases of disputed rights and punish the wrong-doer, and to teach the law, how it should be obeyed.

The Europeans in New Zealand, with the help of the Governor, make laws for themselves, and have their own Magistrates ; and, because they obey those laws, they are rich, they have large houses, great ships, horses, sheep, cattle, corn, and all other good things for the body. They have also ministers of religion, teachers of schools ; lawyers, to teach the law ; surveyors, to measure every man's land j doctors, to heal tho sick ; carpenters, blacksmiths, and all those other persons who make good things for the body, and teach good things for tlie souls and minds of tho Europeans. It is because they have made wise and good laws, and because they look up to the Queen as the one head over all the magistrates, and over all the several bodies of which the English people consist.

It is the desire of the Queen, and this also is the thought of Governor Grey nnd of the runanga of the pakehas, that the Maoris also should do for themselves as the Europeans do. They know that of late years the Maoris have been seeking for law and order. The Englishmen have been more than a thousand years learning how to make laws and to govern themselves well. The Maori has only just begun this work. Besides this, in order to have Magistrates, and policemen, and other officers, it is necessary to pay thorn, for the labourer i 9 worthy of his hire ; and he who works for the whole body of the people, should be paid by the people ; for while he works for them he must, more or less, neglect his own work.

Now, the thought of the Governor is, how he may help the Maoris in the work of making laws, and how he may provide for the payment of the Magistrates, and other officers of Government, till such time as the Maoris shall hare become rich, and be able to pay all the expenses themselves. In order, then, to provide tlie machinery of good government among the Maoris in these islands, the Governor desires to see established the following system, whereby good laws may be made, well-disposed persons be protected, bad men restrained from violence, and security for life and property be ensured to all. 1. The parts of the island inhabited by Maoris will be marked off into several districts, according to tribes or divisions of tribes, and the convenience of the natural features of the country. To every one of these districts tlie Governor will send a learned and good European to assist the Maoris iv the work of making laws and enforcing them ; he will be called the Civil Commissioner. There will be a runangu for that district, which will consist of a certain number of men who will be chosen from the assessors. The Civil Commissioner will be the President of that ruiianga to guide its deliberations, and if tho votes are equal on any matter, he will have a casting vote to decide. This runanga will propose the laws for that district, about the trespass of cattle, about cattle pounds, about fences, about branding cattle, about thistles and weeds, about dogs, about spirits and drunkenness, about putting down bad customs of the old Maori law, like the taua, and about tlie various things which specially concern the people living in that district. They will also make regulations about schools, about roatls, if they wish for them, and about other matters which may promote the public good of that district. And all these laws which the district runangns may propose will be laid before tlie Governor, and he will say if they are good or not. If he says they are good, they will become law for all men in that district to which they relate. If he says they are not good, then the runanga must make some other law which will be better. This is the way with the laws which the Europeans make in ,their runangas, both in New Zealand and in the great ruuanga of the Queen in England,

2. Every district will be subdivided into hundreds, and in each of these there will be assessors appointed. The men of that district will choose who shall be assessors, only the Governor will have tlie word to decide whether tlie choice is good or not.

Tlie Magistrate, with the«e assessors, will hold courts for disputes about debts of money, about cattle trespass, about all breaches of the law in that district. They will decide in all these case 9.

3. In every hundred there will be policemen, and one chief policeman, who will be under the assessors. These policemen shall summon all persons against whom there are complaints before the court of the assessors, and when the assessors shall have decided, the policemen will see that the orders of the assessors are carried out. All fines which shall be paid shall be applied to some public uses. The commissioner or Magistrate will keep thia money till it is required. 4. The runangas will also beassisted in establishing and maintaining schools and teachers ; sometimes Europeans, sometimes Maoris, will ba appointed. The Maoris ought to pay pnrt of the salary of tho school teacher, the Governor ivill pay t)ie resfc.

