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The Nelson Evening Mail. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1872.

Cricket. — The steamer Wanganui is expected from Wanganui with a cricketing team, arrangements having been made for a match between them and the Wakefield Club, to be played on Monday. Stoke Library.— -A meeting will be held in the Stoke schoolroom on Monday evening, at half-past seven, for the purpose of electing a Library Committee, and for the transaction of other business. The Maungatapu Road. — A traveller recently arrived from tbe Wairau via the Maungatapu informs us that the bridge across the Tinline is not safe to ride over, the timbers being in a very rotten state. Wairau Election. — The nomination of candidates for the seat in the House of Representatives, rendered vacant hy the resignation of Mr. Eyes, took place on Wednesday last, when Mr. Seymour and Mr. Ward were proposed. The show of hands gave 27 for Seymour aud 14 for Ward. A poll was- demanded, and will take place on Monday next. Leap Year.— This being leap year, and tbe present the season dedicated to St. Valentine, the following quotation from an old Saxon law may interest our fair readers: — "Albeit, as often as leap yeare dothe occurre, the woman holdeth prerogative over the menne in matter of courtship, love, and matriraonie ; so that when the lady proposeth it shall not be lawful for menne to say her nae, but shall receive her proposal in all good courtisie." The Wakamarina. — The present dry season is highly favorable to some of the mining speculations in the Wakamarina, which but for the little water ih the river could not be carried on. First, there is the Hit-or-Miss claim, which has engaged the efforts of a succession oi men for two or three years. A race 600 feet in length, seven feet wide, and five feet in depth, has beeu cut in the rock to carry the water of the river two miles above Caovastown. This, together with the necessary dams, and two large water-wheels to work pumps keeps the exposed bed dry from leakage, is a work of very considerable magnitude. Favored by the season, this is now complete, and tbe enterprising men who have succeeded in their undertaking are now engaged in stripping the shingle from the river bed to reach the wash-dirt, which is giving them about two ounces and a half of gold to the load, being however, less tban they expected to get. Some distance higher up the river, the Hard Times claim, an undertaking of a similar character, but only about half the extent, is also getting at work. Higher up still, a party fluming the river are very successful, and making at least £lb a week each

man. The punt for the dredging company is now complete, and is spoken of as an excellent piece of work. It needs but the necessary fitting up, but from tbe energy shown by the company we may expect no delay in the commencement cf their operations. We shall be very glad to record tho success of the men who have exhibited such an amount of enterprise and perseverance. — Press. The Pkemier at Charleston. — We take tbe following from the Herald of Wednesday last : — On Saturday afternoon the hon. Mr. Fox, accompanied by his lady, started from Westport for Charleston, and arrived at the Nile Bridge about iour o'clock, where he was met by tbe deputation appointed to receive him, and also a number of our townspeople. Mr. Murray, ■ World Circus, kindly lent t his excellent brass band for The coach drew up in fiont lotel, and a complimentary read and presented by Mr. Dwan. In reply, Mr. Fox made a very neat speech. He said the pleasure of such a reception was quite unexpected, and he was, therefore, unprepared to address them at any length. He reciprocated the kindly feeling expressed towards himself and the Government, and rejoiced with them at the favorable circumstances of the colony. Peace and order had almost totally been restored amongst the .Native race, and voder Providence, he hoped that all causes for dissension had been completely removed. It was true there was still a small body of turbulent natives existing, but the difficulties had so far been settled that the Government hoped no longer to have to draw on the revenue of the middle island for native purposes. He had only that morning received satisfactory telegrams from Mr. M'Lean, informing him of satisfactory settlements being made with certain natives for the purchase of land, &c. He had, however, uot come here to tell but to learn. In studying the Goldfields interests the Government had received macy contradictory statements, aud r therofore, he with his colleagues thought that it was only , right he should use his own eyes and ears j iv acquiring information to enable them to i adopt measures for the benefit of the goldfields. He therefore, hoped to go away better informed upon all subjects in connection with their interests." The deputation then proceeded to lay their grievances before Mr. Fox, who replied in a leDgthy speech, from which we propose to make a few extracts on Monday.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NEM18720217.2.7

Bibliographic details

The Nelson Evening Mail. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1872., Nelson Evening Mail, Volume VII, Issue 42, 17 February 1872

Word Count
858

The Nelson Evening Mail. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1872. Nelson Evening Mail, Volume VII, Issue 42, 17 February 1872

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