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The Hon Mr Larnach, in replying to the toast of his health at the banquet which was givea to him in Wellington last week, said he was leaving New Zealand in order to find some field for his energies, because his nature was such that if he lived at ease he would soon ge into decay. If Tictoria had not ©ffered such inducements he would have gone to South America, Whilst he felt aorry that things had become so stagnant in this colony as to compel him to form this conclusion and seek pastures new, he thought the time waa, not far distant when a very different state of things would prevail. Some people made out the depression to be worse than it was. If men would buckle up and get over that feeling — make 'up their minds that they were in one of the grandest countries in the world, and go together shoulder to shoulder— they would very Boon make a different country of New Zealand. •In going to Melbourne he would not be cutting his acquaintance/jHth New Zealand. In fact he believed he would rather strengthen it, beoauae he would be able to do much more good for the colony in Victoria thaa by remaining here. Whenever he could be of use to New Zealand it would afford him the greatest pleasure to ©ffer any assistance that lay in his power. It was not his intention to give up his seat during the present Parliament. — (Applause). He might mention that many of his etrongest supporters amongst his constituents had not only approved his intention to retain it this Parliament, but had also said that if he would only consent to allow himself to jbe nominated for a further term and promise to attend the Assembly year by year they would put him into his seat again. — (Renewed cheers). Ho could not say how far he would go in that direction, but he intended to be present at every session of the present Parliament. Tho following letter apprared in tie Spectator : — " Sir, — Your dog-loving readers may be interested in the following instance of animal sagacity. • Bob' is a'fine two-year old mastiff, with head and face of massive strength, heightened by greab mildness of expression. On© day he was aef n carrying a hon, very gently, in his mouth, to tho kennel. Plooing her in one corner, he stood sentry while ahe laid aa egg, which he at once devoured. From fcbat day the two have teen fast friends, the hen refusing to lay anywhere bnt in ' Bob's 1 kennel, and getting her reward' in the dainty morsels from his platter. There mast have been a tit of canine reasoning here. ' Bob' mn»t have found epgs to his liking, that they were laid by hen*, and that ho could best seenro a supply by having a b.en to himself. — I am, Sir, &0., Thomas Hamer.-— Little Lever, July 3rd."

The following are given as the greatest shearing records ever made with merino sheep:— The eighth annual shearing of the Central Wiseonain Sheep " Breeders' and Wool Growers' Association cloßed at Kipon, Wis., recently. In results it was tb c best ever held there or in the world on merino sheep. A six->year-old ram, belonging to T. F. and C. D. M'Connell, of Ripon* Bheared 381bs of wool, the heaviest fleece of which there is any record in America or Europe, and over 51b heavier than any ever before given. A two-year-old ran* belonging to the same parties sheared the unprecedented fleece of 331 b ; another 281 b, and stilljanother 311 b, being heavier than ever taken from a two-year-old so far as there is any record. One of their yearling rams sheared 19£lb, U. Wood, Brandon, Wiß., sheared 30£lb from a three-year old ram, 271 b from a two-year-old, and 211 b from a four -year-old ewe. Dixon Bros , of Brandon, sheared a three-year-old ram that produced 29|lb. Mr Samuel McCaugherty, of Melbourne, was interviewed in New York on July 22nd, and gave an interesting account of the status of the wool business in the Australian colonies. He is represented as the owner of a million of sheep. The wind up of his remarks was to the effect that if the Amerin ban tariff off wool the^Australiann product will be worth 5o more per lb at once, and American wool will fall 50. Oar chief source of profit he added, is on the sale of surplus etook, for which there is always a good market.

The steamer Voltaire arrived at Liverpool on. July 2nd, with Congo despatches dated May 27th, which gave further detiffils concerning' Stanley's camp. His followers were suffering from laok of food and maladies arising from the surrounding swamp. Reconnoitering parties which passed along Stanley's route B&yr quan* tities of human bones, apparently remains of victims who .had fallen in fights between Stanley's followers and the natives. Belief had been reoeived for the camp from Tippoo Tib, Major Barttelot, believing that Stanley is not more than 500 miles bey op d the camp in the direction of Khartoum, had stuok his tents and pushed on to join him, According to despatches from London, dated July 14th, it is believed at the Foreign Office that the "White Pasha" is Henry M. Stanley, now in the province of Bahr el Gazel, marching on to ' Khartoum. It is stated that the Foreign Office had knowledge all along of some such intention as this on Stanley's part, and the real object of the expedition at the last moment was not the relief of Emir, who needed no immediate aid, but the relief of Lupton Bey, Slatin Bey, Newfield, a German, and several other Europeans at Khartoum, whose terrible sufferings were made known at the time to the Government. Absolute aeorecy as regard? Stanley's movements was necessary. A courier dirijjt from Omb or man, at Cairo, July 23rd,- statrs that Abdullah proposed matching at once at I the head of a heavy force to meet the Wbite Pasha, wbo is still advancing, and who is now Bupposed to be Emm Bey.

A telegram from Stockholm to the Liverpool Post Bays of the fires in Sweden :— "Latest advices from Umea and Sundsvall fully confirm the first reports of the terrible havoc wrought by tbe reoenfc conflagrations. In Umea the damage ib estimated at 5,000.000 kroner, and at 4,000,000 kroner in the latter town. Out of a population of 11,000 in Sundsvall, 9000 persons are homeless, and in Umea the houseless ones number between 2500 and 3000. King Oscar, acoompanied by several ministers and high State officials, is ia the devasted districts superintending the energetic measures which have been promptly taken for the relief of the sufferers. Tents, blankets, clothing, and provisions have been sent from here in large quantities, and subscriptions have been opened in all the prinoi. pal towns. It is feared the loss of life will prove to have been very considerable, for already charred human remains have been dug from beneath the still smoking ruins. I Reports of further conflagrations continue to reaoh us. At Lilla Edet, .five miles from Gothenburg, 60 houses were burnt down. In the distrios of Ileby, Talun, Sola, and Ostanby, extensive traots of forest and a number of farms have been destroyed. " To-day, as from the time of its introduction Wolfe's Schnapps takes the lead of very other stimulant and tonio in the estimation of the public and of soientiflo men.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NEM18880827.2.13

Bibliographic details

Nelson Evening Mail, Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XXII, Issue 201, 27 August 1888

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1,245

Nelson Evening Mail Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XXII, Issue 201, 27 August 1888

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