5. Where the runangas wish to have an European doctor to live umong them, tlie Governor will endeavour to procure one to reside tliere, and will pay him so much salary as may muke him willing to go to that work. The doctor will give medicine to the Maoris when they are sick, and will tench them what things are good for the rearing of their children, to raak^ them strong and healthy, nnd how to prolong the lives of all the Maoris by eating good food, by keeping their houses clean, by having proper clothes and other things relating to their health. This will be the business of the doctor. But all those who require the services of the doctor wiil pay for them, except such as the runanga may decide to be too poor to do so.

6. About, the lands of the Maoris. It will be for the runanga to decide all disputes about tlie lanrls. It will bo good that each runanga should make n register, in which should bo written a statement of all the lands within the district of that runanga, so that everybody may know, and that there may be no more disputings about land.

This then is what the Governor intends to do, to assist the Maori in the good work of establishing law and order. These are the first things : — the runangas, the assessors, tho 'policemen, the schools, the doctors, the civil commissioners to assist tho Maoris to govern themselves, to make good laws, and to protect the weak against tbe strong. Tliere will be mnny more things to be planned and to be decided ; but about such things the runangas and the commissioners will consult. TIII3 work will be a work of time, like the growing of a large tree, at first there is the seed, then there is one trunk, then there are branches innumerable, and very many leaves ; by and by, perhaps, there will be fruit also. But the growth of the tree is slow, the branches, the leaves, and fruit did not

appear all at once, when the seed was put in the ground : and so will it be with the good laws of the runanga. This is the seed which the tiovernor desires to sow: — the runangas, the assessors, the commissioners, and the rest. By the bye, perhaps, the seed will grow into a very great tree, which will bear good fruit on all its branches. The Maoris then must assist in the planting of this tree, in the training of its branches, iv cultivating the ground about its roots; and, as the tree grows, the children of the Maori, al&o, will grow to be a rich, wise, and prosperous people, like the English and those other nations which long ago began the work of making good laws, and obeying them. Thia will be the work of peace, on which the blessing of Providence will rest, which will make the storms to pass away from the sky, and all things become light between the Maori and the p.ikeha ; and the heart of the Queen will then be glad when she hears that the two races are living quietly together, as brothers, in the good and prosperous land of New Zealand.

The Hawhe's Bay Herald of the 9th of November last, had some information of the Governor's intentions, as will be seen by the following extract from that journal of the above named date : —

Sir George Grey believes he will be able to settle native matters without resort to force, unless with the Taranakis and Ngatiruanuis ; and intends to introduce extensive machinery of government amongst the natives. The details will shortly, wo believe, be published ; meanwhile we are enabled to subjoin an outline. There will be established :—: — 1. Districts (3ay fifteen or twenty) witli Civil Commissioners at head. 2. Sub-districts (hundreds) with Resident Magistrates. * 3. Village runangas (native). 4. District runangas, composed of assessors and chief men of village runangas, say twelve members each. To be paid at the rate of £50 per annum each member. 5. Assessors (paid). 6. Police. Chief, £30 a-year; inferior, £10 and Buit of clothes. 7. Medical officers. 8. Schools, teachers, &c. 9. The runanga (ceutral), to have tho following functions : — 1. Judicial. 2. Administrative. 3. Taxation for local purposes. 4. Land titles, and power of lease and salt to actual occupants. 5. Power to make by-laws. 10. The Supremo Court Judges to hold sessions in native districts, so that great crimiuals may be

tried there.

Thi3 system is estimated to cost £50,000 per annum, a large sum. At present, however, the colony is appropriating £26,000 for native purposes, and John Bull is paying £1,250,000 for military operations in New Zealand. Tho new system will cost just double the amount at present expended for native purposes. There is no idea of removing any of the troops at present, but as the militia force will not be called into requisition, a great saving iv this direction will be elfected to the colony.

