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MOTUEKA ELECTION.

The nomination of a member to represent the Motueka and Massacre Bay district in the General Assembly took place on Wednesday last. The writ having been read by A. Le G. Campbell, Esq., the deputy Returning Officer,

Captain Fearon proposed E. D. Salisbury, Esq. as a fit and proper person to represent the district. He said that upon all the important subjects likely to come under the consideration of the Assembly, his friend Mr. Salisbury held the same opinions as himself. His ability, social virtues, and position entitled him to the confidence of the electors, and it might in the opinion of many add to his qualifications, that he had represented a large constituency in the British House of Commons.

Mr. W. Giblin seconded the nomination.

Mr. Askew proposed Mr. Parker. His services as a member of the Provincial Council entitled him to the confidence of the constituency.

Mr. Jennings seconded the nomination of Mr. Parker.

Mr. Mackenzie proposed Mr. Jennings. His abilities entitled him to the position.

Mr. W. Coppins seconded the nomination.

Mr. Salisbury said, that he felt greatly the honour which had been conferred upon him, in bringing him forward for so important a position as a candidate to represent the Motueka and Massacre Bay Districts in the General Assembly. His opinions coincided with those of their late lamented representative, Mr. Picard. As a stranger he was not yet fully au fait to all the necessities of the district, but he was not too old to learn. He could at least say, that his interests were identical with those of the constituency amongst whom he had settled and was likely to spend the remainder of his days.

Mr. Parker said that Mr. Salisbury had not enlightened them much as to his political opinions. His own were well known, ne was anxious to see vote by ballot introduced, and would endeavour to secure it. He was anxious to see the high standing that Motueka had assumed in the first Assembly maintained in the next, and had consented to come forward as a candidate.

Mr. Jennings said that he was an advocate for local self-government to the fullest extent, and would endeavour to secure it. He would do all in his power to further the interests of the district, and of the province at large. He trusted that his opinions, which were well known to the constituency, would entitle him to their support. Many questions were then put to the several candidates, after which, a show of hands being taken, the election was declared to have fallen upon Mr. Salisbury. The other candidates demanded a poll.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18551027.2.7

Bibliographic details

MOTUEKA ELECTION., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XIV, Issue 61, 27 October 1855

Word Count
439

MOTUEKA ELECTION. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XIV, Issue 61, 27 October 1855

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