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The Nelson Evening Mail. MONDAY, JUNE 8, 1874.

The Albion arrived at the Bluff yesterday morning with the Suez mail. For some unexplainable reason we have not received any English telegrams by her. Joseph Reid Dodson, Esq., Mayor of Nelson, has been appointed a Justice of the Peace under the "Municipal Corporations Act, 1867." Stoke Rifles and Cadets. — The monthly inspection of these companies will be held to-morrow evening. Nelson Refobm League. — The monthly meeting will be held this evening at the usual place and hour, Wesleyan Church. — Sermons in connection with the anniversary of this Church were preached yesterday in the morning by the Rev W. Keall, and the evening by the Rev T. Buddie. The customary tea and public meeting |will be held to-morrow evening. Artizans' Association. — The members of this Association will give one of their popular entertainments at the Odd-Fellows' Hall to-morrow eveningi The first part will consist principally of vooal music, and the second of the melodrama entitled " Luke the Laborer." Provincial Council. — To-night, which it is hoped will be last of the session, Mr Shephard will move his resolution regarding the £20,000 loan; As the step he proposes to take is in direct opposition to the Government policy a lively debate may be expected. Mr Ivess will also move that all members of the Council residing in Nelson should receive an honorarium of £10. It is strange that such a proposition should be one of the features of a session which has been remarkable for the loudness and frequency of the cry of economy. The Nelson members of the General Synod returned by the Taranaki yesterday. The Bishop of Auckland, who was also a passenger by the same steamer, preached at Christ Churoh in the evening. j

The Lyell lock-up, a dark den ten feet square, has been proclaimed a public gaol of the colony. The demand for labor at Napier continues unabated. The Telegraph states that all the single girls that arrived by the Schiehallion were engaged almost simultaneously with the opening of the barrack gates, and the single men have all. found employment. The Paris Journal gives the following account of the escape of the Communists from New Caledonia: — "A vessel carrying the British flag was for some time in sight of the Island. The Bhip was said to have on board various objects for the use of convicts, and was waiting for permission to land them. That authorisation did not arrive and the craft stayed on, communicating frequently with the shore. One morning the discovery was made that four of the convicts had succeeded in escaping. What had become of them ? The fact was soon known that they had taken refuge on board the self-styled English craft. The first care of the French authorities was to demand them, but the captain refused to give them up. Moreover, he remained a fortnight longer in sight of the coast, having the Communists on board, and then set sail for Sydney." j The Otago Daily Times police re- , port furnishes the following s — Mr Chapman, anti-spiritist and magician, was summoned, at the instance of the Daily Times and Witness Company (Limited), for payment of £4 9s 6d, balance of an advertising account, Mr Chapman: I ask for an adjournment, on two grounds: Firstly, The summons was served in a disgraceful manner on Friday evening, and Saturday being a short day I had not time to get my defence ready. Mr Bathgate: What do you call a disgraceful manner, that is a strong term, is it not? Mr Chapman: This is the way it was served. During the second sight business — I don't know if you have seen it or not? Mr Bathgate (smiling): No, I have not seen it. Mr Chapman :Itis a great pity — (Laughter.) A lady sitting on the stage knows the very moment I touch an article what it is; and the person entrusted with the service of this summons— it was not a bailiff — put it in my hand, and the lady said it was a summons; first a legal document, and then a summonr (Laughter.; I, as a matter of course, to satisfy the audience, had to tell the whole audience it was for me; hence, I conclude this "a disgraceful. I wish to mention that it was not served by an officer of the Court, but at night, during the entertainment, before the whole audience. (Renewed laughter.) Mr Bathgate: Are you living in Dunedin ? Witness: | I am stopping at the Shamrock Hotel. Mr Campbell, plaintiffs representative: I oppose the adjournment, as I understand he gives his last performance here to-night. We have frequently tried to serve defendant with the summons, but could not manage it. Defendant: I was ill. ' No one came to my bed-rbonv It was an easy matter to leave the ; summons. Mr Bathgate said it was requisite that the summons be served personally on defendant. Mr Campbell) bad slight expectation of being paid if the case was adjourned. Mr Bathgate: It is. a pity some other means of serving' the summons was not taken, This was a very public way. What defence is there to the action? Mr Chapman said there was another party who would have to pay the account, he was not liable. Mr Bathgate: Did you order the advertisement? Mr Chapman: No Sir, I did not. He added that though: it was his intention to go to Inver cargill and Queenstown he would come back to Dunedin. Mr Bathgate : If I adjourn it will you see a lawyer? This summons has not been served at the proper time. Mr Chapman : I say the whole thing ought to be squashed— (Laughter.) Mr Bathgate : When a plaintiff thinks a defendant is going to leave a district, he can ask for a shorter time. Ultimately the matter was settled by consent. There is some talk of inaugurating a steeplechase meeting at Auckland in the spring of the year in addition to the autumn meeting. The steeplechase course is certainly an excellent one, and may fairly be stated to be over a good hunting country. The course is a mile and a half in length, with eight jumps. The first consists of a double row of hurdles 3 feet 9 inches high, in front of the grand stand; the next obstacle is a stone wall 4 feet 6 .inches in height, followed by another scoria wall three inches higher; then a gqrse fence with a ditch on the near side, the next obstacle being a Btrong post and rail fence. Between the. fifth and sixth jumps a moderately steep hill has to be surmounted, with a bank on the summit, three feet high, with quickset hedge on top, and a ditch on the other side. The next is a bank with a laid fence on top, and the last, another '■ strong post and rail fence. The course has to be traversed twice round, the horses finishing over a flight of hnrdles in the straight run home. j The Inangahua Quartz - crushing Company sent an order by last mail to Melbourne for twenty head of stampers and two bedans, which will form the most powerful and complete crushing plant yet erected in the Inangahua District. Some interest is being taken on the Thames Goldfield,.by friends of the late Mr Kynnersley, Commissioner on the Nelson South-west Gbldfields, in the proposal to erect a monument to his ', memory. Mr Tyler,' solicitor; ;a,t , th>- ! request of Dr Giles, of Wesfcport, ia'' moving in the matter.— Westport Times. {

