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GERMAN IMMIGRATION TO NEW ZEALAND.

THE ORIGIN OF THE MOUTERE : SETTLEMENT. : The appended interesting letter from Mr Fedor Kelliug, of Ranzau, was published last month in a Wellington paper in answer to some inaccuracies in Mr Guy D. Scholefield's chapter on the makrtig of a nation : — "Sir,— Your- paper of the 13th inst., has been sent to me from different quarters — presumably on account of ari article therein, headed "The Making of a Nation. Chapter V. By Guy H. Scholefield " "Much of interest might, of course, be added to Mr Scholefield's readable article, but that is not the object of my prerent letter, which is merely an endeavour to make a few corrections or modifications, that are necessary if this chapter of Mr Scholefield's article is to stand as a correct link in the history of our early colonising days — a record ihat it is doubtless desirable to have for the benefit of futjre. generations. "Th© first slight inao.*urae!es> occur under the Heading "The Hamburg Society." It is stated there that the conditions undT which the first German Expedition was brought out by Mr John N. Beit were practically the same as with English emigrants, but, as a matter of fact, they were exactly the Simfi. These wers that all Germans who came put. under the" Ne*. Zealand Company shpiiid be naturalised on arrival in the Colony, and should have all the rights and privileged of Englishmen. This was a great inducement — at any rate, to me — to come out here, and this ctndition has been faithfully obser"ea in every particular Jn the second expedition, which my brother and I brought out, with the assistance of Mr Btnoit, who could speak English, only cne alteration was made in the cond\tiens, viz., that we should give rmpiovment to pll emigrant,- who csiTnc o«f. with us. The oompaiiyjiauunderkkeii In do this for all former imig:-ant3, but it had by this time come to the end of its finances, and this was aho the reason why our expedition was delated .t veer. The correspondence on Ihis matte c can be seen in the Thirteenth Report of the Company. Under the sama Vcading, Mr Scholofield states that a nobleman, named Count EanUau, was the leading spirit in the emigration society at Hamburg. This is incorrect. a< the Count had nothing to do with the fiist expedition of German era.- j Giants, and, moreover, at that V mD .Y an .'i and for many jewa afterwards, there did not exist such a body as an eimgra; tion society at Hamburg. «*«• Al T do Chapeauronge arid. Co, (as agents in thatlcity for thS New Zealand Company) arranged the emigrations. "Under the heading 'The kettle menV "the i-iouteref' the statements are practically correct but Mr Remenschneider did not become the spmtmal pastor of the Germans. It was . Mr Heine, tWtWrd missionary under the N.G. Society. Shortly after Mr Wohlers had .gone to the South Xr P.cimenschneiaer went to the North (Tiovince of Taranaki). The name <» the missionary who was murdered was "Volkner" (not "Wolkner ). "We come now to the Mecklenburg emigrants. Count Rantzau planned no i other but this, his first expedition, and, in conjunction with Mr Ami do Chapeaurouge, personally (not the latter gentleman's firm) bought seven allotments of land. In this, and in all- tho provisions and merchandise, etc., which we brought out, the Count had a two-thirds and de Chapeaurouge a one-third, rnterast "The Skjold's" in which wo came out in 1844, was not a Norwegian ship, but a. Danish. We named our settle- | ment after 6Ur patron, Count Rantzau, 1 bub, at his request, tha letter "fc" was omitted ; hence the district has always been known by its present name of RanZa " Under the title of "Sleepy Hollow," Mr Scholefield quotas an article of Mr Wohlers' in which the latter tells Us 1 that Nelson lies in a deep gap Between ; high mountains, has always remained a sleepy place, even later when if became ■ the capital of a proi-inc*. it manifested j so liUlo political life, that it received the nick-name of "Sleepy Hollow. Now, sir, can anything he more contrary to fact than this statement! Then Mr Wohlers asked : Is it possible that j the German admixture may have been i conducive to the political quiet of the place? The idea that a few Gfriflan farmers should so influence a highly edu- _ cated community of English gentlemen is altogether so absurd that I should al- ' most be ashamed of a countryman of mine who asked snch a foolish question if it were not for the fact that the late Mr Wohlers was such an excellently good man. It seems to me that a good clergyman is not necessarily o good politician. To say that Nelson was politically a "Sleepy Hollow" is utterly absurd ; history proves that quite the; contrary is the fact. Nelson had more distinguished men than any other single provincial district before the Constitution came into operation. When Sir George Grey came here as Governor lie appointed the Hon. Mr Constantine Dillon his private secretary, and Mr Alfred Domett Colonial Secretary. Nelson had also Mr Edward Stafford, who was for many years and at various times Prune Minister of the colony; and also Dr. Monro and Mr Francis Dillon Bell, who were in turn Speakers of the House of Representatives; all these gentlement were in course of time knighted. Mr Domett was at one time Premier, and Mr (afterwards Sir WllUam) Fox, one of the distinguished "three P's," of Wellington, was originally a Nekon settler. But the expression "Sleepy Hollow," originally 'never applied to public or political, matters ; It arose in the following manner : In the early sixties a merchant from Auckland (Captain Dadly) came to Nelson on business. When he returned he was asked by his friends in the club what he thought of Nelson. H<replied to this effect : "It's a beautiful little place, splendid ficenery, very nice people, but as for business it was simply a "Sleepy Hollow." Apparently, however, Auckland itself was not quite up to the mark, else why did Mr D. seek fresh fields? The fact is that the

