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CORRESPONDENCE.

To thi Editor of the Nelson Examinkb.

Sib — We have noticed with pleasure, and the public must have observed it too, the orderly conduct of the crew of the American whaling ship Peruvian, and feel ourselves bound to express our approbation of it, especially as such decorum is the result of Temperance principles. We are happy also to state, on behalf of the Temperance Committee, that at the request of the officers of the Peruvian, we held a Temperance Meeting in the cabin of that ship on the evening of the 4th, to which the crew were summoned, at the close of which seven of them signed the abstinence pledge. The meeting was concluded by the crew singing in hearty style two Temperance songs. Jabez Packer, sec. T. S. March 5. For the Temperance Committee.

Potato Crop. — A correspondent of the Morning Post gives a sad account of the state of the potato crop in Wiltshire. In almost every direction the plant has more or less failed; in some places as much as three-fourths of the roots are diseased. After the potatoes have been dug up a few days, many turn rotten that appeared sound at first. Turnips and other edible root 6 have also suffered. The prospect for the poor labourers, who depended much on their potato-grounds, is represented as very bad indeed. The Liverpool Times reports — " Hopes were entertained by many parties that new varieties of the potato might be raised from foreign seed, which would be free from this disease ; but we learn from Mr. Skirving, tbat of twenty-five foreign varieties grown by him in his nursery-grounds at Walton, not one has escaped. The sorts tried by Mr. Skirving were brought from every part of Europe and America; and after so entire a failure, in the hands of so skilful a cultivator as he is universally allowed to be, we fear tbat the prospect of renewing the crop from foreign 6eed is very slight." The three spacious parks provided for the recreation of the inhabitants of Manchester, were inaugurated with great pomp on August 22d, which was observed as a holyday ; and this enabled vast bodies of working men to swell the throng and take part in the rejoicings. The municipal authorities started from the Town-hall in gay procession of equipages ; bands of music performed ,• and from the windows and balconies variegated banners, bearing appropriate inscriptions, waved. The Peel Park, containing thirty-two acres, was named by Mr. W. B. Watkins, the Mayor of Manchester; the Earl of Ellesmere, who had engaged to officiate, being unable to attend. Mr. Watkins, in addressing the vast assemblage, stated that no fewer than five thousand working persons had. contributed to the Park fund j and alluded to the manner in which they had been backed by their wealthy neighbours, as practically refuting the reproach that the manufacturing and mercantile classes were actuated by the sole desire to accumulate wealth without caring for the sufferings or enjoyments of their poorer neighbours. The Queen's Park was named by Mr. Mark Phillips, one of the members of the borough; and the Phillips Park, named in honour of Mr. Phillips, was christened by Mr. Entwisle, one of the members for South Lancashire. Death of Attila. — This celebrated racer, the winner of the Derby, 1842, died recently at the Messrs. Tatteraall's, Hyde Park Corner. He had been let daring the present season to Monsieur Lupin, to improve the breed of horses in France. His engagement having terminated, he was sent to Boulogne, where he was shipped for London. Whilst at sea heavy weather came on, and the horse became extremely restless, kicking and plunging violently; so much so, indeed, that the box in which he was placed was nearly shattered to pieces. At last he was found lying on his back, severely injured, and on being taken ashore died. — English paper.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18470306.2.6

Bibliographic details

CORRESPONDENCE., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume VI, Issue 261, 6 March 1847

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646

CORRESPONDENCE. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume VI, Issue 261, 6 March 1847

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