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Local Intelligence.

Fibe in the Town.— Our town has once more narrowly escaped destruction by fire. Between two and three o'clock on Wednesday morning last, the back store-house of Mr. H. J. Goodman, storekeeper, of Bridge-street, was found to be in flames. The fire was first discovered, we believe, by a man named Harvey, who was sleeping in one of the cottages close to Mr! Goodman's store-house, and who was awakened by the glare of the flames. Harvey immediately gave the alarm, and aroused his neighbour, Mr. T. Goodman, and these two lost no time in calling assistance. Those of the townspeople who were aroused, immediately hastened to the spot, and by their willing assistance, in forming chains of bucket-carriers from the neighbouring wells and water casks, in deluging the burning building with water, and in quickly unroofing a shed which connected the 9tore-house with the dwelling-house, they succeeded in staying the progress of the flames, and in confining them to the building in which the ft»^ad originated. Most providentially, there was not aVeath of wind stirring, and there had been a slight fall of rain during the night ; had it been otherwise — had a smart breeze sprung up— nothing .could have Bayed the block of building* surrounding the site of the fire, and comprising tome of the best houses and stores in the town. Fortunately, also, the store-house in question (which had been originally used as a bake-house) was built princi* pally of brick, and this in some measure stayed the progress of the flames. It is estimated that Mr. Goodman has lost about £100 worth of goods, consisting chiefly of grocery stook, &c. The building was insured in the Liverpool and London Insurance Company, but the stock was un-insured. The stock included' a large quantity of Bell and Black's matches, which were packed in paper boxes ; and it is presumed that thefire originated in consequence of their being knocked off the shelf by a rat or cat, or by the Bhelf giving way, and thus causing the matches to ignite. No calamity occurs, it is said, without conveying its useful lesson ; and it is to be hoped that, while those storekeepers who keep gunpowder in stock are obliged to provide a secure and detached building for its storage, somewhat similar precautions will.in future be taken by all who keep any considerable quantity of such dangerous stock as lucifer matches.

Fibe Bell. — We are glad to find that the Board of Works have resolved to take immediate steps to procure a town alarm bell. This is a legitimate expenditure of the public money ; and if the bell iserected in a central and elevated position, it will be of service in summoning assistance in case of fire or other calamity. We understand that on the occasion of the late fire in Bridge-street, a great many persons who lived not far distant from the scene of the fire slept on in peaceful ignorance of such a danger so near them, and they regretted the circumstance, inasmuch as it prevented them from rendering their willing assistance. We hope, therefore, that no time will be lost in procuring this alarm bell, although we sincerely trust that there will be little occasion for its use when erected.

The Tasmania^ Maid. — The Bteamer arrived from from Wellington on Thursday morning without bringing the June mail, as was expected, although, while coming through Cook Strait, a vessel, bound to Wellington, and supposed to be the mail packet Jeannie Dove, was sighted by those on board the Bteamer. The Tasmanian Maid has made on this occasion, the quickest passage from Wellington she has yet accomplished, the passage from the Wellington wharf to the Napier wharf in Nelson harbour being performed in thirteen hours and twenty minutes.

Fibe Brigade. — We are happy to hear that our townfolk will not let this matter sink into oblivion, and that a meeting has been called for Tuesday next, when no doubt ihaiyr of the citizens will join the brigade, and take those Uwessary steps that will leave the town not altogether unprepared in the event of another fire.

Pakawau Coal-— We are glad to learn thafc,an arrangement has at la3t been come to by the directors of the Nelson Mining Company, and the managers ' of the Dun Mountain Copper Mining Company, by which the latter have agreed to work the .mine at Pakawau for a certain period. It is unnecessary to to publish the terms the agreement ; suffice it to say, however, Ql|fc Mr. Hackett, the manager of the Dun MountainHlompan'y, intends proceeding to Pakawau immediately** with a small staff of workmen : and we trust that the preliminary operations will be successful, and in that they may result in the raising of a suflicient supply of the really good coal that is known to exist there, in readiness for the demand for fuel that the increase of steamers on our coast will create.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18580904.2.7

Bibliographic details

Local Intelligence., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XVII, Issue 71, 4 September 1858

Word Count
822

Local Intelligence. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XVII, Issue 71, 4 September 1858

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