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THE WAR IN EGYPT.

Ismailia, Sept 13. ! The troops for the attack on Tel-el-Kebir were arranged in the following order : — One troop of the Indian Contingent, with a battery of mountain guns, on the extreme left, the Fourth Brigade, under General Ashburnham, the Highland Brigade, and General Graham's Brigade, in the ordei named, and a brigade of Guards on the right to, support General Graham. A 40-pounderf was pushed three miles up the railway. j „ London, Sept 13. A correspondent sends the following .*— { At first the fire of the rebels was very wild] It came from both infantry, and . artillery] and passed over our heads, they being dis-! concerted by our sudden attack. With daylight the enemy's .fire improved, and became like a hailstorm. Many men fell, but not for a second did our advance stop. One of the covering parties, lying down, fired over, while those in front pressed on. General Graham's .Brigade worked gallantly. Nothing could surpass - their cheer, which resembled a wild yell, and could be heard above the din of- .musketry,, as they charged up the steep slope of the trenches. The Egyptians were terror-stricken, and many hid! in corners of the works, while! others fled at . the, , utmost . , speed, throwing everything; fron^.them., Our work;, however, was not yet ended. A large inner redoubt on Arabi* s left wing, wellarmed.tva-s still held intact; but the British troops were not to be deterred. With another brilliant .rush they were among ;the enemy; bayonetting, the gunners at the guns, and capturing the heavy, artillery. Thuß *we captured the key of the position. In fifteen minutes from the first rush we were its masters./ The rattle of the enemy's musketry died away, while our men forsook the bayonet and picked off by bullet any.,of the rebels who still showed fight in their redoubt. On the south, the enemy stood a few minutes longer, perhaps a quarter of an hour, but the appearance of our cavalry on their right flank soon hastened their retreat. In a few minutes one 'rushing, stream of fugitives was making for Zag-a-Zig, flying out of all their entrenchments. A little later, General MacPherson, with the Indian Brigade, burst upon the flying foe from the south, and the rout was complete. The artillery, coming up at a gallop, unlimbered, and sent their shot and shell after the rebels* adding to the confusion., ; The . cavalry had got right around the enemy's flank -when the fight began. All the work was done by our troops in the first line of attack. The principal fortifications : had been taken by the time the Guards and the Fourth Brigade came up. Alexandbia, September 14. Sutros Bey, who lirrived from Cairo today, told the Khedive the rebel force at Tel-el-Kebir, at the time the British attack commenced, numbered 30,000 regulars, 7000 Bedouins, and 3000 volunteers. The first news of Wednesday's battle which reached Cairo was a report of a great Egyptian victory, and when, subsequently, ifc was announced that Arabi was on his way to Cairo it was rumoured that he bore with him Admiral Seymour's head. The people of Cairo had never heard of Sir Garnet Wolseley and imagined that Admiral Seymour commanded the British forces, and when Arabi Pasha arrived alone the,people stoned him. The following general order has been issued to be read at the head of every British regiment on three successive parades :— «. The General C6mmahding-in-Chief congratulates the army upon its brilliant success, crowned by the capture of Arabi Pasha and the surrender of Cairo. The General Commanding-in-Chief feels proud to place upon record the fact that the brilliant achievements of the campaign, nre tQ be attributed to the high

courage and noble devotion of all ranks called upon to show discipline under exceptional privations, to give proof of fortitude in extreme toil, and to show contempt for danger in battle. Officers and men have responded with zeal and alacrity, adding another chapter to the long roll of British victories." September 16. Arabi Pasha was taken before the Khedive to-day. He presented a loathsome picture of grovelling servility. He swore he had not been aware he was fighting against the Khedive. The Khedive remained standing while Arabi Pasha was in his presence. When Arabi bad concluded the Khedive ordered his removal. Cairo, September 21, About £200,000 was taken from the Treasury by Arabi Pasha. Eighteen thousand pounds deficit has been discovered at the War Office. Deficits are probable also in the Department of the Interior. London, September 21. The Times writing on the Suez Canal declares thafc iv an age when the control of nations over arms of the sea passing through or commanded by their territory, is being everywhere abolished, it is impossible that we can allow the directors of a company to arrogate powers as extensive as were ever claimed by Denmark over the Sound. Neutralisation of the Suez Canal, in its reasonable sense, is understood to mean that it shall be regarded as an arm of the sea. There is now a question of the enlargement of the canal.

