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This church, which has been erected partly by subscription, aHd partly by the Church Endowment Fund of the settlement, at a cost of about £800, was opened for Divine secvice on Sunday morning last by the Bishop of New Zealand. His lordship took for his text, James v., T, and in the course of an eloquent and impressive discourse, showed the difficulties which had stood in the way of building a suitable church in the settlement at an earlier period. The building was very crowded, and was supposed to have contained about 600 hearers. In the evening, the Rev. F. H. Butt preached also to a crowded congregation from Galatians vii., 2, and after each service a collection was made in aid of the Building Fund, which realized £25. The best feeling, we are glad to say, was shown by both the Presbyterians and Wesleyans on the occasion, for the places of worship belonging to these bodies were closed for the day, to enable the respective congregations to join in worship with their Episcopalian brethren. The church is a neat wooden building in the early English style, of the form of a cross, but forty feet has yet to be added to its length to complete the design. It will at present accommodate from 300 to 400 sitters. The north window contains a piece of stained glass, presented to the Building Committee by Mr. Campbell.

A Boat, a Cloak, \n Umbrella, and a Walking-stick. — At a recent meeting of the Humane Society, Mr. Oliveira called the attention of the Society to a new boat, invented by Lieutenant Halkett, R.N. It was so constructed that it served the purpose of a cloak when not inflated, or it might be carried in a small parcel weighing only seven pounds and a half. It could be inflated in three minutes and a half, and would support six or eight persons. In tome recent experiments tried it had been found impossible to aink or overturn it, although filled with water and holding six persons. A paddle, capable of being used as a walkingstick, could be used in propelling it; or a small portable sail, which would alio serve the purpose of an unjbrella. Chloroform.^' Propelling Power. — Experiments with chloroform as a propelling power, in the place of steam, are now tnaking in the port of Lurient ; and there is reaton to hope, from the success which has already attended them, they will result in causing a considerable saving to be effected in cost, &c.

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OPENING OF CHRIST CHURCH. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume X, Issue 577, 20 December 1851

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