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REPORT OF NELSON COLLEGE, FOR THE YEAR 1858.

In pursuance of the provisions contained in the Deed of Foundation, requiring a yearly statement of the accounts of Nelson College to be published, together with such other information as may show its condition and prospects, the Governors have prepared the accompanying statement and report of their proceedings during the first year of their incorporation in furtherance of the great objects of the Institution — " the advancement of religion and morality, and the promotion of useful knowledge, by offering to the youth of the province a general education of a superior character." Under the direction of the Trustees of the Nelson Trust Funds, considerable progress had been made in carrying out these objects before the control of the Institution was vested in the present Governors ; ■whose duty, therefore, became less to originate any new plans, than to maintain and carry out to com.pletion the designs of their predecessors. We found a school of forty-six scholars, with a Head and Second Master, engaged in the course of instruction pointed out by the Deed of Foundation, with the following exceptions, viz., one of the modern languages, music, and drawing. During the past year we have added what was required to complete the prescribed course ; and the French language, drawing, and vocal music now form parts of the general course of instruction ; and the progress made during the short period which has elapsed since these additional studies were introduced has been satisfactory, and creditable alike to the pupils and masters in every department of the school. The numbers at the last examination in December were thirty-seven, all of whom learnt Latin, eighteen French, thirty-four vocal music, and eighteen drawing; whilst the whole school was increasing its knowledge of English literature, geography, history, and mathematics. As, however, all the school arrangements were confessedly of a temporary character, the first care of the Governors was directed to the duty of fixing them upon a permanent basis. After much discussion, and not without a duo sense of the additional responsibilities thereby entailed on them, or of the many other considerations involved in the change, they finally determined that they would best meet the general feeling and commit the true interests of tho province, by assuming the entire control and management of the pupils, not only in the hours of study, but for the whole period of their school life ; in other words, by adopting the principle of the English Grammar Schools, which provides for the larger proportion of the scholars dwelling within the walls of the Institution, under the immediate eye and constant control of the Principal, instead of the Scotch High School system, where the duty of the master ends with the dismissal of the school. In accordance with this resolution, plans were prepared by their architect, William Beatson, Esq., of a very complete kind, and embracing every accommodation desirable; but on attempting to give practical effect to them, it was found that the limit fixed by the Deed of Incorporation for the expenditure would be exceeded. After much consultation

and rearrangement of his plans, the architect has at last prepared a design which has met with the entire approval of the Governors, one which, whilst its estimated cost is considerably within the limit, will make ample provision for the requirements of the province for the present, and probably for many years to come, and will be an ornament to the town. After much difficulty, a most excellent and commanding site has been secured, easily accessible, yet sufficiently removed from the centre of the town ; and the building operations will be proceeded with immediately. It only further remains to notice, that a change has taken place in the management of the School. The term for which engagements had been contracted with the Head Master, the Rev. J. C. Bagshaw, A.M., having expired, some fresh arrangements became necessary. The Governors had not, in their opinion, sufficiently matured their plans to make any permanent appointment, and proposed one of a provisional character. This proved unacceptable, and the Head Master sent in his resignation, tendering his services until his successor should arrive, which were accepted with thanks. Through the instrumentality of one of their own body, J. W. Saxton, Esq., who was then on his way to England, associated with D. Sclanders and H. Seymour, Esqrs., who kindly shared the duty of selection with him, the appointment of George Heppel, Esq., of St. John's College, Cambridge, has been received and confirmed by the Governors, as Principal of Nelson College. The testimonials which that gentleman has submitted to the Governors are of a veiy high description as to general ability and moral character ; and from these and the fact of his possessing the degree of M.A., and having obtained the honour of being a wrangler of the University, the Governors consider that they have secured the services of a Principal in whose hands the efficiency of the Institution will be not only maintained but advanced, and by whose co-operation they trust ultimately to be enabled to realize the views and wishes of its founders. On the eve of parting with their first Head Master/ the Rev. Mr. Bagshaw, the Council of Governors think it due to that gentleman to make public acknowledgment of the obligation which they consider he has conferred upon them by his services in organizing and conducting the Nelson College up to the present time. The duty which that gentleman undertook was one of an arduous and unsatisfactory character. He had, in fact, to construct and arrange an educational institution of a superior character in a community which had enjoyed few opportunities of instruction, and those of a desultory and superficial character. . In this task it is the opinion of the Governors that he has achieyed such an amount of success as materially to remove many of the obstacles with which his successor would otherwise have to contend. The annual statement for the year 1858 is annexed. By order of the Council of Governors. A. G. Jenkins, Secretary.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18590312.2.3

Bibliographic details

REPORT OF NELSON COLLEGE, FOR THE YEAR 1858., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XVIII, 12 March 1859

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REPORT OF NELSON COLLEGE, FOR THE YEAR 1858. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XVIII, 12 March 1859

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