The second Provincial Council of Nelson having expired by effluxion of time, we have been called upon, during the past month, to elect a new Superintendent, and Saturday, the 30th ultimo, was fixed as the day of nomination. Three candidates came forward, namely, Mr. J. P. llobinson, the late Superintendent, Mr. W. L. Wrey, and Mr. J. W. Barnicoat. Mr. Robinson was proposed by Mr. A. Saundcrs, who highly extolled that gentleman's conduct during the past four years in which he has held office, and abused, in coarse and unmeasured terms, those persons who ventured to hold opinions contrary to liia own, and who did not regard Mr. Robinson's conduct in office so highly as he affected to do himself. Mr. Tatton seconded the nomination. Mr. Wrey was proposed by Mr. Lovel, and seconded by Mr. Huddleston. Mr. Barnicoat was proposed by Mr. Fearon, and seconded by Mr. C. Elliott, both of whom, in addressing the electors, complained of Mr. Kobinaon's want of energy, and con-

tended that, under his Government, the province had not made that progress which might reasonably have been expected of it. Mr. Robinson addressed the electors at some length, and defended himself against the charges brought against him. Mr. Wrey's address -was brief ; he complained of the past administration of the officers of the province, and promised, if elected, they should improve in his hands. Mr. Barnicoat, after reproving Mr. Saunders for his gross personal attacks on himself, gave a manly exposition of his principles, and the course he would pursue to promote the welfare of the province, if elected. A show of hands was then taken, which gave a large majority for Mr. Robinson; a poll was then demanded by Mr. Barnicoat, and this will take place on the 23rd instant. Mr. Wrey has since resigned.

Do* Mountain Railway. — This railway is rapidly approaching completion. Seven miles of the line from Brook-street to the mine, and two miles of the line which will pass through the town are already completed. The whole will be open in February next.

West Coast Diggings. — The schooner Gipsy arrived on Thursday, November 21, from the Buller river, with by far the most favourable intelligence we had then received of the gold prospects on the West Coast. Our correspondent's letter given below, furnishes only a portion of the information which then reached us, which was all of a most encouraging nature. The nuggetty character of the gold now being obtained there favours the idea of the richness of the field, and in one lot of forty ounces which we have seen of large coarse gold, there was a nugget weighing 1 oz. 17 dwts., and another 1 oz. 12 dwts. A private letter said (the writer of which is a highly-respectable man), "I do believe the Buller will turn out richer than the Otago diggings." There were only twenty-three Europeans at work there, and no one made less than £1 per day. Buller River, November 16. The Waimangaroha, spite of its neglect and snubbing by our Provincial authorities, still holds its way triumphantly as a gold-bearing region. By tho boat now leaving jou will receive in Nelson some 176 ounces of as nice gold as you could wish to see. One nugget obtained here weighs slightly over two ounces, and several in the parcel now forwarded to Nelson exceed one ounce each.

All the claims on theWaimangarohaare turning out exceedingly well, though the weather has been wretchedly bad. I said you would receive 176 ounces by this trip, but I should also mention that there are, at the least, 400 ounces in the hands of diggers, consequent on the fact of there not being money here to purchase it. This gold has nearly all been got within the last month by twenty-three Europeans and about eighty natives. The newly worked branch of the Inongahua has yielded first-rate to the prospectors, and three parties have set in who are getting coarse gold in quantity. The higher parties go up the river the coarser the gold becomes ; and the gold in the Inongahua differs much in appearance from that obtained in the Waimangaroha. One great convenience we have here is, that parties can have their goods conveyed by the River Buller for a distance of some thirty miles by canoe.

