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DECLARATION OF POLLS.

About fifty persons were present in the Provincial Hall this morning at the declaration of the Polls for the City and Suburban districts. the city. Thomas Brunner, Esq., Returning Officer, having read the number of votes polled for the Town of Nelson, declared Oswald Curtis and Martin Lightband to be duly elected. Mr. Curtis said that after the official declaration just made, it only remained for him to return his sincere thanks to the electors, and to assure them that the confidence they had evinced in bim would not be betrayed, but that he should always do his best for their interests. It was a matter, for congratulation that the election bad been conducted without any quarelling or hard words, and that whatever political opinions had been expressed, no breach of private friendship had taken place. He should like to say a few words with reference to the ballot. To the system that lately prevailed he had always been opposed, as it was simply an affectation of secrecy, and consequently, he had been prepared to change it either for open, or for really secret, voting. The colony at large evidently desired to see the latter, and, therefore he had supported the ballot. In conclusion, he desired once more to return his earnest thanks to the electors, especially to those friends who had exerted themselves so warmly in his behalf, and also to the Returning Officer for the manner in which he had conducted the election. Mr. Lightband wished to return thanks for the high honor conferred upon him, although he was not particularly proud of tho honor, as he considered it was accompanied by very grave responsibilities, and gave rise to mauy fears whether he could carry out the duties entrusted to him in a creditable manner. However, he could but say that his earnest endeavor would be to do that duty, and nothing should be wanting on his part to prove himself worthy of the trust reposed in him. For 29 years he had been a resident in Nelson, where he had been brought up and educated, and he could not but consider it as a flattering tribute to his character that he should now occupy so proud a position. Particularly, would he thank the newspapers for the very lenient way in which they had treated him since he had come forward as a candidate. He had always endeavored to prove in his own private dealings that honesty' was the best policy, and he felt sure that it was advisable to carry out this honesty in political as well as in commercial life. One of his chief endeavors iv the House would be to obtain some alteration in the Bankruptcy Act, which in its present state was a stain on the commercial community. The money expended on the Volunteers in Nelson he looked upon as thrown away, not that those who belonged to the force did not do their duty, but there were too few of them to be of any service, and he should like to see the money spent on the drilling of hoys at the College and Government schools. He wished to thank the electors for the confidence they had shown in him, his Committee for the manner in which they had worked, and also those who, since his election had taken him by the hand. Mr. Shephard said that the electors would expect but few words from him, and he merely came forward to thank those who had spontaneously voted for him. No cauvass had been undertaken on his behalf, and he had the greater reason to be proud of the support that bad been accorded to him. He trusted they would find that their choice had fallen on men who would serve them better than he could have done. His interest in the welfare of the Province and city "would not in tbe smallest degree be diminished by his defeat, but he should continue to exert himself for the public good just as much as if he had had the honor of being their representative. THE SUBURBS. The Returning Officer having declared Mr. Ralph Richardson duly elected for

the suburbs, that gentleman came forward aud said that although from the first he had always had hopes of success, hopes that sometimes grew brighter, and at other times darker, still he had never anticipated so large a majority as that which the polliug showed to* be iv his favor, nnd he siucerely trustea that the electors would never have reason to consider their confidence in him misplaced. But few of his constituents were present, but as the representatives of the press were there, he would, through their agency, convey his hearty thanks to those who had supported him. There was one gentlemau present, however, to whom he felt that he did owe a debt of gratitude, he referred to his noble friend the editor of the Colonist, to whose persistent and determined opposition he was very much inclined to attribute the successful termination of the election. He concluded by saying that, while he deeply felt the honor conferred upon him, he was fully aware of the responsibilities he had undertaken, and would go to the House with a full determination to do the best in his power for the welfare of his constituents. A vote of thanks to the Returning Officer terminated the proceedings.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NEM18710208.2.10

Bibliographic details

DECLARATION OF POLLS., Nelson Evening Mail, Volume VI, Issue 33, 8 February 1871

Word Count
902

DECLARATION OF POLLS. Nelson Evening Mail, Volume VI, Issue 33, 8 February 1871

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