Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

LATEST ENGLISH INTELLIGENCE.

By Hobart Town papers of the sth of January, we have English news to the 14th o" September.

The Queen had returned from her visit to the King of the French, and had set out to pay a similar visit to the King of the Belgians, at Ostend.

The repeal agitation is still exciting the greatest interest in England as w»11 as in Ireland. A large meeting had been held at Liverpool, at which considerable disturbance took place. The Doncaster St. Leger was won by Nutwith, an outsider, against whom there were bets 100 to 7 ; Cotherston ran second by a head ; Prizefighter third. The odds were 6to 4on Cotherston; 6 to 1 against Prizefighter. 127 subscribers — -'stakes, £3,100. A new College is about to be established at Littlemore, near Oxford, in which young men holding tractarian views may be educated for missionary labours. The Right Rev. Dr. Coleridge, late Bishop of Barbadoes, is to be principal. The Grampus United States war schooner had foundered at sea; all lives lost. Trade is looking up slowly, but steadily, in America. There has been a sort of counter revolution in Spain. The present Ministry is even more unpopular than the Regency. The Principe regiment had mutinied, and several of the mutineers had been shot. Several of the juntas are only able to maintain their authority by proclaiming all who resist it enemies to their country, and that they shall suffer death. Espartero's friends entertain new hopes from his reception in England. The French alliance is as much disliked under the new rule as under the JRegcncy. General Prim, the late darling

of Barcelona, was firing on the town, which had revolted from his authority. Meantime, Espar* tero had been graciously received by the Queen of England, and feted by the Lord Mayor of London.

An insurrection had broken out in Hayti. An attempt was made to apprehend some negroes, who resisted and were joined by others, until their numbers amounted to 600 well armed men, who encamped at Aujc Cayes. The circumstance that General Reviere was at the east, while Aux Cayes is on the extreme south, renders the insurrection more formidable. Every preparation was made by the British merchants to embark on board the vessels in the harbour.

The riots in Wales still continue unabated. Murder has been added to the other atrocities. A poor old woman, upwards of 70 years old, kept a gate near Contandulais, on the road from Llanelly. On the 10th of September the house was set on fire over her head — she ran to beg her neighbours to assist in putting out the fire and save ber furniture — they refused from fear. She returned to save it by herself; they fired the house more effectually. She ran across the road and shouted, imprudently, that she knew them. One fired, and she fell. An inquest was held ; her chest was full of blood, shots were found in her lungs, clearly the cause of her death. The jury returned a verdict — " That the deceased died from effusion of blood into the chest, which caused suffocation ; but from what cause is to this jury unknown." The reporter of the Times says — " I shall, of course, make no comment upon this extraordinary verdict."

There seems to be no doubt that the toll gates are a grevious injustice on the Welch roads. Two shillings are required on one road for eleven miles ; the tolls in some cases are more than the value of the goods carted, and on one road there has been paid in seven years £600 tolls, while not more than £3 has been expended during that period, and the road is in wretched repair.

During a dreadful storm at Monte Video, on the 24th and 25th June, H.M.S. Fantome, 16 guns, commanded by Captain Hyams, was totally lost. All the crew were saved, and on their way to England to stand a court martial.

Departure of the King of Hanover. — His Majesty, who was welcomed to England on the 2d June, took his leave on the 2d September. Before nine o'clock his domestics were assembled at Kew Green, and the King blessed them, and bade them adieu. His Majesty came to St. James' at ten, and before noon departed on board the Dover packet for Hamburg.

The Storm. — Almost all the country papers allude to the severe storm of Wednesday week (August 19), which appears to have been felt in almost every quarter of the country. The electric discharges were frequent and vivid. In many parts of the country the fall of rain was frequent and heavy. Serious losses have been sustained by the holders of property in the Bedford level. In the fens alone upwards of 2,000 acres of the hay crop, of the value of at least £10,000, has been totally destroyed, and the pasturage of 1,000 head of cattle is entirely inundated. The consequence of this sad disaster is, that about 1,000 persons, men, women, and children, have been thrown out of employment. On Wednesday last (eight days after the former storm), the thunder and lightning returned, accompanied with tremendous floods of rain. Bright sunshine afterwards broke out, followed by a light fog as thick as those of December, but dewy and genial, which continued to noon on Thursday. The estimated damage done to property in the towns of Rochester, Chatham, Stroud, and Brompton, during the short duration of the awful thunder-storm, was about £6,000.

Sir C. Metcalfe, after a tour of the provinces, had returned to Montreal. The crops in Canada were abundant. There was a considerable falling off in emigration; up to the 19th of August there had arrived in Quebec only 18,131, in the former year 38,159. An account of the wreck of the Regular, East Indiaman, which we announced some time since, had been received at home. It will be remembered that the crew were saved by the French frigate Cleopatra. Likewise of the Queen Victoria, East Indiaman, 715 tons, off the Island of Rodrigues. Most of the passengers with the captain saved, but eleven were lost

Drinking. — It is an uncouth and strang thing, and even unnatural, that neither a man's appetite, nor his health, nor the time of the day, nor his ordinary diet, shall be the reason or occasion of a man's drinking or the rule whereby to try the convenient when or season of it : but whenever a man shall make such and such a bargain with me, or pay me for, or get payment from me of such and such things, that must be the rule of my eating and drinking! What beast waold be thus dealt with? There is a drinking of healths — by this means forcing, tempting, or occasioning drinking in others: this is one of the highest provocations to drunkenness. What can be the use of drinking healths? It was a notable saying of a great man, solicited to drink the king's health. 'By your leave I will pray for the king's health and drink my own.' This practice will probably be found to have arisen from heathen idolaters, who used libamen Jove, Bacchus, &c.; it is certain there is no vestige for it in Christianity, nor any reason for it. — The Rev. Mr. Durham on the Ten Commondmentt.

The PABKHoasT Boys. — Eighteen of the boys engaged in the assault upon their overseers at New Town, as described in our last, have been returned to the road-gang ; and the other fourteen who were most active in die disturbance have been sentenced to 'various periods of confinement, varying from two yean to Port Arthur, to a month's punishment on the treaxtanilL — Hobart Town Advertiter* j

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18440203.2.11

Bibliographic details

LATEST ENGLISH INTELLIGENCE., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume II, Issue 100, 3 February 1844

Word Count
1,284

LATEST ENGLISH INTELLIGENCE. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume II, Issue 100, 3 February 1844

Working