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LAYING THE FOUNDATION STONE OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

On Thursday week, the foundation stone of the first Presbyterian Church in the settlement of Nelson, was laid on the south side of Nil* Street East, by the Rev. T. D. Nicholson, minister of the congregation. The building is to be of wood, on a brick foundation, in the Elizabethian style, and will be both neat and substantial, and is intended to accommodate about 350 persons. A large concourse of persons were present intending the ministers of the Episcopalian, the Methodist, and the German Lutheran Churches who each addressed the meeting in .the most liberal and Christian spirit. The Rev. T. D. Nicholson in an eloquent address, said that the duty laid upon him that day by the adherents of the Presbyterian Church in Nelson, would continue to live among the number or his grateful recollections. In presenting himself before them, it was in no Spirit of^sectarianism for the prayer of his heart was. "Grace be with all those who love the Lord Jesus." Though he confessed to loving his own communion best, he yet loved the whole brotherhood of Chnst, and rejoiced that he saw exhibited there that day such a beautiful illustration of brotherly love and Christian chanty. It was not the way in Apostolic time* that every Church should look on its own things, and not on the things of others; and with them the primitive spirit had that day been revived, for the meeting had listened tothe warm addresses of the Episcopalian, Wesleyan, and Lutheran ministers. Difference of sect and denomination was of small moment compared with the life of God in the soul, and that new name which is written upon every servant of Christ j and if any love not Christ it matters nothing whether he be called Episcopalian, Lutheran, Wesleyan, or Presbyterian. The rev. gentleman said, that he loved his own Church, and surely Presbyterians might be allowed to have a preference for the communion to which they belonged. They need not ba ashamed of Presbyterianism. Contrast the state of England in vital religion in the Puritan times, and after the restoration of Charles 11, and the ejection of the two thousand Nonconformists—contrast the present state of Presbyterian Ulster with any other province of Ireland— contrast the state of Scotland with any other country of Europe, and every friend of bible instruction, of sabbath observance, of true religion, ought to rejoice in the prospect of extending Presbyterianism. It was lawful, it was also expedient, on a day like that, to speak to Scotchmen of their native land. He loved Scotland— he loved his Jand because it was his own. Scotchmen in other lands, rich and sunny though they be, cannot forget the home of their sires, nor the last view of its rocky shores. They need not be ashamed of their comparatively barren country, and its ungenial climate. Scotland had proved the nurse of many adventurous 6ons, whose conduct, talents, and renown in other parts of the world, reflect honour on the land of their birth. It was expected of Scotchmen by their country, that they would do their duty— that they would be distinguished among the natives of other lands for their high moral bearing, their honest and persevering industry, their sobriety and verity, and for th«ir habitual reverence fox God and the things of God. Presbyterian Scotland had shown that living faith [and high principle are yet to be found on the earth, as in former times, when her children's blood was shed like water, when from many a bloody scaffold and from many a gallows tree she witnessed a noble testimony for the truth of God and the cause of Christ, confirmed and sealed by the blood of her best and truest sons and daughters. Revered be their memory and name, and may the rude tablets in the glens and on the mountains of Scotland point out to future generations the last resting-place of their martyred forefathers. Let us (said the rev. gentlsman) arise, then, and build our bouse of prayer, in the name of the Lord —our temple for the worship and service of Almighty God ; and let us at the same time remember, " Except the Lord build the house, they labour in vain that build it." May the gospel Jof our salvation continue to be proclaimed within the edifice which shall be built on the foundation stone now to be laid through the mercy of our God. May glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace and good will to men be preached here. And may truth, peace, and charity take up their abode within its walls. " For my brethren and companions' sakes I will now say, Ptace be within thee, because of the house of the Lord our God, I will seek thy good." The minister then exhibited a bottle, containing the following documents, which he was about to place underneath the foundation stone:— Names of the Minister, Trustees, and Subscribers to the Building Fund. " Report of the Colonial Committee :" Free Church of Scotland, 1848. New Zealand EvangeUit, February, 1849. "Brief Hints addressed to the Adherents of the Presbyterian Church." NeUm Examiner for 27th January, 1849? containing the Statistics of the settlement. "The Desolation of Jerusalem," by Rev. T. D Nicholson. Various coins. ' The following was then read as a true copy of one of the above documents : — *• ' Search the Scriptures.' "•Trinity Presbyterian Church,' Nelson. (" Nee tamen eontunubatur.) "The Foundation Stone of this, the first Presbyterian Church in the settlement of Nelson, was laid on Thursday, February 22d, 1849, by the Rev. Thomas Dicluon Nicholson. "Minister — The Rev. Thomas D. Nicholson. Sent out by the Free Church of Scotland, and , arrived at Nelson on the 18th day of June, 1849.

