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THE DERBY.

The Derby Day of 1860 will be remembered as one of the greatest red-letter days of the English Turf. Many circumstances combined to give the great race of the present year more than its usual interest. The late contest for the championship of the Prize Ring between an Englishman and an American had awakened strong national feelings in both nations, aud the fact that an American horse, Umpire, had stood among the foremost of the favourites for the Derby for several months, and was backed heavily to win by Brother Jonathan, imparted something of a national contest to the race also. It was pretty well understood that the field would be a large one ; it was known that it would embrace several first rate colts, and to this was added the charm of fine weather ; so, by aid of rail and road, it was computed that not less than 480,000 people congregated upon Epsom Downs on the 23rd of May last, being the largest number that ever witnessed the running for a Derby. The following description of the race is from the Field : —

The first horse wo saw stripped was Mainstone ; his good looks spoke highly in his favour, but his ugly joint justified his position in the betting. Scott's lot, from the Great Stable of the North, next appeared, ° the crack " walking first, Tom Bowline, The Eap, Cape Flyaway, and The Drone behind him. Around them the crowd pressed so closely that it was difficult to catch a glimpse. The Wizard certainly was in magnificent fettle, and more*full of muscle than nine out of ten horses in the paddock : his appearance was faultless. One of his companions one alone (The Drone) had a friend ; he was backed at outside odds, because he looked fit, and Fordham was up. The American next walked round, and went back in the betting the moment his sheets were off. They who ought to know fancied that he had been hurried in his preparation. His limbs are grand, and his legs clean as a foal's, yet we were disappointed in him ; he did not show the improvement we had been led to expect : his winter's cold, we think, has told upon him. Very different looked Horror, a magnificent horse, fit to carry 12st. to hounds, and one that any man would be induced to put his money on, as many did after seeing him. He went " like great guns." Buccaneer was botter in his coat than his legs ; the roundness below his knee was not likely to prepossess any one in bis favour, but behind the saddle he is faultless. Nutbourne walked next the paling, and was followed by all Sussex ; his powerful arms and bony hocks seemed to delight them. Our opinion was given last year that ho is a trifle heavy in the Bhoulder, still lie is entitled to be classed with the finest horses of his day. Thormanby we saw not until he cantered ; then we remembered Alice Hawthorn. Bestes looked remarkably well, and was greatly fancied as an outsider. Thormanby became a vast favourite, and was entrusted with more money than The Wizard before the moment of starting. His companion, the grey, was anxious to make a pace for him, but when the flag fell, Bentinck went up the hill at such a pace that nothing could catch him until he passed the mile-post. So fast did they go, that the tailing commenced before they had run a quarter of a mile, and at the furze beyond the Craven-post two or three were hopelessly beaten. As the stream of horses wound down the hill to Tflttenham Corner, Nutbourne appeared in great form in front, but soon afterwards he disappeared into the crowd, his fore leg having given way. Leprochaun was in a like predicament, after running forward for three-quarters of a mile. A prettier sight can scarcely be imagined than presented itself in the next half minute to the spectators in the stand. Twelve or fourteen horses were running to them abreast — yellow, blue, white, and scarlet shone in the sun like a wellselected border at a flower-show. Shouts of " The Wizard!" " The American 1" "Thormanby!" "Horror!" "The Frenchman!" rent the sky. Another moment, and "The Wizard wins!" was heard— but for a moment only. He shut up, as in his trial for the Two Thousand, as soon as he was tackled ; and "Merry wins in a canter!" succeeded those last wordB — truly were they uttered. The game Thormanby, who ran in no less than fourteen and won nine races at two years old, gave further instance of his staying qualities by winning the Derby. His owner lands, it is said, forty thousand- pounds by the event. When asked, on Tuesday, to sign a protest against Umpire, on account of age and pedigree, he replied that "he did not care if he was six years old, for he should beat him." Of Thormanby we said in our report of York Spring Meeting last year, "he is remarkably racing-like, and with length and size; from the manner of his running, and his big hocks aud arnn we think him by far the best two-year-old out." His pedigree may be traced to the never-tiring blood of Whalebone. The Deeby Stakes of 50 eovs, each, h. ft., for three-yr-olds; colts, Bst 71b ; fillies, Bst 31b. The second to receive 100 soys. out of the stakes. Last mile and a-half. 224 subs. Mr Merry's Thormanby, by Windhound, Alice Hawthorn (distance) 1 Mr NiohoFs The Wizard, by West Australian 2 Captain Christie's Horror, by "Wild Xtayrell 3 Count F. De Lagrange's Dangu, by Fitz Gladiator 4 The following also ran, but were not placed by the judges : — Mainstone, Cramond, Drone, Nutbourne, Sutton, Bentinck, Leprochaun, Sir William, Bestes, Cape Flyaway, The Bap, Wallace, The Tiger, Man-at-Arms, Buccaneer, Tom Bowline, Lanchester, Vesta, "Umpire, Brother to Bainbow, Loiterer, Largesse, Winton, The Rising Sun, Ebony, and High Treason. Betting : Bto 1 agst The Wizard, 4to 1 agst Thormanby, 5 to 1 agst Umpire, 11 to 2 agst Nutbourne, 20 to 1 agst Buccaneer, 20 to 1 agst High Treason, 25 to 1 agst The Drone, 40 to 1 agst Mainstone. After one attempt, in which Brother to Bainbow and Nutbourne were the first to be off, a capital start was effected, and Bentinck went up the hill at a great pace, Winton lying second, Tiger and Leproohaun heading the mok, with Horror, Nutbourne, The Wizard, Umpire, Thormanby, Man-at-Arms, Mainstone, and High Treason close to them, Sutton and one of Sir Joseph Hawley's being last at the milepost, where Nutbourne passed Winton, and, going up to Bentinck, immediately deprived him of the lead, and carried on the running. At Tattenham Corner ] Restes collared Nutbourne, and headed him for about a hundred yards, when Nutbourne resumed his lead. At this point Umpire was third, with Thormanby in his wake. The Tiger and Leprochaan now retired, and Horror took second place, Bestes, The Wizard, Umpire, Thormanby, and the French horse following in olose order. As they advanced up the straight at least a dozen horses were abreast of each other, Thormanby en the outside, The Wizard and Dangu in the centre, Gape Flyaway, with Winton at his girths, on the^ lower ground ; Buccaneer and Umpire on the whip-hand of the favourite, and Sir William and Mainstone about a length behind him. Nutbourne was shortly afterwards beaten, and befora reaching the distance Umpire held out the flag of distress. Shortly afterwards the front rank began to decrease, and before arriving at the stand railings The Wizard came out clear of the crowd, but in a stride or two was overhauled and passed by Thormanby, who went on in front, and won without an effort by a length and a half. Horror lost the second money by four lengths, and Dangu was a like distance from him. Bestes was fifth, Buccaneer sixth, Umpire seventh, and Sir William eighth ; next came Mainstono, Winton, and Cape Fly-away. Brother to Bainbow and High Treason headed the rear rank, at the extreme end of which were Wallace and Leprochaun, the latter walking in. Tune, from the fall of the flag (the actual start being fifty yards behind the post )2 mm. 54 sec Net value of the stakes, £6,050.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18600901.2.10.1

Bibliographic details

THE DERBY., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XIX, Issue 71, 1 September 1860

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THE DERBY. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XIX, Issue 71, 1 September 1860

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