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THE STORM KING AND HER CREW.

The Storm King was built at Limehouse by Messrs Redfern and Paris. She is built •-• 'of the best slieel plates, one-eighth of an , inch in thickness. She takes 18 inches of 3, water when she is lying down. She took ." 1 two months in building, The Storm King „ makes five or knots an hour in a fair ... breeze. , . .. The ingenious and adventurous captain, . .Jorgensen, was born ab Riose, in Norway, in " '1867, and is therefore 33 years of age, He . „ „ went to sea when he was 14 years of age, C. -and obtained a master's certificate when he was 21. His first ship was engaged in the Baltic trade ; then, he went to a ship that sailed to New York and other American ports, in the grain trade. After that he be- ,;: '^came master and owner of the Eagna, with r., "which he traded to the East Indies, and ". West Coast of America, Australia, and /nearly all over the world. The vessel :'• which he had before the Eagna he lost on : .. the coast of Brazil, through the fault of . the pilot 1 Captain Jorgensen was married „ ■ a few., years ago at Richmond, near Melj, bourne, to an Australian-born lady. Mrs Jorgensen and her two children have been residing in Melbourne during the adventurous voyage of the captain in his remarkable : lifeboat, Captain Jorgensen pleasantly aays that his wife has been more anxious about him in the meantime than he has been about himself. He is a man of tall stature and powerful frame. Mr Johann Neilsen, the only companion of Captain Jorgensen on board the Storm King, is an old friend of his, and was his chief officer in the Ragna. He comes from Arendal, also in Norway. Of the mode of life of Captain Jorgenson •■«• ' fend Mr Neilsen on board tbe little craft on the way from England, the former spoke thus to a representative of the press at Capetown :—" We lived on preserved beef, mutton, and so on, as a rule. When it was fine we had a sleeping apartment in the fore tank, and we used the after tank for a smoking-room, and so forth. We cooked our food by means of a paraffin stove, and when it was exceptionally rough we lived in the fore compartment. When ■• we had a fair wind we ran before it, but when this could not be done she was held to by the goosewing, and we let her go. If necessary, the' ' below ' part can be battened down, and aic supplied by watertight ventilators. The only difficulty was that in. some cases the steersman found his job ' a rather hard one, for he had to stand face : to' the stern, the boat being stern on. Whenever she took ax sea it fell off her like water from a duck's back, and she did not fill, as other boats must have done. We ■-■ sustained no damage of any kind during the whole trip. What I did was done, not os some people have said, to gain notoriety . (I know the" sea too well for that), but simply to further .the ends of science. I claim to have discovered a new principle with respect to lifeboats, and so I took the :-■«.■ "view that a lifeboat inventor can prove his "-.- "own faith in his invention in no better way than by trusting himself to his boat. It is utterly useless* to talk about trying a life« ..-boat in .harbour; you must go out on a . . .. long' sea trip, and that is what I have done." On the voyage from London to Capetown "t /Captain Jorgensen reports that in the Bay -->-- of Biscay they had a rough experience, /'. They could not make muoh way againßt the {..-:'" sea, and he is confident that a good many y ' big ships would find ifc hard to live in such V . tremendous seas as they experienced. From vpotober .25 until they cast anchor in Per- *? 'nambucotno, weather proved niost disagree"l able, particularly, with regard to.the' calm ; belt, hfayy . raini ; squalls,. ; thunder, and lightning being experienced, without the ; advantage of any wind, When the weather "': /became fine again it was quite disheartening :'■ };l plktitfaptew says,, to see what litbie progress ?■ wns*made| pnly the very lightest of breezes s? 'l : - springing 'up. ; There was a heavy southerly -£-\-i iBWeJli andc^etgiuri:^ was^ against ythem, i^.»obiit.iiß^nil<ss^>eing-lost in 24 hoiir&ojviag' KSvto.thiKioatiße. - All sorts of trials were $iade rtP :ifl 6rdertamakethe.bo4t go ahead, an extra j3~3;>Buzeff.b'eing^ e3 iwja studding', sail on the n&V/ytfrd-sirm of ; the mamaail, and the expedient ft;V waa found .to acts with /'considerable, au^oess, ■ V ; .was .the extra ,saiL <Jaught ,what Avind there Kigj^w* 8 ? getijipg very cloaq to the jbfeezW;' An wob also- rigged Up, three dars lashed together, with a ipuxtljas a Oft wbi,o^;wus hoiabed the extra main,.

sail, but after three days it was rigged down again, "as it was more bother than use.*" The boat kept nice and cool in the warm latitudes, the water splashing up her sides with advantage. This was found to be a great relief, particularly in the calm belt, arid all that the captain and his mate had to do was to go under thfe deck away from the rain, and, what was just as bad, the fierce heat which they experienced between the .squalls, and take life comfortably. From Pernambuoo to Capetown the Storm King experienced scarcely any weather which was severe in comparison with the furious storm they had in the Bay of Biscay. Daring the latter portion of the trip to the Cape, how» ever, she had nearly contrary winds and sea continually against her, and the bottom of the boat was so dirty that they could hardly get her to move.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NEM18900728.2.23

Bibliographic details

THE STORM KING AND HER CREW., Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XXIV, Issue 176, 28 July 1890

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959

THE STORM KING AND HER CREW. Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XXIV, Issue 176, 28 July 1890

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