Wangapeka Diggings. —We have lately been led to make inquiries respecting these diggings, as the season is now advancing in which we might look for some of the golden results anticipated for some time after their discovery ; results which were marred, however, by the long and unusually wet winter just passed, and also by the fact that a large number of those who would have tried their fortune there have left for the more enticing prospects held out by our southern neighbours at Otago. The answers to our inquiries are, we are glad to say, decidedly encouraging. From sources that may be depended on we learn that, although there are only about fifty diggers now at work in the district, the majority of these may be considered as doing very well, an evidence of which is that they are paying their way regularly. In Blue creek there are about ten or twelve men, said to be averaging one ounce per day, per man. In Rolling river and Nuggetty creek about the same number of men ; those in the former place, averaging twenty-five to thirty shillings per day, and in the' latter making very good wages. In the Batten river about the same number are at work ; the members of one party each making ten to fifteen shillings per day, and the rest prospecting with favourable results. On the Tadmore range, about five parties are now at work, probably from fifteen to eighteen men in all. One party of four are said to be making two ounces per day, and another very good wages. The rest are prospecting and preparing to set in immediately. This locality, namely, the dividing range between the Tadmore and Sherry rivers, promises to turn out very rich in gold. We have heard it asserted that as much as one ounce of gold has been obtained from four barrow-loads of stuff. The diggers, however, have to contend with one difficulty, Avhich is that sufficient water is not obtainable for the working of the ground so profitably as it might be. It appears, however, that it is in contemplation, by a strong party, to remedy this deficiency by conveying Avater for a mile or two from a higher level, by a flume or lead, to the spot where the gold is found in greatest abundance; and, should this be successful, we have no doubt that it will lead to this range being thoroughly searched and prospected during the ensuing summer ; a comparatively easy task, from its nearness and accessibility^ compared with the country around Blue creek and the adjoining diggings. We have also been informed that a quan-

tity of the land laid oft' as a township by Mr. Oliver in Motueka valley has been sold, amounting to 1,000 acres, and that other parties are still looking out for suitable localities in the surrounding neighbourhood. An impulse having been thus given to the settlement of this district, we hope that it may lead to the speedy establishment of a complete community, the progress of which will be materially assisted by the presence of a probably numerous gold-digging population, which there appears every reason to believe will yet find steady and profitable employment in the surrounding country.

Gold from: Wangapeka. — We saw recently some very good samples of coarse nuggetty gold, which had been obtained in this district. One sample of several ounces was, we think, the brightest coloured gold which has been obtained in this province. Several of the pieces weighed one pennyweight, and the whole of what was shown to us was very coarse, and not water-worn. It had been obtained in but a few days by two persons, who, however, declined to mention the spot from which they got it. West Coast Coal. — The schooner Mary, chartered by the Provincial Government to procure a cargo of coal from the River Grey, on the west coast of this province, returned to Nelson last week with thirty-four tons, obtained from a seam on the banks of that river, which, of homogeneous pure coal, presents a thickness of 12 feet 7 inches. No official account of the trip has yet been published, but we hear the Mary entered and left the river with the greatest ease, and tliafo the coal was procured without any difficulty; but, as no precise instructions were given to the person sent to get the coal out, no care was taken in the selection, the very outer portion of the seam having been brought away, as is shown by portions of moss which adhered to it. On Tuesday last a few tons of the coal were put on board the Tasmanian Maid and the first trial of it, for steam purposes, took place, by the little steamer towing out to sea the ship Gladiator, of 600 tona, drawing thirteen feet eight inches of water, at half flood tide. A number of gentlemen, who took a deep interest in the success of the coal, accompanied the steamer on this trip, but we were surprised to find that no member of the Government was present, Although steam was got up on this occasion afterthe boilers had beenfilledwith cold water, the time occupied in so doing was only fifty minutes, which the engineer of the steamer stated to be thirty to forty minutes less time than steam could be got up with Newcastle (Sydney) coal. After towing out the Gladiator, the Tasmanian Maid headed towards Motueka, and remained altogether under steam about three hours. On her return to the wharf we conversed with those under whose special care the consumption of coal had taken place and received from, them the gratifying information that the coal produced steam at least equally well with the best sample of Newcastle coal. It was remarkably clean and free from clinkers, and, so far as it was tested, it answered exceedingly well for steam purposes and may be pronounced a decided success- We frequently heard the engineer and his assistants say that they had seen no New Zealand coals which would at all equal them. Iron Sand. — It will be remembered tbat, a short time ago, large deposits of iron 3and were discovered on the western side of Blind Bay in almost inexhaustible quantities, .and that a sample of it had been forwarded to Melbourne for assay. We now have much pleasure in stating that the ore has been declared highly valuable, and, consequently, the leaseholders, Messrs. Weyergang and Wiesenhavern, have sent a large quantity of the sand to London, in order to ascertain its practical use and actual commercial value. We sincerely hqpe that the English steel manufacturers will, as expected, be glad of an opportunity to import this valuable article, the qualities of which have now been, proved beyond a doubt as applicable for fine. hardware and cutlery, for, should a company be formed for either smelting or exporting the iron sand, it would be of great service to the province and the colony at large. A very large sample of this iron sand is to be forwarded to England for the International Exhibition.

