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SOCIAL GOSSIP FROM HOME.

(From a London correspondent of the Argus . ) Private eooiety in London of the ordinary type is somewhat languishing, not ao muoh for want of lands — for everybody seems better off than in recent years— bub because, as at present organised, it does not suit the tastes of the indispensable '• young man," and because there is a certain amount of unreality about it which repels the present generation. The main objeot of society is supposed to be to bring young men and maidens together with a view to promoting matrimooy ; but in these d&ys of innumerable and gigantic par ies, in order to fill a , house it ia necessary to call together numbers of young men and maidens who don't want ' to marry when thoy meet, end if they did wouldn't bo let. All (ho official and ceremonial Booiety on the other hand, is flourishing exceedingly, partly beoauusa it ia Jubilee year, and partly because the Tories ere the hosts, for they know more people, and hare fewer unpresentable hangers on. On Saturday there was such a levee as was never before known in England. Three '• thousand gentlemen in gorgeous attire passed through the stately old world drawing room of St James' Palace, and bowed to the Prince of Wales, whose neck at the ■md refused to do its office, so that he could only recognise those who passed before him by a movement of his wearied eyes. By his side was the Grand Duke Michael Michaelovich of Russia, who is said to be engaged to his second and most lively daughter. The Grand is a very jovial, boyish young fellow, who talks English fluently, and is fond of English society ; but the bride will have to enter the orthodox Greek Church, which, will make a splutter among the Puritans. On Sunday morning Mr Speaker Peel headed the House of Commons in a procession to St Margaret's Church, which lies under the wing of Westminster ■ Abbey, and which is by immemorial tradition considered to be the Church of the Commons of England. There a thanksgiving service was held on account of the Queen's Jubilee. The House of Commons has only visited its church twice before during the present reign, and each of these occasions was one of tribulation, the first occurring during the Crimean war, and the second during the Indian mutiny. Mr Gladstone, Mr W. H. Smith, Lord Hartington, and Mr Goschen were all in the first rank following the Speaker, and with one or two others eat in the Speaker's pew. The sermon was preached by Dr Boyd Carpenter, a fashionable Tyburnian preacher, who has recently been transferred to the somewhat inappropriate berth of the Bishopric of Ripon. He, apparently, took occasion to preach at Mr Gladstone, even alluding to General Gordon, whose name is now but seldom heard. Mr Gladstone has grown somewhat hard of hearing with the lapse of years, aud the preacher's castigation fell idly on his victim, who, however, seemed dimly conscious from time to time that something was being said which personally concerned him, as more than once he put up bis hand behind his ear to listen. About 400 members were announced as having been invited to accompany the Speaker out of 670 The omissions in the list of invited members cansed a good deal of curiosity, as it was supposed that they indicated the personal feelings of the Speaker as to the fitness or otherwise of members to join him in religious exercises. The whole of the Parnellites were, of course, absent, as were also John Morley, Sir William Harcourt, both the Chamberlains, Bandolph Churchill, La» bouchere, and Bradlaugh ; whilst, on the other hand, two Roman Catholics, seven Jews, and many Nonconformists were of the congregation. I condoled next day with Mr Labouchere on the faot that the Speaker had not invited him, but Mr Labouchere dispelled my fears that the Speaker had thought him an unfit person to take part in a religious ceremony by explaining that Mr Peel had only issued cards to those who had specially intimated a desire to receive them. Tuesday, being the Queen's birthday, was celebrated in London by the usual brilliant military parade, known as the " trooping of the colors," at the Horse Guards, Ttfe Princes of the Blood, all the head-quarters staff, and the foreign royalties and attaches were,'present on horseback. The troops on the ground comprised portions of a battalion from each of the three regiments of Foot Guards, and a troop of the second Life Guards, accompanied by their band, in their old Charles 11. dresses of oloth-of-gold coats and black jockey caps. In the centre of the ground were the three massed bands of the Foot Guards, numbering over 200, with their drum majors, in eighteenth century State uniforms. In the windows of the Government offices, and on the ground " within the line of sentries," London society lounged about and watched the show, whilst beyond stood an enormous crowd of the general public. In the evening, as is usual, all the Cabinet Ministers and great officers of State held full dress banquets, at which about 700 notables were entertained ; and after that Lady Salisbury threw open the interminable and georgeous saloons of the Foreign Office to these 700, their wives and daughters, and about 1500 of the cream of society, native and foreign. Lady Salisbury is a very shy and domesticated little old lady, who so much abhors the fuss of " receiving " strangers that on this occasion she fairly struck work, hid herself in the crowd of her own guests, and left the duty of "receiving" to the lovely Mrs Henry Manners, the wife of Lord Salisbury's Secretary. Mr Henry Manners is the perfection of a young aristocrat of the outworn type, as might be expected in the son of the poet who wrote — " Let arts and commerce, laws and learning die, Bat give us still our old nobility." The young man is now well assured of succeeding his uncle, the Duke of Rutland, who is past seventy, and shows no abatement of the aversion which he has ever manifested for the holy estate of matrimony. Mrs Henry Manners was a Miss Violet Lindsay, about whom all the world went mad eight years ago. She has a most perfect Madonna face, but looks as if she was shaky about the lungs, which indeed she is. She is niece by marriage of Lady Wantage, the daughter of old Jones Lloyd, founder of the London and Westminster Bank, and as Lord arid Lady Wantage are childless they heap untold gold on their interesting nephew and niece, who would, otherwise have not much of this world's goods, the Rutland patrimony having been sadly shattered by agricultural depression. The Derby this year came off in very dark and chilly weather — a circumstance which tended to emphasise its decreasing'popularity, It is still attended, out of habit, by hosts of Londoners, who know and care nothing about racing; and at sunrise the Downs, as of old, present the unique spectacle of 10,000 lean and vermin-eaten ragamuflins slumbering on Che grass. But as a race, it is being eclipsed by mammoth prizes, established at rival meetings, and the entries for it are diminishing year by year. This year it seemed as if the race lay between two women. " Mr Manton " (the Dowager Duchess of Montrose,) owner of Eiridspord, and " Mr Fern," owner of the Baron. "Mr Fern "is a Mrs Vigors, a widow; but the Baron ia said to have ! recently passed from her hands, under ia private arrangement, to those of the Baroness Burdett-Couttß, that Female Faust, who, in her rejuvenesence, had conceived the singular ambition of being the first lady winner of the Blue Ribbon, and thought she was safe to attain her desire by investing in one of the hottest favoriteß of our time. But, as you know, the race waß won by the dark horse Merry Hampton. Enjoy Life.— What a truly beautiful world we live in 1 We can desire no better when in good health ; but how often do the majority of people like giving it up disheartened, discouraged, and worried out with disease, when there is no occasion for this feeling, Green's August Flower will make them as free from disease as when born. Dyspepsia and Liver Complaint are the direct cause of seventy-five per cent, ojf such maladies as Biliousness, Indigestion, Sick Headache, Coßtiveness, Nervous Prostration, Dizziness of the Head, Palpitation of the Heart, and other distressing symptom^. Three doßes of August Flower will prove its wonderful effect. Sold by all Druggists ait 3s. 6d. per bottle. Sample bottles, 6<3 Try it. * * "Rough on Itch."—" Rough on Itch" cures skin humors, eruptions, ring worm, tetter, salt rheum, frosted feet, chilblains, itch byjpoison, barber's itch