. The New Zealand Times of sth met soya:— The steamer Lyttelton will take advantage of the high rates of freight ruling to ship a cargo of the interminable iron pipes for Hokitiks. She will probably sail to-day. Up to the present time from £80 to £100 worth of spars, chaios, &c, have been saved from the wreck of the Earl of Sothesk. The hull of the barque has been shattered into a thousand pieces, which have been dispersed in all directions by the wind and tide. Wellington walking-sticks have always had a peculiar attraction in the eyes of visitors from Australia and elsewhere. It seems that in Dunedin and Cbristchurch, as well as in Australia, the supplejack has come into general use. A dealer in town yesterday received from a Dunedin firm an order for 1000 sticks, which will probably, after due preparation, find their way into the Melbourne market. — Times, At a meeting of the Wellington Education Board held on Thursday last, Mr Henry Willis, of Richmond, Nelson, was appointed master of the Fielding school to be opened on the first July. Hokitika papers refrain from publishing full reports of the proceedings of the Borough Council, as they labor under the conviction that it would not enhance the credit of the town if people at a distance were informed of all that takes place at the meetings. The Westport Times comments as follows .on the recent chenge of Government : — A telegram from Nelson intimates that a new Executive has been formed with Mr E, J. O'Conor as Provincial Treasurer and Secretary, Mr A. Pitt, Provincial Solicitor, Mr Shapter as Goldfields member, and Mr Rout without office. This new deal of cards political presents a combination which is interesting from its novelty if for no other reason. The Superintendent may anticipate finding himself relegated to the position of a mere supernumerary, his salary the only palliative for loss of prestige, and the late Provincial Secretary, Mr Greenfield, will no doubt be judiciously kept behind the scenes as " coach " and prompter to his successor. The goldfields should no longer complain of lack of attention to their requirements. The people of Nelson should a'so be content, though very possibly they will not, and wait patiently the result of the infusion of new blood in the Executive. The man of the hour, Mr O'Conor, has now the opportunity of making or marring his political future. The ball lies at his feet. In his new capacity he will find opportunity for proving, by wise and impartial administration, his qualification for the higher office of Superintendent, qualifications as yet wholly unassured. If he fails during the term of probation such failure will be another proof to those, who have heretofore been his political opponents that they have judged him rightly. It should also be proof positive to those who, ([rightly or wrongly, have hitherto upheld him. In the interests of the province it is to be earnestly desired that no failure will mark the initiation of responsible government under new executive administration. The N. Z. Herald says: — We commend to the notice of our readers the speech " delivered by His Excellency Sir James Fergusson, at the annual distribution of prizes of the Auckland Grammer School. It was in all respects worthy of the- Governor v of a colony who takes a deep interest in the advanced education of those who in the time to come will, in all probability, be our representatives in the Parliament of the colony, or who will be called upon to fill important public functions pertaining to the weal. •? We musk," remarked his Excellency, looked forward to the great future before New Zealand, and see to it that the young men of the higher and middle classes shall be well fitted to take their positions in society; and that all, to whatever class they belong, who have energy and an anxiety to rise, shall have the opportunity of doing so afforded to them." Thiß is just what is asked for, and what we hope will be granted in full meaßure. We want to give facilities to those who are anxious of themselves to rise above the ordinary range of a middle-claßß education. We agree, too, with Sir James where he says, "I think we ought too look diligently for the best means by which the sons of Maori chiefs may set a worthy example to their people, and to take part in the management of the country. It seems to me that they ought to have the best education the country can afford. But to turn the best born Maori boys into a school like this would perhaps be injurious to the school and to themselves. It seems to me that in Auckland there ought to be a boarding-house where they could bo managed in the manner best suited to their previous life and temperaments, and be gradually brought up to do better than their fathers, and taught to set an example to their people, and lead them to higher and better things." His Excellency speaks the outcome of his reflections upon an important subject, and we can only hope his opinions may be allowed to take root, grow, blossom and bear fruit. The policy of " exterminating " the Maori belongs to the past. Thinking men, in common with Sir James Fergusßon, believe in educating his offspring aud so in after years enabling them to take their appointed places in the Government of the country, and of forming aa integral pcrtipn of it. 1 A Dunedin gentleman bias been sumjmon'eid to appear before R.M. at Oamaru, to answer a complaint of