" Eiders — To be elected next month (March). " Trustees — Messrs. D. Sclanders, T. Renwick, M.D., W. Rogerson, W. Wilkie, W. Gardner, Rev. T. D. Nicholson, J. Mackay, G. M'Rae, R. D. M'lsaac, and A. Hankin. "Presbyterian Ministers in New Zealand — Rev. Thomas D. Nicholson, Nelson ; Rev. Thomas Btirns, Dunedin, Otago; Rev. George Panton, Auckland : sent out by the Free Church of Scotland. Rev. John Inglis, Wellington; Rev. J. Duncan, Manawatu: sent out by the Reformed Church ia Scotland. " The standards of this Church are, the Confession of Faith, and the Catechisms, prepared by the Westminster Assembly of Divines. And this Church adheres to the Free Church of Scotland in her primitive mode of worship, to the testimony of the martyrs who have laid down their lives in defence of her fundamental principles, and for the preservation of her ancient and her noble constitution. And may God grant that no spostacy shall ever arise in this Church from any one doctrine which bears either upon the Cross or the Crown of the Divine Redeemer. " This building would have been of brick, instead of wood, but for the warning given us of the insecurity of brick buildings, by the earthquakes of October, 1848. " Building Committee — Messrs. D. Moore, M. Campbell, W. Dartnall, and J. Watts. "Architect— W, Dartnall. " Builder — Thomas Bright. "Superintendent and Resident Magistrate of Nelson — Mathew Richmond, Esq." The Btone was then laid with all doe solemnity, after which the meeting broke up. In the evening, a very large Tea Party took place in the erection lately put up for the annual examination of the scholars belonging to the Nelson School Society ; after which many of the company adjourned to the adjoining Schoolroom, where several addresses were delivered, calculated to cement the feeling of brotherhood which had been exhibited during the day.

Stcah Communication to Australia and New Zealand. — The beginning of the year 1849, which ia now fast approaching, will be distinguished in the history of this country as the period when a steam communication by way of Egypt and India was established between 'Great Britain and our vast colonies in Australasia. For some months past powerful and well-appointed steamers have been leaving Southampton Water, and wending their way to the Indian Ocean, prepared to convey, or to supply the place of those which may be appointed to convey, mails between Singapore and New South Wales. The gradual progress and extension of steam navigation in the East, from Egypt to India, and from India to China, almost prevent us from estimating the magnificent enterprise which is now about to be completed, In five weeks' time the Government will have entered into contract, probably with one single steam navigation company, for the conveyance of mails eastward for upwards of twelve' thousand miles. Very shortly a letter posted in England, will be delivered ii» about two months afterwards at the antipodes. The ends of the earth may then be said to be united, and the most distant countries known or dreamt Of by the ancient world will only be as resting-places for travellers during a rapid flight across the globe. When the extent and unrivalled fertility af Australia is considered, as well as the suitability of its climate for Englishmen, and the almost exclusive possession of its territory by the English nation, one cannot avoid looking to that country mainly for relief from the overwhelming increase of our population. The establishment, therefore, of a rapid postal communication between the two countries is a matter of primary and immeasurable importance, and, when accomplished, must be attended with beneficial results. It is the want of this, in a great measure, that has hitherto limited the number of emigrants to Australia, and confined emigration to those colonies, in a considerable degree, to the lowest portion of the working classes.- Hitherto, the long and irregular period occupied in the transmission of correspondence between this country and our most distant possessions, has discouraged those from emigrating whose affections have not been blunted by want or poverty. They have known that they would be perpetually harrassed by fear and anxiety about friends and relatives from whom they were separated. But when a postal communication, rapid, frequent, and regular, is established, distance from friends will not be so severely felt. The poorest classes also, finding those above their own rank, whom they have known in this country, disposed to emigrate, and to whom they could look up to in a distant land for either employment, assistance, or protection, will be less unwilling than they now are to leave a place, where both food and labour are scarce, for a spot where they are abundant. Persons of rank, wealth, and influence will shortly be enabled to visit our most distant colonies, and contribute also in some degree to lessen the dislike of emigration. The comforts and luxuries enjoyed on board large and well-appointed steamers, induce wealthy individuals to extend their travels, and in a short time hence persons possessed of money and leisure will be able to pass by the shores of India and China to view the wonders of another hemisphere, without consuming more time or experiencing greater inconvenience than used to be occupied and felt in a summer cruise to the Mediterranean. In a few weeks two lines of steam navaigation will be found branching off eaat and west from this country. The one to Che east will, by means of a branch steamer from Sydney, extend from Southampton to New Zealand, and the other to the west, extending also from Southampton through the Mexican Gulf to the borders of the Pacific Ocean : and at no distant day perhaps *n ocean pathway will be formed which will be formed which will extend around the globe, and be only broken by the Isthmus of Snez and that of Panama. It is consolatory to reflect that, while other nations are fighting for social existence, and preventing an excess of population by fratricidal war, we are bridging over the immensity of the ocean to encourage clamorous and discontented multitude* to fly to a hind of exuberant plenty ; and that, instead of slaughtering men at the barricades, we are enabling them to build up a mighty empire in a distant land, in which they can enjoy every political and social bUuiug.—Daity Newt, Oct. 5.

LATEST DATES OP NEWSPAPERS BECEIVED. London Nor. 8 Auckland Jut. as lydney Jan. 10 Pott Nicholson. ... Feb. 14 Adelaide Not. IS HobartTown ....Nor. 33 fart Phillip Not. 24 Launce»ton Not. 8

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LAYING THE FOUNDATION STONE OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume VIII, Issue 365, 3 March 1849

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LAYING THE FOUNDATION STONE OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume VIII, Issue 365, 3 March 1849

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