or construction of a new one. The practical question just now is, how to secure ourselves, in case ol complications which may possibly arise, against being thwarted by M. De Lesseps. The subject of the canal will, we believe, seriously engage the attention of the Government. A Herald cable special from Cairo says:—- --" Repeated conversations with representative men, of all shades of opinion, show the feeling of the country is as follows:— First, the political sectarians are sulky and defiant, except in the presence of British soldiers, -who seldom penetrate into the purely Arab quarters. Yesterday, the sectarians again reported that 50,000 Russians were on their way to Egypt, to drive out the British. The •sectarians need an iron rule. Examples should also be made of a few ultranationalists, who are hand-in-glove with the sectarians. : Second, moderate nationalists only fear that the English will go away too soon, leaving them at the mercy of thieving communists — the city rabble instigated by the sectarians; Third; the ignorant goodnatured masses, whose political aspirations are limited to a minimum of taxation, are delighted that all is finished." Europeans are again coming into the villages to buy cotton. . The cheerful readines with "which. -iOOO soldiers, at Tantah surrendered to General Alisonf with only fifty 'Gordon Highlanders, proves the joy of the fighting. men .at the. prospect. of returning - hdineV The negroes., under. Abdullah Pasha surrendered v. at 7 Damietta* somewhat re'•luctantiy. "The i opinion of the enlightened classes inure is; that England is* morally bounel ; to establish a strong government. The' Herald's Cairo special says : " Upon • the news 'arriving from Tantah of the wholesale massacre of Christians there, Arabi sent a. body of. military, to hang twelve . of* the /iinglea&ers djE the mob.,; He also sent orders '"t-iroUgh" the. 7 country that: all Christians s^o,uiu "he *^eft. i unmolested under, pain of '" 3 -d__t'_. "Tie rewarcjed. Ahmed Bey, who pro-,tectedth^-fugitiv'Ss who ; had escaped from 1 .he massacre % at Tantah." .... A Councilof War was held on August sth.. Fearing an attapk frdin Ismailia,.^it-was*,de-j _i_ed ; to J dest-6y"tlie : Canal. Ttyere .was much : discussion whether it should "be destroyed at. Once, or- whether iit would be better to wait .for,*anact;of hosjiility.in^that direction. In .the'fmeanlicie, the.Engineers were despatched! v wltT_ tofpMoes "to Kautara, Serapeum. and 1 Chaldof . M^pmed.Fehm-y ' strongly- urged ; the imniedjate.degbruction of the Canal-/ but! this was opposed Joy, Arabi, when M7De; Lesseps^ guaranteed -its - neutrality,' and so| certainly saved the.. -Canal from considerable! damage.^^The.-jtospedo: parties were only! .withelrawnj tisrj,,; Jioiirs . hefore Sir Garnet j "Wolseley ardved at Tsmailia. ; v'u ' Arabi _*a_ha says he was compelled to fight j t agains,t his wi11.; .-; He maintains -a calm, re- ' ;solu*^Vdfmeanor,i„ HeKinformed General; Lbwelinat he trusted himself to the English i inhonpr as aisoldier .whose army had been * _efea^3;7,<Sejp.eral Lowe repliedhe could not | discuss the'question. of war ; his only mission ; was to arrest, him. „,Arabi .considers M. De Lesseps hks shiamef ully betrayed the National Egyptian * party, > who depended upon his a^riffajacethat he, would: prevent any landing of troops, or Var material by way- of the C„hal. 7T_.e7Bfitish v troops are everywhere well* received', even. . in, the Native, quarter. A humber of Egyptian levies are leaving for •home, _d:many cases taking their Remington irises, i.w.ith them. . Throughout; ■-* the campaign, the Egyptians had ; a complete system of spies in Alexandria and Ismailia. The rebels expected the British would attack Tel-el-Kebir at midnight on the-12th, and they remained iv the trencheß all night. This shows that the ,attack was; nofc a surprise!" A Sto-. cablegram says that at Alexandria the Khedive's partisans .demand that the de^h._? e h^tiy^shaltibe ' inflicted upon eleven memherifof k 6ierjMilitary Government— viz, Ars-.bi, ;Ali -Fehmy, Abdellad, ; Toulba,;and Roubi, Pashas; Mahinoud Fahmy, Mahinoud Ferny i. AhdellaNeder, 'HazzSni Musia; Sheiks Sai_ and Eidrasni. The above* rebels are deejned .to ibe. the -chief '■ instigators 'of the revolfc r ;and the; Khedive -Supporters; allege that it was by-their.overt act that the rebellion wasjset.-on'foot. : The army in Egypt has ,ssfays' '• been'- -most fickle, and ready to fbUQw„thejhero;o£the hour for' an hour and then forsake • him/ for another agitator. From tho first the, Sultan was averse to declaring A_abi Pasha a rebel, and had he not been pressed so closely; in England and beset by complications of . an internal character in the case of his. declining he would have sanctioned and upheld the course pursued by Arabi' in his rebellion. As it was, he only eignea' the proclamation when ifc was plainly apparent that such a step must be taken in ofdeivto preserve his .throne. Now ifc is believed' the Sultan will interpose, at least on belief joiiy A"rab£ Aii, , Fehmy> and Toulba _-___as."" I lt is openly asserted he will never consent 7..t0,, any thing more serious than baWsnmentJ and that after this step is executed he -will, .call Arabi to Constantinople, and give hip. a,, command in the Turkish army; Such a course, it is urged, is demanded by all members of the. Moslem faith, who regard Arabi's revolt as,.an effort to uphold the^ _eli|rib_>of the ! Pfbpn.et. A dressmaker who was at the point of deathv_Bcovered, and the local paper headed the item, " ; Survival of the Fittest." Post-cards should not be employed if you have anything of an urinsual or ambiguous nature to communicate. ' An American newspaper contributor, evidently writing from experience, says " A newspaper man pnce planned a story in which a lady unhappily married was to sue for a divorce, and to make sure of being correct, wrote to a lawyerfriend, stating the case as he meant to describe it. Back came " a post-card — ' You could not get a divorce on the grounds you mention in New York ; you might ih Connecticut or- Maine;' This "card, handed in by the carrier to Mrs newspaper-man one afternoon, when her husband was at business,, raised -a-breeze in the household which was not allayed for some time." : . ;,

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THE WAR IN EGYPT., Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XVII, Issue 234, 17 October 1882

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THE WAR IN EGYPT. Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XVII, Issue 234, 17 October 1882

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