Nelson College. — An election of three Governors of this College was held at the Court House, on Thursday, November 14,. when Messrs. Domett, Barnicoat, and Dr. Monro, whose term of office had expired, were unanimously re-elected, and will hold office for the next nine years. The neV Principal of the College, Mr. Reginald Broughton, a gentleman who has taken the highest University honours, was to leave England for Nelson in the early part of last month, and his arrival here may therefore be expected early in the year. New Police Court. — The contract for the new Police Court has been taken by Mr. Henry, for the sum of £937. It is to be erected in about six months and will immediately adjoin the southern portion of the Government Buildings in Bridge-street.

The New Cemetery. — The new cemetery on the Wakapuaka road has been recently opened for public interments, and our Provincial Government have issued a notice that those previously in use in this town are, for the future, closed. Road between Nelson and Maelbohough. — A trial line for a new road over the Mokatapu, has been cut under the direction of the Provincial Engineer, and it is found that a far better road may be obtained than that afforded by the old line, avoiding altogether the swampy ground on the top of the mountain ; and that the range can be crossed at a less elevation by 500 feet than by the road, at present used. The ascent

and descent of the mountain can also be accomplished by a much easier gradient than the old road offered. As all the rivers between the Mokatapu range and Blenheim will shortly be bridged, or have ferry boats established upon them, the improvement of the road at this end is of great importance, and will have the effect of reducing the journey between Nelson and Marlborough to a single day's ride.

Opening of the Temperance Hall.— The newly-erected Temperance Hall was publicly opened on Tuesday evening last, when about 400 persons partook of tea. After the tables had been cleared, Mr. A. Saunders, M.H.E., was unanimously requested to occupy the chair, which he did in a very efficient manner. The meeting, which was one of the largest ever held in Nelson, was addressed by several speakers, among whom were Messrs. Crisp, Hill, Cresswell, Austin, Gardner, Gilbert, and Burn. About fifty-two persons subsequently signed the pledge. The evening's enjoyment was much increased by several hymns, which were very nicely sung.

Chamber of Commerce. — A meeting of this body was held on Thursday, the 21st November, when it was agreed, after some discussion, to forward a memorial to the General Government, calling upon them to relieve the province from the loss and inconvenience occasioned by the non-appointment of a Judge to the District Court, which, since the repeal of the " Eesident Magistrates' Extended Jurisdiction Act," compels creditors, for amounts over twenty pounds, to resort to the Supreme Court, whose sittings are held only twice a-year. Another subject for consideration was an alleged delay in the delivery of the Northern mails on the last arrival of the Airedale ; but, after some explanations had been given, it appeared to be the almost unanimous opinion, of the Chamber that no unnecessary delay had occurred, and that not the slightest blame was attributable to the Post-office authorities on th 6 occasion. The following is the memorial above referred to : — - To his Excellenoy Sir George Geey, X.C.8., Ad-

ministratoi* of the Government of New Zealand.

