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Shipping Intelligence.

ARRIVED. October 9, schooner Ocean Queen, 120, Arnold, from Sydney, with 21 packages merchandize, 2 bales woolpacks, 160 bags and 2 hogsheads sugar, 52 packages merchandize, 122 camp ovens, 10 cases merchandize, 50 boxes candles, 60 cases oilman's stores, 6 packages merchandize, 7 bales stationery, 2 cases 1 truss drapery, 28 packages merchandize, Joseph and Weil ; 1 case, Rev. Mr. Bagsliaw ; 2 cases, 6 packages merchandize, Nicholson and Ridings ; 5 cases and 2 bales drapery, 155 packages merchandize, 4 trunks boots, D. Moore ; 13 packages merchandize, 1 case, J. H. Levein ; 1 case millinery, Mr. Walmsley ; 3 cases merchandize, M. Harris ; 9 bags cotton waste, Curtis, Brother ; 1 package, Mrs. Green ; 1 case saddlery, E. F. Jones ; 11 packages merchandize, 6 tierces beef, Wm. Wilson ; 2 packages merchandize, Order ; 13 packages merchandize, Order ; 3 cases drapery, D. Clarkson and Co. ; 1 bundle spades, 4 kegs nails, Captain Jenkins. Passengers — 20. Joseph and Weil, agents. — , schooner Gipsy, Williams, from Wellington, with 1 case drapery, 5 cases hardware, 1 cask meat, 2 cases oil, 2 trunks boots, 10 pieces oil cloth, 4 bales woolsacks, 2 cases sardines, 5 packages British goods (duty paid), 12 hhus. a\e, New Zealand produce. Passengers : — Mrs.Swinbourne, Mrs. Johnson, Messrs. Trelfard, J. James, W. Roberts, T. Smith, and A. Jenkins. — , brig Dart, 183, Jenkins, from Sydney, with 160 mats sugar, Daniel Moore ; 37 packages, Order j 394 packages merchandize, 26£ tons coal, Joseph and Weil ; 5 casks, 1 case, 2 bales, N. Edwards and Co. ; 56 packages' sundries, 6 packages printing materials, William Nation ; 15 packages merchandize, William Wilson ; 2 boxes jewellery, 1 box watches, Jos. H. Levien ; 1 case printing materials, 3 trunks boots, 582 packages and 1 case merchandize, Order. Passengers 1 —Mr. Nation, Mrs. Nation, Misses Mary, Eliza, and Sarah Nation, Mr. S. Woodward, Mrs. Wood ward, Mr. Jackson, Mrs. Jackaon, Messrs. Lightband, Jordan, Nation, Miss Jane Nation, 36 in steerage; and 1 cabin and 2 steerage passengers for Port Cooper. CLEARED OrTWARDS. October 8, schooner Sarah, RocLfort, for Motueka, with 1 case dials. COLLINGWOOD. ARRIVED. September 27, Phoebo, Flight, from Wellington, with 1 ton cheese (New Zealand produce) j 27 passengers. 29, Tasmanian Maid, Whitwell, from Nelson ; 18 passengers. — , Sarah, Rochfort, from Riwaka, with 8,000 feet timber (New Zealand produce). 29, Shepherdess, Scott, from Wellington via Nelson ; 14 passengers. 30, Wonga Wonga, Kennedy, from Wellington, with 1 quarter-cask rum, 1 truss drapery, 2 kegs nails (British and foreign goods, duty paid), 1 cask oil (New Zealand produce) ; 14 passengers. — , Ta3manian Maid, Whitwell, from Nelson ; 41 passengers. SAILED. September 27, Necromancer, Cribb, for Waitapu. 28, Mary Jane, Ardley, for Manawatu. 29, Tasinanian Maid, Whitwell, for Nelson j 12 passengers. — , Shepherdess, Scott, for Wellington. — , Jane Peata, Mortimer, for Taranaki ; 6 passengers. — , Elizabeth, Frazer, for Motueka.

October 1, Wonga Wonga, Kennedy, for Wellington ; 30 passengers. — , Tasmanian Maid, Whitwell, for Nelson. 2, Phoobc, Flight, for Wnnganui ; 5 passengers. — , Sarah, Eochforfc, for Eiwaka.

