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COLONIAL INTELLIGENCE.

We have received files of Sydney papers to the 23d ult. They contain no intelligence of an important nature. We subjoin a few extracts : —

Thb Floods. — In consequence of the late heavy rains, most of the bridges between Sydney and Razorback have been laid under water, in some cases so deep that persons on .horseback had to swim their horses over above them. All of (hem are more or less damaged, and some of them are entirely carried away, and unless they are immediately replaced, neither carts, drays, nor carriages, will be able to ply on these roads. The Penrith road has also been materially injured; theNepean rose higher in the course of a few hours than it had ever done before for the last twenty years.

Burning or thb Ladt Rafflbs. — About seven o'clock on Thursday morning, April 7, on Mr. Cook, one of the assistant harbour-masters, proceeding on board the Lady Raffles, to remove her from her moorings in the Cove, into the stream, he discovered that she was on fire in the hold. The alarm was immediately given, and the captains and crews of the Woodbridge and Mary Ann proceeded on board of her, and rendered every assistance. It was found impracticable to extinguish the fire by throwing .water into the hold, in consequence of the wool being pressed so close, that the water would not penetrate through it sufficiently quick to do good, they therefore determined to scuttle her, and about half-past nine, succeeded in making three or four holes in the ship's side, through which the water gradually began to flow. This had no visible effect for some time, for the smoke continued to rush from the stern-cabin windows, , the cuddy door, and every aperture where a vent could be obtained. In the mean time some of the crews of the Favourite and Beagle, were employed under their officers, in taking down all the spars, rigging, and tails, while others of them were busy in clearing the decks of any article that was moveable, by putting them into boats, and removing them ashore. About ten o'clock, an attempt was. made to get part of the cargo out of the hold, and about sixty bales of wool were thrown overboard into long boats, but the smoke began to increase so much, that the men could not remain below to throw any more wool up, without danger of suffocation. The hatches were again battened down, and covered over with tarpaulings. About half-past ten, it was evident that the holes made in the ship's side had the desired effect, as she was sinking fast. A chain was secured from the bows to one of the rocks on shore to keep her steady, and in about a quarter of an hour afterwards she sank. The Lady Raffles had on board 416 bales of wool, 140 bides, 120 puncheons of rum, 29 casks of black oil, and 48 bundles of whalebone.

111-Treatment of Immiguants. — The extraordinary conduct of the captain and surgeon of the ship Carthaginian towards an unfortunate woman named Bolton, by putting her in irons, and throwing several buckets of water over her when ill, has met with its just punishment, both these persons having been sentenced to be imprisoned for six months, and pay a fine of £50. Taking all the circumstances into consideration, the sentence is milder than we imagined it would have been, the facts being so outrageous that we expected they would have been confined for at least twelve months ; but perhaps sufficient has been done for example, as it is the first case of the kind that has been brought before the public. The captains of immigrant vessels have a very arduous and difficult task to perform, and we should not be inclined to look with too much rigour upon a slight excess of authority ; but the conduct of these men was marked with bo much brutality, that it was necessary they should be severely punished. The report of this case in England will shew intending emigrants that in the event of ill-treatment, they will be sure of obtaining redress when they arrive at Sydney.

The Bank of New South Wales, the oldest established in the colony, and depending entirely upon colonial support, has set the laudable example of reducing the interest on deposits. This Btep has no doubt been taken with the concurrence of, and under some preconcerted arrangement with' the other Sydney banks. We look upon this as the commencement of a general movement which must prove beneficial, if it merely stirs up the gold dust which has so long been gradually accumulating in the coffers of the banks. The ' times ' however need not be expected to undergo any very rapid change, and it is to be hoped that they will never again reach that unhealthy degree of excitement which was the fore-runner of the present depression. — GeeUmg Advertiser.

The Steam-Engine. — M. Delecluze has lately made a discovery among the manuscripts of Leonardo da Vinci, carrying back a knowledge of the steam-engine to at least as far back as the 1 5th century. He has published in the Artiste a notice on the life of Leonardo da Vinci, to which he adds a fac-simile of a page from one of his manuscripts, and on which are five sketches with the pen, representing the details of the apparatus of a steam-gun, with an explanatory note upon what he designates under the name of the " Architonnerre," and of which note the following is a translation : — " Invention of Archimedes. — The Architonnerre is a machine of fine copper, which throws balls with a loud report and great force. It is used in the following manner : — One third of this instrument contains a large quantity of charcoal fire. When the water is well heated, a screw at the top of the vessel which contains the water must be made quite tight. On closing the screw above, all the water will escape below, will descend into the heated portion of the instrument, and be immediately converted into a vapour so abundant and powerful, that it is wonderful to see its fury and hear the noise it produces. This machine will carry a hall of a talent in, weight." It is worthy of remark, that Leonardo' . da Vinci, far from claiming the merit of thiain*, . ve&tion for himself, or the men of hie tM3**» ' attributes it to Archimedes.— Gofgsona'* Mj&y" senger. / , . . .

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18420521.2.11

Bibliographic details

COLONIAL INTELLIGENCE., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume I, Issue 11, 21 May 1842

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1,075

COLONIAL INTELLIGENCE. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume I, Issue 11, 21 May 1842

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