The respectful Memorial of the Nelson Chamber of Commerce —

Your memorialists respectfully represent that, in consequence of the resignation of the late Judge of the "Oiatfict Court for this province, no means has, for jnany months past, existed for the recovery of debts otherwise than either through the Supremo Court, which sits but twice in the year, or through the Resident Magistrate's Court, which has jurisdiction over debts up to amounts of twenty pounds only.

Your memorialists respectfully represent that the mercantile and trading interests, in common with the community generally, are thereby subject to much loss aud inconvenience. Your memorialists, therefore, pray that your Excellenoy will be pleased to cause the jurisdiction of the Besident Magistrate's Court to be extended to amounts of one hundred pounds, as formerly, or that a Judge of the District Court be appointed with as little delay as possible. And your memorialists will ever pray. Signed, on behalf of the Chamber of Commerce, Oswald Curtis, Chairman.

Kelson Chamber of Commerce, November 28, 1861. The Weather. — The year 1861 will be Ion" memorable in the past of New Zealand for its heavy rains and constantly recurring floods, exceeding anything of the kind we have witnessed in our twenty years' experience in the colony. The rain began to fall on Friday evening, November 22, and, for a few hours, partook more of the character of a thick mist. Towards midnight it increased and. continued to come down heavily during the greater part of Saturday, but during Saturday night and part of Sunday it poured in a manner we have seldom seen equalled. Of course all the creeks and streams overflowed, and the banks of both the Maitai and the Brook-street stream sustained some damage. When the flood subsided, the bridge in Nile-street across the Brook-street stream was found standing on dry shingle, the water having cut out a new channel on the east side of it. Some slips also took place on the hill sides, and damaged a few gardens. Provincial Government Gazette. — By the Government Gazette of this province, dated November 11, the abstract of receipts and disbursements of the Provincial Treasurer, for the quarter ended September 30, 1861, Bhows that there has been received, for Ordinary Revenue, the sum of £2,611 14s. 5d. ; Incidental Eeceipts, £474 6s. Id. ; and Territorial Revenue, . £3,901 17s. lid. ; making a total of £6,987 18s. sd. The disbursements have been, Departmental, £2,769 Bs. 4d. ; Miscellaneous, £1,517 os. 6d. ; Public Works and Purposes, £3,519 10s. 4d. ; Supplementary Contingencies, £51 11s. 6d. ; making a total of disbursements amounting to £7,857 10s. 6d. A balance of £8,766 Bs. lOd. has been carried to the next quarter. By the same Gazette the amount of Customs Eevenue collected at the Port of Nelson for the quarter ended September 30th, is stated to have been £6,079 3s. 3d., and that at the Port of Collingwood was £70 13s. 9d., making together a total of £6,149 17s. By the same Gazette it is shown the Commissioners of Immigration have received, for the six months ended September 30, 1861, for assisted passages repaid, £622 2s. 9d. ; while they have expended for immigration, £1,379 2s. 9d. ; miscellaneous, £30 16s. Id. A balance of £1,748 7s. lOd. has been carried forward. The Laud Revenue for the quarter ended the 30th of September 1861, was £3,064 17s. Id., of which £2,316 15s. was for land sales £572 2a. Id. surplus revenue from gold-fields, £140 deposits for runs, and £36 for Crown Grants. The Customs Revenue of this province for the quarter ended the 30th of September 1861, was £6,149 175. Amusements. — During the past month the monotony of our social system has been agreeably broken by the presence of a small but respectable dramatic company, who have occupied the Odd-Fellows' Hall as their theatre. They have produced, in their "drawing-room entertainments," a variety of well-chosen comedies, farces, dramas, and food Shakesperian selections, which have een uniformly well represented. Mrs. Foley, as directress, has taken great pains

in the stage arrangements and costumes ; and great credit is due to our townsman, Mr. T. Hodgson, for his well-executed scenery. Mr. Vernon Webster, who performed the leading parts, Mr. Swanu, comedian, and Mrs. Foley, whose versatile talents have so much delighted us, leave to-morrow for the south with our high appreciation of their merits, and a wish for their return to enliven us at a future season. The want of amusement U much felt, and we are glad to see that performers of any worth ai'e not meanly supported. The services of the Volunteers' band, who filled the orchestra, we must not omit to acknowledge.