The Louis and Miriam has had a very bad weather passage from New Zealand, as will be seen from the following extract, furnished us by Captain Hays, who was a passenger by her: — "Friday, September 4. This 24 hours commences with fresh breezes from northward, and clear weather, all sail set to the westward. At 3 p.m. : Increasing breezes, in two reefs of topsails, wind hauling to the westward. 6 p.m. : Ditto, ditto, barometer falling. 8 p.m. : Strong gales, with heavy squalls and confused sea, in mainsail and jib, and close reefed the topsails. 9 p.m. : Handed the foresail, wore ship, to W.N.W. Midnight : Increasing gales, split main-topsail and fore-topsaiL furled them, and hove ship to under close-reefed main topsail. Pump 3 constantly attended. 4 a.m. ; Ditto ditto. 5 a.m. : A heavy eea struck her on the port bow, carrying the galley overboard, starting part of the bulwarks, and slaving the long boat. 6 a.m. : With the violent lurching of the vessel, shifted the boats, spare anchors, spars, studding saih, &c, to leeward, causing her to list over very much, when it was deemed advisable for the safety of the vessel to throw all overboard, which was done, but the ship still labouring heavily, commenced throwing cargo overboard, about ten tons, which made her easier, but still labouring and straining violently. 8 a.m. : Heavy squalls from the S.W., with a tremendous heavy cross sea. Noon : Ditto ditto ; no observation. September 5, commenced with heavy gales and terrific squalls from S.W., with a confused sea ; battened down fore scuttle and cabin skylights; barometer very low ; ship hove to under close-reefed maintopsail. Midnight : Ditto ditto. 3 a.m. : A heavy sea broke on board, throwing the ship on her beam ends, carrying away all the stanchions, bulwarks, and covering board from the cathead on the port side aft to main rigging, and washing overboard fore scuttles, two casks of water, and everything movable on deck 5 large quantities of water poured down the forecastle and cabin, which, settling to leeward, with great difficulty the ship Tightened. All hands to the pumps, four ieet water in the well. Carpenter employed nailing canvass over covering-board to prevent water from pouring into the hold. 7 a.m.: The pumps , sucked, and having succeeded in stopping the leak on deck with canvas and oakum, kept the ship away, before the wind, in order to open the fore hatchway, and commenced throwing cargo overboard off the starboard side, to trim her upright. Threw overboard ten tons. Noon : Heavy gales, with a tremendous sea rnnning. All hands employed securing the spritsail yard and jib Doom while the ship is before the wind. Pumps constantly attended. Barometer still very low. No obvervation. On the 2nd instant spoke the Lady Leigh, of Hobart Town, five months out, clean : j desires to be reported. — Sydney Morning Herald.

A Parallel Case to that of the Dukb4r. — The following extract, which we take from a late English journal, will not be perused without interest : the several circumstances attending the wreck it records, the cause thereof, as also the time of the occurrence, and the position and working of the vessel, all bearing a Striking similarity to the case of the Dunbar: — " Total Loss of the Sea King near Holyhead. — This fine ship, bound to Liverpool from Calais, was totally lost, during a thig fog on Monday night, in Carnarvon Bay, about eight miles from Holyhead. She had called at Cork for orders, and left that port on Saturday evening for the Mersey. About 7, p. in., Wicklow Head, bearing about N.W., was seen some 18 or 20 miles distant. The ship was then kept off to the eastward, to make Holyhead Light, and the distance, by log, brought her near the Head by 11 o'clock. It was thought that the ship had a good berth off the coast. About a quarter-past 11, a light was observed on the port bow ; immediately after, another light was seen on the starboard bow, which was supposed to be the South Slack light. In the course of ten minutes the land was reported right ahead. The helm was at once put up, and the ship, in wearing round, struck a reef of rocks. Being a flood tide she got off, but unshipped her rudder. The anchor wa3 then dropped, and she rode safely for a short time, but as the tide fell she began to strike on a sunken rock, and she gradually filled and settled down, her cargo (guano) washing out. She has become a total wreck." [The Sea King was a ship of 1,400 tons, and formerly in the trade between London and Melbourne.]

Wreck of the Dunbar. — We understand that, although no steps have, so far as we can learn, yet been taken to carry out the intention, that the Government have it in contemplation to erect a monument over the remains of the unfortunate persons whose bodies were recovered subsequent to the late dreadful shipwreck. It will bt remembered that such bodies as were identified and claimed, were handed over for burial to relatives and friends, but that the greater number, many being unrecognised, were interred together in one grave, in the Camperdown Cemetery. At present, a huge square mound of earth, is all that serves to mark their last vesting-place. We have no doubt the suggestion for raising a tomb over their remains is one which will meet with the hearty approval of every member of the community. It is but fitting and Chvistian-like that such a monument should be raised, as it will record at once the public sympathy which was manifested on the occasion, and the circumstances of the catastrophe by which these unfortunate people perished. There is a precedent, moreover, for the Government acting as is proposed in this matter. We allude to the course taken by Sir Richard Bourke's Government many years ago, with regard to the remains recovered from the wreck of the Charles Eaton, lost in Torres Straits. These remains, over ivhich a massive tomb was raised, were recovered aftei diligent search, and interred at the public co3t. We believe, too, that a similar tribute of respect was pail by Mr. LaTrobe, at Port Phillip, to the memory of .he " four hundred and fourteen " ill-fated persons who perished by the wreck of the immigrant ship Cataraqui, in 1843 or 1844.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18571010.2.3

Bibliographic details

Shipping Intelligence., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XVL, 10 October 1857

Word Count
1,548

Shipping Intelligence. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XVL, 10 October 1857

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