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WRECK OF LOVELL'S CUTTER.

A small cutter of about twenty tons belonging to an industrious settler at Massacre Bay, of the name of Lovell. was wrecked on Sunday night last, a little beyond the mouth of the harbour. The cutter was from Pakawau, laden with coal intended chiefly for the Ann steamer, to take to Sydney as a sample of our fuel. The night was exceedingly dark and foggy, so that as the cutter approached the harbour the usual land marks could not be discerned, and in consequence, she ran ashore outside the Boulder Bank, nearly abreast of the coal shed now erecting there. When the vessel struck an attempt was made to get her off again into deep water, but it was discovered she had received too much damage to be trusted afloat, for on going below, two feet of water was found in the cabin. Including the crew, there were eight persons on board when the cutter struck, and by the aid of the dingy four of these reached the Boulder Bank, but on returning to the

wreck, the boat, with one man m her, was swept away with the tide up the Waimea river, where he effected a landing belowthe house formerly built by Mr. Thompson. The persons landed on the Boulder Bank succeeded in making themselves heard by the. Pilot across the mouth of the harbour, and immediate assistance was given to those left on the wreck, as well as those on the island, that no life was, lost, but we are sorry to say the little vessel, the fruits of many months toil to her owner, became an entire wreck, and all the cargo was also lost.

Some blame seems attributable to the authorities that the boat light at the Port was not burning on the occasion, which, had it been lighted, would have shown the position of the vessel. We are told that the light has not been burnt for several weeks in consequence of the absence of oil in the settlement, but surely for such a purpose, a quantity should always be kept on hand sufficient to guard against the possibility of the supply being altogether exhausted. For want of this precaution property to the value of at least £300 has been lost, and eight lives placed in great jeopardy.

While speaking of this wreck, we may observe that the losses which arise to the owners of our coasting craft, from the occasional wreck of their vessels, might be guarded against by a local insurance company. The machinery for such a company is very simple, and we think materials for it might be found here.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18530917.2.14

Bibliographic details

WRECK OF LOVELL'S CUTTER., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XII, Issue 602, 17 September 1853

Word Count
442

WRECK OF LOVELL'S CUTTER. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XII, Issue 602, 17 September 1853

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