Motueka Cricket Match. — The match between Wakefield and Motueka came off on the Motueka cricket ground, on Thursday, the 28th of November, when the Wakefield beat in one innings, Avith forty-eight runs to spare. The day was very fine and, the Wakefield brass band being in attendance, afforded much delight to the numerous spectators. After the match the Motueka men invited Wakefield to dine at Harding's, the Swan Inn. About forty sat down to an excellent dinner, and spent a very pleasant evening. The German Settlers and Colonel Gore Broavne. — A meeting of the German settlers was held on the 6th November, to take into consideration the policy carried out by the late Governor, Colonel Gore Browne, particularly with reference to the natives. Mr. F. Tietjen was called to the chair ; and, after several gentlemen had addressed the meeting, and fully stated its object, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted :—: — Proposed by Mr. F. Kelling, and seconded by Mr. Dencker :—: —

That this meeting agrees with the native policy of our late Governor, Colonel Gore Browne, and has the fullest confidence that his Excellency's Government, if permitted so to do, would have brought the native difficulties to a successful issue. Proposed by Mr. H. Lankow, and seconded by Mr. Springer — That, in consequence of the above expressed opinion, this meeting regrets the removal of Colonel Gore Browne as Governor of this colony. Proposed by Mr. Dencker, and seconded by Mr. Balk—

That this meeting, and the German colonists in this province generally, are fully sensible of the benefits derived from the policy which his Excellency Colonel Gore Browne carried out with respect to Bepi-esentative Government according to our Constitution Act. Proposed by Mr. F. Kelling — That this meeting wishes that Colonel and Mrs. Gore Browne may enjoy many years of health, happiness, and prosperity. After all the above resolutions had been unanimously carried, many of those who were present desired to subscribe their names to a testimonial to his Excellency ; but others thinking that the opinions expressed in the above resolutions as to his Excellency's able administration of the Government were a sufficient testimonial in themselves, and that nothing further was required, it was ultimately determined that their expression of sympathy with the late Governor's policy, embodied in the above resolutions, was amply sufficient to explain their opinions.

