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BRITISH MONEY FOR GREECE

I-Lloyd'George.'-Tries to TrickErllisli" labour Tlie Diplomatic Correspondent of j the British Labour Party's "Labour ! Press Service/ 12/10/22, writes: — j One-'disadvantage-of deputations to • V Downing- Street is that these inte-r-I views usually.conclude with the Prime j Minister's reply. j He may interrupt you; if yon intei*i rupt him you arc bru shed -aside with "Bo let mc finish." Documents are quoted which are not within the possession of the deputation, and references are made which cannot be tested The reply of Mr. Lloyd George to the deputation of the Trades Union . Congress which met him on Thursday, September 21, 1922, had the full quota of misrepresentations and halftruths which w.e expect from him. iMr. Thomas had reminded'-him. of the prophetic resolution of the Labour and Socialist International at Lucerne warning the working-class that the sending of the Greek troops to Smyrna would arouse a warlike passion and a -spirit of reveirge Tin aIT Anatolia. *■ - - The predictions of the International, unfortunately, were all too well founded, "fee Greek occupation created t-he present Turkish Nationalist movement, and led to the GraecoTurkish War. ALLIED RESPONSIBILITY. Mr. Lloyd George is strangely innocent about the circumstances of this occupation. "We do not propose to support enterprises' in Asia Minor," he said, "and have never done so." This is an outrageous perversion of the facts. The Greeks may have gone to Smyrna at their own risk, but they . did so with a, mandate from the Supreme Council, under cover of the guns of the Allied warships. According to'Venizelos, the sine qua -non of the Greek effort in Asia Minor was Allied co-operation; when Allied co-operation was withdrawn, the Greek enterprise was doomed to failure. Moreover, as the Graeco-Turkish War has. come, to an end with the intervention of the Allies, and the offer" .of a territoral settlement to Turkey which was denied to them in the Treaty of Sevres-, and was- denied to them even in March last, it is not an exaggeration to state that the Allies, and Great-—Britain, could have stopped the Graeco-Turkish War at any moment. • BRITISH MONEY. Again,, let us exumine; another ofthe airy assurances of Mr. Lloyd George. ""We never paid sixpence to the. Greeks," he says. ■- "We never gave them support either in money or in arms." (This statement was cabled to N.Z.—Ed. M.W.) . , 't' ' - The Prime Minister is unaccountably forgetful of. his dealings with other people's money. On December 22, 1920, Mr. Cham-, berlain informed the House of Commons' that the cash advances to the Greek Government since 1914 to the return of* ex-King Constantine to the throne of Greece amounted to £15,----860,000. ' "We'never ' paid.-sixpence to ih'e Greeks!-'' ■ Between February, 1918, and the return of Constantine, the Government of M. Vehlzelos drew ' irjpon a book credit opened by Lloyd George's Government to the extent of "approximately £■ 6,500,000. Tlie new Greek Government "was informed that in the event of-the return of ex-King Constantine to the throne of Greece no- * further financial assistance would- be afforded; — Hansard, December 9V '1920, , v ~"

SLIPPERY TACTICS, ■ ff'% In the same month an Allied -Con- s ferei!ce stated the reasons why finaix-"" \ i .cial gupj-'ort had Greece--but, if. we may believe Lloyd "'/;' George, this was Quite unnecejssarsv ' : ' as we had never given them support ; either in money, or in arms. .' ' " ■Mr ."""Lloyd George' was guilty of ■ similar slippery tactics when-he" sug-' gested that "the Turks demand con- 'v trol of Ihe Straits," and that the Turkish National Pact, ot which the depu- :• | tation die! not possess a copy, "sub- ; -~\ -stantially demands that they should" '; Lave the power to close the Straits.'" _",'>.•;>" This was a grave misrepresentatiba ; -'v of , Ai-gora's attitude. It was similar insufficient and misleading iru; *■ formation that tie Dominions wei- ■"' .:'■ called to arms to fight for the Free-. - dom of the Straits. . ; , •■, The Fourth Article" of the Turkisti ' National Pact is an unequivocal de- • claration:— . [ Provided the security of the City . of Constantinople and of the Sea oCi '" Marmora is protected from every;, danger, whatever decision may be. y arrived at jointly by us and all other*.:,- . t - Governments concerned regarding"; ' the opening of the Bosphorus to the-j ' commerce and traffic of the worlds*. is valid. _ '. ' '$*■;£ This was translated by; ; the._ Angggfcnfi G over mn&ni*'^ just before their successful offensive? ~: against, the Greeks. . ..- \L■■■■< The offer brought .by Fethi Bey was?; y that an adequate zone of territory oy£f~ both sides of the Bosphorus and Dardanelles should . be demilitarised i .:. and neutralised, and that the of Nations should be given full ancLjj-- I - perpetual powers of Inspection to - that this status was not infringed b_& Turkey, the Entente- Powers, or any other party. .- "FREEDOM" OF THE STRAITS. " That is what the Turkish Nationals} Government understands by the,l "Freedom of the Straits." ' t; What does the British Government- }' mean by the " Freedom of thel Straits"? . - • >l Mr. Lioyd George gave this definl-.' tion to Ben T_Sl«t_:—• ,f*\ The Freedom of the Straits isj ■this—that it should be just like other International waterway, that. - it should be free to the vessels of\ any nation to pass to and fro to that.a Black Sea without any interference, ' and that you should have a guaran-,} tee, not merely" on the word of the ) ' • 'Turk, but of the control of thoT League of Nations," in order to ; en- *} ' sure free passage. This is the latest restatement of the* >' Coalition's policy oii. the Freedom of/- . the Straits. ■■-■-- "; Yv'heiT they had the power to inter- \ nationalise the Straits, the British", **.' French and Italian Governments plac-J ed them under their own joint con--; -trol, with Great Britain as the pre-' \ dominant partner. Great Britain*; '■ France and Italy took power to ivee*}),--' permanent military and naval garr_- T .sons in the zone, of the Straits. i The new definition of the Freedom; of the Straits is also open to a simi-v) lai* interpretation. When the Labour*.. Party declares that the Straits-should?' be demilitarised and neutralised it,' means that neutral merchant-; ships \ should be enabled to use the Straits ja ' war as well as in peace. / It. means that it may be necessary,/ to close the Straits, both in peace and* war, to warships. What does Mr. ■■ Lloyd George mean by demilitarisa-. ;t'ion? •' --.' ■' ' ' Does'it imply, in his mind the with-. draw*! of- Allied troops and warships, as well as non-occupation of the de~ 'militarised zone by Turkish forces? ' We have-grave reasons; to doubt it. ( Yet both these conditions are equally;.] essential, to "demilitarisation. • - ) •■' The verbatim ; report of his 'speecE ' to'the Trades Union. Congress; depu- 1 tation does nothing to .clear tho pub-! lie bind on tliis' and other isiiies'. It [ merely shows theCPrime Minister in { his trickiest' a_._ most evasive i_ioo_d« \

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BRITISH MONEY FOR GREECE, Maoriland Worker, Volume 12, Issue 302, 13 December 1922

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BRITISH MONEY FOR GREECE Maoriland Worker, Volume 12, Issue 302, 13 December 1922

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