I complaint was general in those day.Bj ' throughout the whole colony, because ■ ; a great many more goods had been -imported than the people of New Zealand! : required — all the centres! were ov<!r-j . stacked. Mr Daldy's remarks ap-j peared in an Auckland paper on the; tolowing day, and in a little while msj description of Nelsoivjippeared to havej gono the rounds of the colony. _ Forj the reasons given above I have digress- \ ed slightly to express Strong dissent from the statement ot Mr Wohlers in connection with the expression "Sleepy: Hollow," which expresion to the pre-i sent day dnj'oys a nluch wider circula- ' tion than its merits call for. Mr Engst was not, as stated in the ; article under review, the fourth missionary sent out by the North German; Missionary Society. The fourth man j sent out by this society was a farmer , who was to work on the land and help to. support the missionaries.' When this '] was found to be impracticable, the '. man went Home again. Mr Engst, with thUee others, came from Berlin, and was not conected with the above-" named society. It is here also stated that I received theCros of the Order of the Crown, from Emperor WillU.n I "for cervices rendered from my cnontrymen." If, the expression "countrymen" refers merely to our German settlers it is scarcely correct. After 1866 I bad the honour of heing appointed a Consul for the North German Confederation, and after 1871 for the Empire. In later years- the West Coast was transferred from ih9 Nelson to the Canterbury Consulate, in consequence of which I had very little Consular work to doi Thinking that New Zealand was rather OVetstooked with German Consuls, I recommended the Foreign Office to abolish the Nelson 1 CoristilattJ. . Prince Bismarck . waited quite a twelvemonth before dealing with this matter, and when he then found that I had no business to report he - acted on my suggestion and the Nelson' Consulate existed no longer. Prince Bismirck then favourably recommended me to the Emperor, and the Order of the. Crown was bestowed on me for satisfactory service rendered to the Empire. I would also like to adjust Some of the statements with regard to my mission as Immigration Agent. I was not asked by the Government to report on tho practicability of obtaining Germans as military settlers, but proposed it to the Government, who approved of the scheme, and I accordingly left for Germany in 1863 to carry it out. That the firm of Cesar Godeffroy and Son wrote in 1862 to our Government is quite new to me, but at any rate it is entirely incorrect that the Government closed with them for the transportation of 1000 souls to be selected by me. This was part of my scheme which, howhowever, broke down on Mr Domett notifying me that the war had spread from Tarariaki to the Waikato. The ' above-named firm complained to me and not to our Government about the terms on which the emigrants were to come out, and asked me to write to the Government about the matter ,which I did. Their main objection lay in the fact that the whole of the emigrants were to be s6{uiet's', thereby entailing some delay, whereas the cohipariy- Wished to fill their .ships with the" utmost des- ' patch. That the various Governments of Germany would not allow, the .engagement of a body of old soldiers is not correct, for about this time I had a lone interview with the Grand . Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, when I raised this very question, and he told me that the very contrary was the case — they would prefer those men to emigrtae who had served their term as soldiers. Later on when Germany became an empire it interfered with the operations of unscrii' pulous emigration agents.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NEM19070603.2.2

Bibliographic details

Nelson Evening Mail, Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XLII, Issue XLII, 3 June 1907

Word Count
1,659

GERMAN IMMIGRATION TO NEW ZEALAND. Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XLII, Issue XLII, 3 June 1907

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