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CLIPPINGS FROM THE "HOME NEWS."

f June 3.)

" Lord Tennyson is reported," says Truth, 11 to have received £700 from Messrs Maomillan for his extraordinary Jubilee ode. Now the Poet Laureate receives a salary of £200 a year and a butt of wine for writing soch odes for the British nation. Can it be, then that Lord Tennyson has sold the property of the British nation to Messrs Maomillan for £700? If so, of course, the money will be paid into the Treasury ; so the country may be fairly congratulated on having for once made an excellent bargain."

A despatch from Mexico announces thai; heavy shocks of earthquake were felt throughout the valley on May 30. The earth tremor waß of a violent kind, and had a lifting motion, lasting five second. This was followed by a low roar and a strong vibration of the earth from east to west, lasting thirtynine seconds.' The houses locked, and thousands of people left their beds. A short time afterwards there was another shock, accompanied by the same effects in the suburban towns as in Mexico. The seismological instruments at the Sohool of Mines were affected to an extent, proving the shocks to have been of a severe character. The Bhooka were general in the Stales of Hidalgo, Mexico, Orelios, Puebla, Talascala, Vera Cruz, and Oajaca. The. force of the earthquake caused bells to ring and walls to orack.

Considerable sensation has been created in medical circles in Vienna, the correspondent of the Daily Chronicle states, by the discovery of a supposed cure for consumption and other tubercular affections of the lungs or other parts of the bcdy. The discover is Dr Kolischer, a young operator in the clinical department of Professor. Albert Dr Kolischer, starting on the assumption that tuberculosis occasionally heals naturally, owing to the tubercles becoming calcined, hit upon the idea of causing artificial calcination by means of hypodermic injections of a compound described as " calcium phospboricum " into the limbs of persons affected with local tuberculosis. He made a number of experiments with a view to testing his discovery, and in every case the experiments turned out successful. At the last meeting of the Vienna Society of Physicians, Dr Kolischer read a paper on the result of his experiments, and introduced to the meeting several persons who had been cured by his method. He is about to carry his experiments further by making similar experiments upon persons suffering from tuberculosis of the lupgs. The Petit Mavscillais gives the following account of b very exciting scene which occurred at a bull fight outside Sarngoasa the other day : — ''After two bulls had been daspaiched without any special incident, the third, an animal named Salado, jumped over the barrier into the amphitheatre, crushing an old man and a lad of eighteen. It would ba difficult to give an adequate description of the panic and tumult which ensued. The whole of the spectators jumped on their feet. In the twinkling of an eye tho space around the bull wnß vacated, and the crowd rushed into a corner, trying to protect itself by means of planks and sticks from his expected charge. The bull made a deaperats rush for a young 1 girl, who with a ehrieff fell to the ground, bub one of the torreadors, with great presence of mind, trailed a red cloth in the path and thus diverted his attention from the gir), who was dragged unconscious to a place of saL ty. The bull next trampled under foot a;, unfortunate vendor of drinking \vater, nnd forced bis way into that pare of the ring known as the "Tartulia." A young man in one of the boxes tried to shoot him, bun the three bullets from his revolver which he managed to lodge ia him only served to increase his fury. One of the men then tried to run him through, but he missed his fiim, and the bull charged him furiously. The man stepped aside, and tho bull's horns went 60 deep into tho wooden paling that before ho could withdraw them two |men plunged their swords into him. Even' this did not kill him outright, the enraged animal staggering some thirty yards and breaking dowo a number of benches before the breath was out of his body." In the course of a speech at Ballyvourney on Sunday. May 29, Dr Tanner M. P., referring to the Liberal Unionists, said Judas Iscariot sold his Master for Gold, and Hartington, Chamberlain, and Goschen, and men of that kind, had sold their leader and their master, Mr Gladstone— (cheers)— for gold. Hartington sold him because he possessed vast estates in Ireland and he wished to become the leader of the Liberal party. Chamberlain sold him because he wanted to become a great man, and he saw another man connected with Mr Gladstone's Government going ahead. That was the late Chief Secretary for Ireland, Mr John Morley. (Cheers.) Of course, when he saw him going ahead, he knew Joe Chamberlain, the screwdriver, should fall back. These were the men who tried to stir up discord between this country and the great democracy of England. It was on account of these men selling their leader and their party that the present Tory Government of Lord Salisbury— (groans)— was actually employed in forging new chains and fetters for Ireland. These were the men who sent that Orange bigot and scoundrel King Harman — (groans) --to be under Secretary, and sent a man named Arthur Bfllfour — (renewed groans and hisses )~ — the long-legged spider — (laughter) — to be Chief Secretary for Ireland. They knew that the spider belonged to a very nasty order of insects, the blood -sucking order, and it was because this Balfour was of the order of blood-suckers that he was sent over as the real master in Ireland, for Caßtlereagh was simply a nincompoop placed there to show that there was somebody with an Irish title at the head of affairs, while it wan the bloodsucker Balfour, assisted by the vampire King Harman, that was really doing the mischief. Those men who declared that they would wish to be the friends of the Irish were doing everything they could to make mischief in Ireland, and their object in so doing was to deliver over the Irish people to the tender mercies of the little gang and their unfortunate dupes and minions who worked evil in the country. Eeferring to Mr Hegarty, whose murder was recently attempted in Mill street, the member for Mid Cork said he had not come there on the occasion to abuse any one, not even Jerry Hegarty — (hisses)- because he was too low to abuse. There were some inseots that crawled on the face of the earth that were too small to crush. There were certain insects that if one did happen to crush them would amell. He did not want to abuse Hegarty or to crush him; but they could rest assured that every man who was a renegrade to Ireland and to her rights would meet with his deserts. Therfore he was there to speak to the true men, and ask them, as they had been true in tho past, to be more true and firm and solid as this year of coercion went on. (Cheers.) What were they t6 do with reference to evictions ? Were they to resist them or were they not ? He would say resist to the uttermost, resist by every legitimate means in their power. (Cheers.) It was by fighting, and fighting alone, that they had been able to gain substantial advantage in this country within recent years. They never would gain anything by sitting down and doing nothing. He did not want them to be shot, but let them put the landlord gang to every expense they possibly could, and if they did they could not afford to go on evicting. The landlords were now in their last ditch. It was for them to carry the last rampart, and then Charles Ir- 6 v ar s £ &tnell (cheers and a voice : « And Michael Davitt"), aye, and Michael Davitt, would mount upon the conquered earthworks of the enemy, and spread the dear oia standard of the nation onco more to the breeze demonstrating to the civilised world the fact that the Irish nation had gained what for many centuries they had fought and suffered and died for. (Prolonged cheering.) Particulars have come from Kurrachee as to the desperate conduct of the sepoy of the 26th Native Infanty, who, having- co t possession of forty rounds of amunition, ran amuck through the lines at one o'clock on the morning of 20th May. It appears that he first shot two sepoya who were asleep in the barrack verandah. On the alarm being Bounded the regiment turned out, bub nothing could be done till daylight when detachmdnta were sent in various directions to seafch for him. Meanwhile tho murderer proceeded to the soldiers' bazaar and shot four shopkeepers who were sleeping outside their nouses. Next proceeding to the plain behind the infantry lines, he shot five cprtmen, and when he fonnd that the regiment had turned out, he took refuge in a stone enclosure, wheno he fired many rounds. The colonel oolled for volunteers to rush upon. him, and tyvo sepoya did so, bat when they got within Bis yards of him he shot bitnuelf