A correspondent of a London paper states that he has found the following remedy to be useful in allaying the suffering caused by the bites of mosquitoes and gnats. A few fronds of the common fern, bruised till the moisture in them is free, rubbed over the punotured spot, will ensure at least comparative comfort. I have tried this, he says, in Australia, South Africa, and in the Western woods of America for mosquito bites; and in New Zealand against the bite of the almost fieroer fiends, sandfhes, and never railed in finding relief. Again, only last Summer, in Epping Forest, I was successful under the same treatment, the goats there proving worthy proxies of the mosquitoes of other lands. Those fond of experiments might try, as in years gone by I have done, the hanging of a pieoe of raw beef over their heads when retiring to rest for the night. The mosquitoes will fasten upon it, gorge themselves to repletion, and become helpless. In the morning a soothing sense of enjoyed revenge comes when the meat, gently cut away from the string upon which it hangs, is allowed to fall with its myriad foes into -a basin of boiling water. The best medicine known is SANDER and SONS' EUCALYPTI EXTRACT, Test its eminent powerful effects in coughs, coids, influenza, &c. — the relief is instantaneous. Thousands gives the most gratifying testimony. His Majesty the King of Italy, and medical syndicates all over the globe, are its patrons. Read the official reports which accompany each bottle. We have no occasion to offer rewards in proof of the genuineness of our references. The official reports of medical clinics and universities, the official communication of the Consul General for Italy at Melbourne; the diploma awarded International Exhibition, Amsterdam—all these are authentic documents, and, as such, not open to doubt. We add here epitome of one of the various cases treated by Siegen, M.D., Professor, etc. : Burning of the right hand through the explosion of a small oil stove. The epidermis on the volar and palmer side of the thirty-year-old patient was completely separated and lifted up as far as the joint of the hand. The likewise lifted nails were hanging loose, and half of the phalanx of the nail of the middle finger was coaled. The wounds thus contracted healed in three weeks under daily appliaations of Eucalypti Extract dressing. The patient has retained the full use of her hand. — [Advt.] An Alabaster Box, — Young gir finding their complexion growing sallow, and their skin becoming rough or freckly, resort to perfumed ointments for a restoration or their bloom. All such should use American Co's Hop Bitters, which will restore bloom to cheeks, whiteness and beauty to their complexion, making rich blood, good health, and happy smiles. Read To-day, as from the time of its introduction Wolfe's Schnapps takes the lead of every other stimulant and tonic in the estimation of the public and of scientific men.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NEM18870812.2.22

Bibliographic details

SOCIAL GOSSIP FROM HOME., Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XXI, Issue 19, 12 August 1887

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SOCIAL GOSSIP FROM HOME. Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XXI, Issue 19, 12 August 1887

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