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ELECTRIC ENERGY & WATER-POWER DEVELOPMENTS.

(Continued.)

(By Josepb Taylor," Mining Engineer.)

PART 11.

Both. our. district and Dominion axe teeming -with industrial, possibilities. In connection with the- utilisation of water power, it inay-be.-interesting to note that Mr. W. L. Moore, of Christchurch; representing the firm Messrs Bo vingand Col; water, power engineers, in this Dominion, and who recently returned from a three,- years' visit to Scotland, Norway and. Sweden, where" he -went to make .a.special study- of water power deKelopments.and of turbine--machinery, ias'stated,that.Sweden reminds him forcibly oil.New. Zealand in- respect of its opportunity for harnessing falling- water. ; He-Says that tie opportunity for water power developments is practically unlimregard to."both town needs, dairy factories, saw mills, mining and the like industries. One has- only-to go through the- files of..New Zealand papers," he remarks, "to see thai the people are becoming alive 'tc* the raaportance of the subject. Already some large schemes have been'carried': out, notably one for Dunedin City Council, and -other large undertakings are under discussion. . Mr.. Moor's- ■ opinion jjathered from Sweden is. that-" macb, can . be T done by utilising the small streams: He says : seems no doubt but that if localities could show a_ -really practical lo>*-pressure scheme. they would receive sympathetic -' Government assistance. If' properly 'worked a low pressure scheme is just as economical'' as a -high pressure scheme; and' -New- Zealand could profitably copy the example-of Sweden and introduce, where desirable low pressure schemes, the running* cost being much 'less. than, with coal. '

Referring ■■ to Sweden, he states: "There -is stream -or river in the whole country which, is not working some'. sort s of mill, of factory; while

every village of more than about 400 or .500 inhabitants has its electric light from the same source." Mr. Moor's firm 'have installed plants in Scotland, Norway, and Japan for supplying, electric currents; same for the manufacture of aluminium, others for the making of artificial manure from the nitrogen of the air; and they propose to turn their attention to New Zealand. THE CITY GF NELSON'S WATER PROBLEM. The City of Nelson has been for some years, and -still is, largely. concerned about the matter of its water supply. Expensive schemes have been proposed for bringing in the water from neighbouring rivers, such as une Maitai and the Roding; yet few, if any, of these schemes have reference to anything besides the mere matter of obtaining a sufficient supply of water for the people to drink and water their gardens with. Some have gone the additional length of providing for the flushing of the sewers and the watering of the streets; but none have contemplated the- possibility of supplying water at the game time for lighting and power purposes, and the very suggestion would be regarded as entirely Utopian, in spite of the fact that the scheme would be easily practicable. Even the City of Nelson is favourably situated for utilising water not only for city sanitation and ordinary uses, but also for generating electricity for electric lighting and; the supply of mechanical power, in addition to numerous other industrial applications. Jn addition to the Maitai, Roding and • Wairoa rivers the neighbourhood, there is a perennial stream at the head of Poor Man's Valley, not five mile 3 from the general Post Office, which, though somewhat small in volume, might , be picked -up at a height of over 1000 feet, in sufficient quantity to give power if piped to a turbine in the valley, sufficient to light up the city with elecand to drive all. the engines -and machinery in the surrounding neighbourhood. - .Water picked up at a height of 1000 feet would produce pressure-at the turbine of about 5001bs. a square inch; and this would be ample (as 1 pointed out in my lectures some years ago on the electric lighting of the City of Nelson) not only for all mechanical work but also for city lighting, and for all other industrial applications- of electrical energy. And the same stream would still be utilised as a source of water supply for the whole of Stoke and the surrounding locality. If properly harnessed, this perennial stream, although comparatively small in volume, may prove of great service and value to the people of Stoke and Nelson; for, whenever cheap power is avaiable, there the people and the manufacturing industries are sure sooner or later to centre.

. The following telegraons appeared in our second edition yesterday:-r

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Bibliographic details

ELECTRIC ENERGY & WATER-POWER DEVELOPMENTS., Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XLV, Issue XLV, 28 October 1910

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736

ELECTRIC ENERGY & WATER-POWER DEVELOPMENTS. Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XLV, Issue XLV, 28 October 1910

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