through the heart. The eleven men whom he had ahofc were killed on tho spot, or died in a few hoars. The church of Meixotl, Merico, contains a remarkable veil of great value. For nearly three centuries Spaniards were in the habit of vowing a jewel to the veil of Our Lady of I Meixotl if they returned safely from a voyage to Spain, until in Maximilian's time ' the veil was bejewelled to the value of about £40,000. Three German adventurers, after Maximilian's failure, determined to carry awaythi3 veil as booty. They made their plans with great oare and caution, and secured the veil ; but in some way they were discovered, and a party of pursuers overtook them in a narrow pass, where two of them were killed, the third escaping under cover of darkness, leaving behind him, however, the precious veil, which was regained and restored to the altar, where it is more vigilantly guarded than ever. Another colossal hotel, palatial both in structure and appearance, was opened in London on Wednesday. It has received^.its name, " The Victoria, " in honour of "the Queen's Jubilee. In this age of travel it has been found that the inoreasing demand for accomodation necessitates the building of huge hotels of this kind in large populous centres throughout the world. Those of London are all paying speculations, conducted mostly after the American fashion, but still dinging to the old and vexatious system of petty charges and fees to servants. The Victoria has five hundred, rooms, and it is said that twenty-four hours after the opening all had been engaged. London is fast becoming a city of pleasure— a lounge for the idlers of both hemispheres, who flock to the monster hotels which compete prejudicially with the lodging houses and small hotels. Britons in general are not a gregarious race, but the greater domestic comfort to be obtained in a large hotel may cause a revolution in that respect, and induce Englishmen to congregate in those places after the manner of their American cousins.

A Fact Worth Knowing.— Are you suffering with Consumption, Coughs, Severe Colds settled on the Breast, Pneumonia, or ny disease of the Throat and Lungs ? If so, go to your Druggist and get a bottle of Boschee's German Syrup. The people are going wild over its success, and Druggists all over our country are writing us of its wonderful cures among their customers. It nas by far the largest sale of any remedy, simply because it is of so much value in all affections of this kind. Chronic cases quickly yield to it. Druggists recommend it and physicians prescribe it. If you wish to try its superior virtue, get a Sample Bottle for 6d. Large size bottle 3s 6d. Three doses will relieve any case. Try it, Cured op Drinking.— •' A young friend of mine was cured of an insatiable thirst for liquor, that had so prostrated his system that he was unable to do any business. He was entirely cured" by the use of Am. Co's Hop Bitters. It allayed all that burning thirst, toak away the appetite for liquor, made his nerves steady, and he has remained a sober end steady man for more than two years, and has no desire to return to his cups."— From a leading E.R. Official. To-day, as from the time of its introduction Wolfe's Schnapps takes the lead of every other stimulant and tonic in the estimation of the public and of scientific men ??)-«,-•

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Bibliographic details

CLIPPINGS FROM THE "HOME NEWS.", Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XXI, Issue 172, 22 July 1887

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2,147

CLIPPINGS FROM THE "HOME NEWS." Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XXI, Issue 172, 22 July 1887

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