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THE TURF.

VARIOUS JOTTINGS

Although Mr W. G. Stead tailed to win a race at the R.R.C. SpringMeeting, his horses secured £720 in place money. * * * * The crowd at Fllemington was so great at the recent meeting of the v ictoria racing Club that many people wuo were present on the course were unaole to see the race for the Melbourne Gup. Others took up positions in the stand at ten o'clock in the morning and did not leave them until after they had seen the race. # * ❖ * "The Rook," in the Christchurch Referee, says he has not heard what Mr T. H. Lowry has decided to do with Desert Gold. He is selling all the rest of his horses in training, but it would be a very safe gamble that •Mother" is not one of the lot under otter to prospective buyers. The old champion looks as sound and as good as ever she did, but many years' campaigning have found her out f and though she would give the galloper the father of a beating yet, she is not capable of defeating high-class horses that have got youth to assist them. Oh well, it comes to everything in its turn, and great mare that Desert Gold was, she is not so now, and as no horse lover wants to see- her struggling in handicaps, whatever they might have fancied two seasons ago, The Rook s ays retire Desert Gold to the matron's paddock, and do it soon. The Wellington Racing Club has decided to make substantial additions to the stake money for Ithe Summer Meeting. The Wellington Cup will be worth 1500 soys, the Wellington Racing Club Handicap 1000 soys, and the Summer Cup 750 soys. The Telegraph Handicap, the principal sprint event, has been raised to 1000 soys, and the sic furlongs events on the second and third days of 500 soys each. There are three good welter races, one of 400 soys, and two of 350 soys each, and another attractive event will be the Waterloo Stakes, of 500 soys, six furlongs, weight-for-age, with penalties and allowances. ■;.- * . # * The great sprinter Irish Elegance added to his record at Doncaster (England) on September 12. In a field of thirteen, and lOst 21b (minimum 6st), he was made favourite for the Portland Handicap, of £965, five furlongs and 152 yards. Leading a furlong from home, he eventually won by three lengths. He was ridden by B. Carslake, whose season's record up to September 13 was 82 first, 51 seconds, and 34 thirds for 259 mounts. In winning percentage he led Donoghue with 31-66 against the latter's 27.75. Donoghue's winning mounts up to the date mentioned totalled 111. * * * * Gay Lad has been retired to the stud, the cause was a tendon strained while running in the New Zealand Cup. The Rook had and has a great opinion of Gay Lad's ability as a galloper either over a short or a long course, and would have liked greatly to have s een the Cellini-Gaysome horse train on, and there is nothing more certain than that he would have taken high honours among our w.f.a horses, and none of them are barred. Scoffers may laugh, and refer to Gay Lad's running in the Cup. Well, let 'em, scoffers are not always right any more that The Rook is, and no man with a knowledge of racing would take notice of the performance of a horse ridden as Gay Lad was, for there can be little doubt that having got into difficulties, his rider lost hi s head. There will be several of Gay Lad's yearlings up for sale next November, and if they take after their father in looks and style of action, then they will bring long prices.

It is contended by some people j that there is no such thing as hie!, (writes Pilot in the .Sydney 'Heferee"). Perhaps, but. it niigbt b" safe to bet that Sir Samuel tlordern does not entii-ely uphold that view. Artilleryman, of whom tie i s halfowner, won the Melbourne Cup. and Sir Samuel also drew Richmond Main —1500 for second —in one of Tattersall's sweeps on the race. * * * * Some of the Wellington R.C. stewards proposed that the Wellington Cup distance should be increased to one mile and three-quarters instead of having it a twelve furlong race as it has been for years. For many reasons it was a move in .the night direction. One, a good one, was that the track is an ideal one for a race of the distance, as preferable to a twelve furlong race, for with the new idea the competitors would have had a run of more than four furlongs to the first turn, which would have allowed the field to settle down, and so reduce_ the scramble for places that now takes place when the turn is reached shortly after going two furlongs. Another good reason in favour of the longer distance i s that horses are well seasoned in January, and so more capable of getting the distance without feeling the strain afterwards, than earlier in the season, and lastly the Wellington Club is well on its way to become the premier racing body in New Zealand, and for that reason alone they should advance with the times, and not be satisfied to rest on their oars. * * * * In a recent issue of the "Sydney Mail" Milrop writes as follows in praise of maize as a food for horses: —Not so many years ago p very Randwick trainimt- stable boasted a maize bin; but the fashion for oats came in very strong after Dick Mason cleared the Randwick board of 1905 with Noctuiiform and Co., and two New Zealanders —Maniapoto and Solution—won the Metropolitan of 1905 and 1906. After this Randwick trainers would have nothing but New Zealand oats and New Zealand hay and they all shod their horses with the lightest of shoes, because Mason did so; and they all tried to get their oats out of the same paddock as Mason did. But seemingly they did not know that Mason used a good deal of maize, and few horses of our time ate as much of it as Biplane did when Mason trained toim. The three best trainers of long-dis-tance horses I have known were three Jims—to wit, Jim Redfearn, of Caulfield; Jim Cambers, of Morpeth; and Jim McGill, of Brisbane—and the principal food used by them for their horses was maize. Mr McGill was a very heavy maize-feeder. Modern trainers who know more about the odds than about food values, declare maize is too heating, and objectionable for many other reasons, particularly in a warm climate. But Morpeth is a pretty hot spot—though nothing like so warm as Brisbane; yet the racing records show what Chambers and McGill did with their maizefed horses. I was once interested in a horse who walked about 4000 miles from meeting to meeting, winning everywhere, between Cloncurry and Blackall, and who came to Sydney and won races at Randwick and elsewhere. He retired from the turf at the age of 12, without a blemish on his legs, and died 18 years later. He was fed only on maize and bluegrass —two foods full of oil and sugar. Mr McGill trained horses on maize, and won races with them till they were 10 and 12 years old, and he never owned a broken-down horse; yet the modern trainer will not use miaze for horses doing the hardest kind of work. If inclined to improve their minds as to food values, they would acquire a lot of information as to the relative value of maize and oats and oaten and lucerne hay from users of hardworking draught horses in the city or on the farm.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NA19191202.2.62

Bibliographic details

THE TURF., Northern Advocate, 2 December 1919

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1,293

THE TURF. Northern Advocate, 2 December 1919

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