Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

EARLY ELECTION

BRITISH CONSTITUENCIES. FOLLOWING UPON DISSOLUTION. MACDONALD MINISTRY'S DEFEAT. (Received 9.5 a.m.) LONDON, October 9. lii the House of Commons Mr J. H. Thomas said that if the Liberal amendment moved by Sir John Simon, to appoint a select. ■ committee to investigate the withdrawal of the proceedings against J. R. Campbell, editor of the "Workers' Weekly," were carried the necessary steps would be taken to accept it as the verdict of the House, but only as the verdict of the House. Ministers would refuse to allow Ibe Conservatives to drop their vote of censure to vote for the Liberal amendment, so a division would be taken to decide whether the House would divide on the vote of censure or the. Liberal amendment. The division resulted in 359 votes, to 198 in favour of voting on the amendment, which was then carried by 364 votes to 198. On the motion of the Prime Minister the House rose till to-morrow. —Renter. THE KING AGREES. DISSOLUTION GRANTED. (Eeueived 3.30 p.m.) LONDON, October 9. Mr MacDoruild advised the King to grant a dissolution and "Lie King agreed. Mr Mae-Donald, in the House of Commons, announced that the elections would be held on October 29. Mr J. Hw Thomas said that the political happenings would not interfere with the Government's proceedings regarding the proposed Imperial Conf eren ce. —Re uter. RESIGNATION IMPROBABLE. POLLING NEXT MONTH. LABOUR'S BIG BID. (Secerned 9.5 .aan.) LONDON, October 9. Immediately after the House rose the Cabinet met in the J'rime Minister's room and broke up at midnight, after which Mr Mac Donald went to bed. He had been suffering from neuralgia for several days and started yesterday with a visit to a dentist, having several teeth extracted. The King left Balmoral Castle last evening and is due in London at 8 o'clock this morning. It is understood that Mr MacDonald will visit Buckingham Palace and advise a dissolution. There is a suggestion of resignation, leaving the King to summon one of the other party leaders, but little credence is attached to this. The House will meet to-day at the usual hour, when the Prime Minister in a statement will proceed to clear up the Irish and other business. It is anticipated that the polling will take place on either November 8 or 15. There are not likely to be as many Conservative candidates as at the last election, when there were 538, the heavy expense of two contests within 12 months keeping i»any back. The Socialists intend to fight every possible seat. They will have many more candidates than at the last election. The Liberal candidates probably will not exceed 300. It is expected that the Liberals and Conservatives will avoid three-cornered contests. — A. and N.Z.

"SOMTHING TO HIDE." OVER CAMPBELL AFFAIR, (Received 9.40 a.m.) LONDON, October 9. The "Daily Mail" says: "The Campbell affair is most detrimental to British justice and is rendered moi'e suspicious by the confused and conflicting statements by Ministers, whose desperate resistance to a judicial inquiry will convince the country that they have something to hide." —Sun. GREATER VICTORY. GATEWAY OPENED. (Received 12.50 p.m.) LONDON, October 9. At the Labour Conference Mr J. R. CJynes, Deputy Leader of the House of Commons, rising to make an announcement on behalf of Mr Mac Donald said lie had just left the Prime Minister, who was confident and cheerful. He was at present at Buckingham Palace with the King. Mr Clynes continued that Labour had reason to be proud of its Prime Minister, and never more so than in the hour of defeat, which was the gateway to greater victory. Mr Clynes said he was satisfied that tin- country would not condemn the Attorney-General for refusing to imprison a crippled ex-soldier for an article in the "Workers' Weekly." He felt convinced that the Labour Cabinet, which bad been unable to get fair play in the House of Commons, would get if from the Throne in authority to dissolve Parliament. —- Renter.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NA19241010.2.40

Bibliographic details

EARLY ELECTION, Northern Advocate, 10 October 1924

Word Count
663

EARLY ELECTION Northern Advocate, 10 October 1924

Working