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AUCKLAND.

We last week received Auckland papers to the 16th of June, from which we learn that, by a decision in the Supreme Court, all the purchases of land under Captain Fitzßoy's noted proclamations have been upset. A case (one of the strongest) was selected to try the validity of these purchases. Under the penny-an-acre proclamation, it appears that a Mr. M'lntosh bought of the natives a certain island in the Frith of the Thames, and completely extinguished the native title by satisfying all the claims of the natives. Subsequently Captain Grey, by a Crown grant, conveyed the same island to Mr. J. J. Symonds, whereupon Mr. M'lntosh moved that the Crown grant should be set aside, it having been issued to the prejudice of his legal right. The Attorney- General appeared for Mr. Symonds, and Mr. Bartley for Mr. M'lntosh. The Chief Justice deferred judgment until he had communicated with Mr. Justice Chapman, and on the 9th June his honour, after reading the judgment of the latter against the validity of the purcnase from the natives, gave his own judgment on the same side. By this decision, which directly affects so large a number of the people in the north, all the so-called purchases under Captain Fitzßoy's proclamations are utterly void. As might be expected, it has caused the greatest consternation in Auckland; for those who thought they possessed many a broad acre, the fancied right to which they in many instances bad obtained for a mere song, now find they have not a shadow of right to them.

A subscription to build a Presbyterian Church in Auckland, amounted in the first week to £1,235 15s.

A savings bank has been established in Auckland, which promises to be well supported both by Europeans and natives.

Government is employing a large body of natives in repairing the roads, but much additional labour is apparently required from the manner in which the roads were originally laid out. Instead of following the natural levels of the country, they appear, like some of our own, to have been laid out on paper, in defiance of all obstacles which the broken nature of the country presents.

The New Zealander strongly advises both natives and Europeans not to trust too much to the potato crop next year, lest the disease which this plant has been visited with elsewhere should extend to this colony.

A native chief, named Jabez Bunting, has addressed a letter to the editor of the Times, in reply to a letter from Captain Rous, late M.P. for Westminster, published in that journal, in which the writer made some foolish, unfounded statement respecting Captain Grey's conduct towards the natives. The letter of Bunting denies the truth of Captain Rous's statements, and cautions him against believing implicitly in the "lying letters" sent home from New Zealand.

The Government Gazette states that the Governor has the most convincing proofs that some of the inhabitants of Auckland are still in the constant habit of selling arms and ammunition to the natives.

The foundation-stone of a new Wesleyan chapel was laid in Auckland on the 28th of May, by the Rev. W. Lawry.

The New Zealander strongly urges the Government to establish a regular steam communication between Auckland and the southern settlements by way of Manakau. This would bring Wellington and Nelson within two days' journey of Auckland, and Taranaki one day.

Clerical disoualification extraordinary. —It is stated by a correspondent of the Times, that the Bishop of London has refused to receive a clergyman into his diocese, on the ground of his being ao Irish clergyman. The prejudice against poor Paddy seems to be increasing. Perhaps we shall have the Sishop advertising for a curate, after the manner of a publican in want of a potboy, with the notification — " No Irish need apply." — Punch.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18470710.2.3

Bibliographic details

AUCKLAND., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume VI, Issue 279, 10 July 1847

Word Count
638

AUCKLAND. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume VI, Issue 279, 10 July 1847

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