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THE ELECTIONS. MOTUEKA DISTRICT.

The nomination of candidates for the representation of the Motueka district took place on Friday last, at the Institution, Motueka.

Captain Fearon proposed, and Mr. Nason seconded, the nomination of Mr. H. E. Curtis, the late representative of the district. Mr. M'Mahon proposed, and Mr. Wilkie seconded, the nomination of Mr. Charles Parker.

The Returning Officer (A. Le Grand Campbell, Esq.), having asked if any elector had any other candidate to propose, and receiving no reply, called upon Mr. Curtis to address the electors. Mr. Curtis addressed the electors at some length, at the same time stating that he had so lately addressed the electors in different parts of the district, in accordance with the advertisement calling the different meetings, and had discussed most of the leading subjects occupying the attention of members of the House of Representatives during the late sessions, that he did not think it necessary again to discuss them ; but that, should any elector desire to question him, he would be happy to answer him. Mr. Sutcliffb and Mr. M'Mahon put various questions, all of which were duly answered. Mr. Parker next addressed the electors, and, after he had answered the questions put to him, The Returning Officer called for a bViow o£ hands ; the result being that eight hands were held up for Mr. Curtis, and eight for Mr. Parker. The Returning Officer then gave his casting vote for Mr. Curtis, and declared that unless a poll was demanded, that gentleman would be duly elected. Mr. M'Mahon and Mr. Wilkie demanded a poll for Mr. Parker.

We are informed that on Tuesday evening, the 22nd, Mr. Curtis attended a meeting of electors at Upper Moutere, who, after listening to his address, passed a resolution unanimously in his favour. On the following evening, a meeting was held at Lower Moutere, which was numerously attended, and a resolution wns unanimously passed favourable to Mr. Curtis.

On Thursday, at Motueka, the meeting was still larger, and passed a resolution, with only three dissentients, highly approving of Mr. Curtis's conduct in the Assembly, in support of the policy of the present Ministry, more especially in reference to the Maori rebellion. The poll is appointed to take place on Tuesday, February 5. SUBURBAN DISTRICTS. The nomination of a candidate to represent the Suburban Districts in the General Assembly, took place in the School-house, Stoke, on Monday last. The Returning Officer having read the writ, Mr. W. Songeb proposed, and W. Wells, Esq., seconded, James Balfour Wemyss, Esq., to represent the districts. No other candidate being proposed, Mr. Weinyss was declared duly elected. Mr. Wemyss, in a short speech, returned thanks. WAIMEA DISTRICTS. The nomination of candidates to represent these districts, took place at Richmond yesterday. Mr. J. Hammond proposed Mr. F. Kelling, observing that, if elected, Mr. Kelling was a man who could be depended upon, which was more than could bo said of every oandidate who asked for their suffrages. Mr. Habknebs seconded Mr. Kelling, who, he stated had already in the Assembly as their representative, shown himself to be a painstaking member, always at his duty. Mr. HoitN proposed Mr. A. Saunders, and addressed the electors at considerable length, the burden of his speech being abuse of tlio Stafford Ministry. Some of their crimes he enumerated ; they had disallowed the bill for selling the waste lands of the province on credit ; they had refused to give compensation to the New Zealand Company's labourers, without instituting an inquiry into the claims by a commission appointed by the Governor ; they had passed Acts for taxing the people (the District Courts Act) ; and they had foiled to pass any measures which had in view the practical good of the colony. Mr. Hubbard seconded Mr* Sanders's nomination. Mr. Creasy proposed, and Mr. Disheh seconded, Mr. Elliott as a candidate.

Mr. Kellino came forward and addressed the electors. He had stated his opinions so often on public affairs, in all parts of the district, that it was unnecessary he should travel again over the same ground. He justified his conduct iv the last session for the support he had given Hie Stafford Ministry, and, if elected, he would support it again, uules3 he saw reason to do otherwise.

Mr. A. Saunders, who was in bad health, spoke ol the difficulty he found in addressing the meeting The substance of his speech, like that of his proposer, was abuse of the Ministry. The Government, lie said, were exhausting the resources of the country in squandering them away on the war ; the contracts for supplying the troops with various articles were most extravagant, and needed to be overhauled by the honest representatives of the people, as no one knew at present what money went into the pockets of the contractors, and troops could not be expected to fight when the money which should be spent upon them was wasted. The Arms Bill of the past session was such an iniquitous act, that he would oppose any Government that brought such a "bill forward, however he might agree with their other measures. The Ministry wove ruining the colony by plunging it into debt ; and was chargeable also for bringing the electors out of their harvest, fields, to come to vole, by fixing the elections at this most inconvenient season of the year, the very busiest fortnight of the whole season having been selected for them. Mr. Saunders made a personal attack on Mr. Elliott, who, he knew, had only been nominated in order that he might have a last word with the electors, and tell somo bunkum about the war.

Mr. Elliott avowed that his wish in being nominated was simply to have an opportunity of correcting the mis-statements, not perhaps made intentionally, which he was sure Mr. Saunders would indulge in. Referring first to the observation made by Mr. Horn, he showed that the disallowance of the Land Credit bill and the compensation scheme of the Provincial Council were simple acts of necessity, as neither measure would have been sanctioned by the Home Government ; that the credit system of purchasing land, had it been allowed, like lowering the price, would have increased the price to the working classes, while the whole public estate would have been made over to capitalists, who would have become gigantic landjobbers. He denied that the Government had increased the taxation of the country, while they had passed a large number of most salutary laws of a judicial, commercial, and social character, and, by preserving to the Middle Island its lund fund, had been instrumental to the progress which its provinces had made during the last few years. In reply to Mr. Saunders, he showed that the Ministry, instead of running the colony into debt, had taken measures to extricate it from debt. When they came iuto office they found an empty Treasury, and a debt exceeding £380,000, while the whole land fund of the Middle Island was impounded for North Island land purchases. By getting an authority to borrow £500,000 at four per cent, interest, and two per cent, sinking fund, they were able, by raising £430,000 to pay off all liabilities, supply the North Island with a landpurchasing fund, and leave the Middle Island land fund untouched; and of the sum thus borrowed, £10,000 must have been paid off by the sinking fund. A year ago, before the war broke out, this was all the money owed by the General Government. The war had certainly rendered it necessary to borrow more money, but this, when obtained, would be paid off in like manner by a sinking fund. The purposes for which this money was wanted were for arms and accoutrements, relief of Taranaki refugees, payments to volunteers and militia on duty, barracks, and other similar colonial expenses. The remarks about contracts were quite out of place. AH contracts for supplying troops were under the entire control of officers of the commissariat ; and the Colonial Government had nothing whatever to do with them. The charge against the Government of causing the elections to come off in the busy time of harvest was equally absurd. The Returning Officers and not the Government were to blame, if any blame was due, for fixing the elections at an inconvenient season.

Mr. Elliott having handed to the Returning Officer his resignation as a candidate, a show of hands was taken for Mr. Kelling and Mr. Saunders, and these being in favour of Mr. Saunders, a poll was demanded by Mr. Kelling. The polling will take place on Friday next, at the School-houses Richmond, Spring Grove, and Upper Wakefield.

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Bibliographic details

THE ELECTIONS. MOTUEKA DISTRICT., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XX, 30 January 1861

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1,438

THE ELECTIONS. MOTUEKA DISTRICT. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XX, 30 January 1861

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