Blood Stock for Nelson. — "We have noticed, on two former occasions, the purchase of thoroughbred horses, made in England by our fellow-settler Mr. "W. Eobinson, of Cheviot hills, Amuri, with the view of shipping them out to this province, and we are now able to give a complete list of Mr. Eobinson's purchases up to the departure of the last mail. These comprise three colts, by Hesperus, Barnfcon, and Touchstone, and 1 six fillies, by Gemma di Vergy, Sweetmeat, Voltigeur, Newminster, Backbiter, and Stockwell. Not only are these horses of the very best and most fashionable blood in England, but our spirited New Zealander has spared neither trouble nor expense to procure the best animals bred in England, his object having been to secure horses of great power, calculated to breed the class which everyone is anxious to get, but which so few are able to obtain. In this pursuit, Mr. Eobinson visited all the principal breeding establishments in England, and, when he saw a horse that took his fancy, price did not prevent his becoming the purchaser of it. Thus, for the Deformed filly (now named Symmetry), he gave 450 guineas, for the Voltigeur filly, 500, for the Hesperus colt, 310, and for the Newminster filly, 200. "We have not heard the cost of the remaining lots, but they are all of too good a sort to be picked up cheaply, except by accident, and the whole nine must represent rather a stiff figure. The yearlings (now about twenty months old) ail stand from 15 hands to 15 hands 1\ inches high, and measure, in the girth, from 5 feet 9 inches to 6 feet 2^ inches. The whole lot, except Symmetry, which may be kept back to run for the Oaks, were to be shipped for Nelson, and, on their arrival here, will most probably go into Mr. Redwood's stables, and we shall very likely see some of them show on the New Zealand turf next year. With the single exception of the purchases made last year by Mr. Fisher, of Adelaide (who invested in five of England's best mares, and one of her most fashionable stallions), Mr. Eobinson's purchases are the most valuable that have ever been made for a British colony, and everyone in New Zealand is interested in seeing them arrive here safely. But it is not with horse stock alone that Mr. Robinson is about to enrich the colony, for it is his intention to send out almost every kind of animal and bird that can beprocuredin England, and whosepreaence here would be considered an advantage and we hope, at no distant day, to have to welcome the arrival, in Blind Bay, of a second Ark, but a more navigable one than the structure that contained the family of Noah and a male and female of every kind. "When wealth, the reward of well directed enterprise, falls into hands that expend it on objects of general utility, it is " twice bless'd " and the possessor becomes indeed a public benefactor. The following is the list of Mr. Eobinson's purchases, with their pedigrees in full : — Diomedes, bay colt, two years old, by Hesperus, out of Diomedia (sister to Weathergage), by Weatherbit, out of Taurina, by Taurus — Esmeralda by Zinganee ; Hesperus by Bay Middleton, out of Plenary (sister to Plenipotentiary), by Emilius, out of Harriet, by Pericles. Golden Gbate, bay colt, two years old, by Burnt on,

out of Hop-piolver, by Orlando, out of Hopbine, by Sir Hercules — Sylph by Spectre— Fanny Leigh by Castrel ; Barnton (own brother to Yolligeur) by Vollaire, out of Martha Lynn, by Mulatto— Leda by Filho da Puta —Treasure by Cumilliis* Eavenswoktii, bay or brown yearling polt, by Touchstone, out of Fair Jean, by Yerulum, out of Fair Helen, by Pantaloon — Rebecca by Lottery ; Touchstone by Camel, out of Banter, by Master Henry. Symmetry, yearling filly by Gemma cli Vergy, out of the Deformed, by Burgundy or Harkaway, out of Welfare, by Priam —Vat by Langar ; Gemma cli Vcrgy by Sir Hercules, out of Snowdrop, by Heron — Fairy by Filbo da Puta — Britannic by Orville. Cokonaria, brown yearling filly by Sweetmeat, out of Jessica, by Launcelot — Collina by Langar — Lady Stafford by Corraus ; Sweetmeat by Gladiator out of Lollypop, by Starch or Voltaire — Belinda by Blaektock — Wagtail by Prime Minister. The Moa, brown yearling filly (own sister to Vedette and Qui Vive) by Voltigeur, out of a Birdcatcher mare, her darn Nan Darrell, by Inheritor — Nell by Blacklock. Gratitude, bay yearling filly by Newminster, out of Charity, by Melbourne — Benevolence by Figaro ; Newminster by Touchstone, out of Beeswing, by Dr. Syntax. Altisidorian, brown yearling filly by Backbiter, out of Sangfroid (Indifference's dam), by Gameboy, dam by Muley Moloch, out of Lilla, by Blacklock ; Backbiter by Gladiator or Don John, out of Scandal, by Selim, out of Haphazard — Precipitate — Colibri, by Woodpecker. Reconnaissance, bay yearling filly by Stockwell, out of Sortie (dam of Stockade and Citadel), by Melbourne, ont of E«calade, by Touchstone, out of Gliuznee, by Pantaloon ; Stockwell by the Baron, out of Poeahontas, by Glenco.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18611212.2.8

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MONTHLY SUMMARY OF EVENTS., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XX, Issue 107, 12 December 1861

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MONTHLY SUMMARY OF EVENTS. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XX, Issue 107, 12 December 1861

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