baviDg kicked away a ladder from under the town lamp-lighter, while engaged in lighting a lamjp, thereby causing him personal injury aud breaking the lamp. The damages are laid at £20. A new pound is being erected in Dunedin, designed on " principles of ornament and humanity." In the enclosure there is to be an ornamental shed that will give shelter to any unfortunate brutes that may find their way into this place of detention, instead of leaving them, as is too often cruelly done, exposed to the weather, aD<J up to their bodies in mud. A private letter received in Dunedin states that the hairless horse Caoutchouc has arrived in Sun Francisco, and is causing some little stir there. He was landed in splendid condition, and was " playing " to crowded houses. Considerable excitement is said to exist in the South regarding the alleged rich gold discoveries in Apia, one of the Navigator Islands. At both Port Chalmers and Lyttelton vessels have been laid on for Samoa aud are filling up well. A passenger per the Omeo, from New Zealand, named James Martin, has been admitted to the Geelong Hospital in a helpless state. According to a statement in the ' Argus/ he says that whilst working at the erection of of an iron bridge over the river Wuitaki, fifteen miles from Dunedio, a girder fell on him, the result of which was that both his thighs were broken. He was conveyed to the hospital at Oamaru, where he remained till fourteen days Bince, by which time the bones of one of his thighs had become united, but so imperfectly that he could make no use of it, whilst the bones of the other limb had, apparently, never set at nil. Hearing of what had been done in the way of cures in the Geelong Hospital he found hia way thither, and now awaits an operation, iv the hope that it may prove efficacious, The London Times has completed a careful review of the census of 1871 of the British Empire. There are 38 persons to a square mile in the Empire; 260 in the United Kingdom; 201 in India; and 1.41 in the colonies. It should be observed, however, that in some parts of India the density of population more than equals that of Eugland. The Queen rules over 238,765,563 souls; he*r people dwell in 44,142,654 houses ; the area of the lauds inhabited is not less than 7,769,449 square miles. The Times correspondent at St. Petersburg writes: — La3t night (Feb. 19) was Patti's benefit at the Grand Theatre, where*the famous songßtress received a welcome fairly astonishing to those who had never before witnessed the enthusiasm w'th which a Russian audience greets a favorite prima donna. A diamond coronal and great bouquets and wreaths without number were presented between the acts, and at the conclusion of the opera the stage was literally heaped with flowers and wreaths. Patti at last could do no more than pick up one or two and press them to her heart, and the attendants had to come on with great baskets, and even then had hard work to clear the stage. The opera was "La Traviata." Patti was in perfect voice, and looked and sang and acted her very best.

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Bibliographic details

The Nelson Evening Mail. MONDAY, JUNE 8, 1874., Nelson Evening Mail, Volume IX, Issue 135, 8 June 1874

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The Nelson Evening Mail. MONDAY, JUNE 8, 1874. Nelson Evening Mail, Volume IX, Issue 135, 8 June 1874

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